Jump to content
Following a software upgrade the Classifieds section is out of action. I'm working to resolve this. ×
 

Pdk 47xx


Recommended Posts

Hi

 

I'm tempted to buy a 47xx pdk kit and I was wondering if anyone on here has built one an could advise me if there any good? Any help or advice would me much appreciated. I love the look of the 47xx's an my old crown line one is looking it's age I think.

 

Cheers Neil

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought that PDK were the Crownline kits!! I sure that someone will know more than I do about it.

They are to all intents and purposes what Crownline kits would have been, sharing the same owner (Dave King) and the same artwork designer (Paul Hill), and virtually the same range of models that were available from Crownline, albeit with artwork tweaked and the range expanded.

 

Dave never really "retired" (don't ever mention this to Dave Smith, ex-Blacksmith Models!). He merely changed to a different set of bagpipes....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so will the pdk be much different than the crown line kit then? Mine had to be made with the help of a Hornby king body! I see the new pdk has a resin boiler? What are they like?

 

Thanks for your help!

 

Cheers Neil

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so will the pdk be much different than the crown line kit then? Mine had to be made with the help of a Hornby king body! I see the new pdk has a resin boiler? What are they like?

 

The PDK 47xx has the benefit of never having been a Crownline full kit.

 

The resin boilers that PDK distribute are no-nonsense products - they do the job and are actually quite OK. If they have a flaw, it's that sometimes it's not clear where you can stick sufficient weight into them, or that the bottom of the barrel is missing in order to make space for those who want their motors to drive the central axle rather than a rear one.

 

Some of them (the Thompson and Peppercorn Pacific kits especially) did initially have a problem in looking ever so slightly undersized, because at that time the design called for the (etched) smokebox wrapper to be simply wrapped around the outside, leaving a noticeable "step" down to the front of what would be the front of the boiler barrel cladding. I ended up making a boiler wrapper to make up the difference, as this was easier than to try to mess about with resin. Some of the kits are being retooled so that the smokebox section of the resin boiler is recessed (i.e. smaller in diameter) so that when you wrap the smokebox wrapper around it, the resultant join to the boiler barrel front looks seamless, as it should be.

 

I don't think you will have a problem with the 47xx. The demonstration photo suggests that it's got all the right curves in all the right places. When you've built it, compare it with your earlier converted one. If you really want to push the boat out after that, have a go at building the Martin Finney 47xx, then compare that to the other two...... :mail:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that horsetan that's really helpful. In the pictures of the kit I see brass on resin! Is that glued on to it? Also how much harder is the Martin finney 47xx to build? Is it far superior to the pdk in detail?

 

Thanks Neil

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that horsetan that's really helpful. In the pictures of the kit I see brass on resin! Is that glued on to it?

You can only really glue the brass wrapper onto the resin, although location pins soldered to the brass and then "pressed" into the resin can help things stay in place whilst your glue sets.

 

Also how much harder is the Martin finney 47xx to build? Is it far superior to the pdk in detail?

The Finney 47xx is some way ahead in testing your skill, but will help you get that museum quality model. That's why I think it's a good idea to have the three brands of 47xx to mark your progression in skills, from the RTR conversion, to the resin and brass kit (PDK), up to the state-of-the-art brass/nickel silver kit, by which time you will be able to handle that last one. Then you'll realise it wasn't so hard after all.

 

Finney kits are nice to build they involve a lot of work. Definatly not for a beginner.

Once "Our Man In Bovey Tracey" finishes the PDK version, he'll be well on the way to coping with a Finney. Sky's the limit. Realising that you have performed beyond what you thought was possible is the Mandela approach to loco building.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Horsetan,

Can Mr Finney's masterpiece in etched brass be built in as built condition?

I think you can only build it as a production 47xx - that is, 4701-8 with a Standard no.7 boiler, which was also subsequently fitted to 4700.

 

If you want a No.1 boiler for 4700 then you will either have to roll your own, or try and get a spare no.1 boiler etch (also used on the 28xx and the "Hall") from Martin, or David Geen ("Grange" and "Star" kits), or try to adapt the whitemetal one from SE Finecast.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Finney kits are nice to build they involve a lot of work. Definatly not for a beginer.

I dislike this ability to disagree without having to put your reason why.

I as a beginner would not of been able to tackle a Finney kit. I still take a deep breath before weaiding the soldering iron on one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...