Jump to content
Following a software upgrade the Classifieds section is out of action. I'm working to resolve this. ×
 

Late 1960 of branch lines (soon closed)


Recommended Posts

  • RMweb Premium

I doubt class 28s worked branch line freight trains that much, not until late in their lives when they were exiled to secondary line duties in the far North West of England anyway. Some of them were withdrawn before the steam locos they were sent to replace, as I understand!

Class 31s were real maids of all work, especially in the Eastern Region (and later in the WR, where they replaced the WR's own class 22s, Hymeks etc).  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I doubt class 28s worked branch line freight trains that much, not until late in their lives when they were exiled to secondary line duties in the far North West of England anyway. Some of them were withdrawn before the steam locos they were sent to replace, as I understand!

Class 31s were real maids of all work, especially in the Eastern Region (and later in the WR, where they replaced the WR's own class 22s, Hymeks etc).

Thank you Colin
Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the branch lines modellers do are the classic single-track-with-passing-loop style of railway. Firstly most of these railways were in their final years by the early sixties and secondly most of them had distinctly dodgy track and wouldn't be able to cope with the heavy diesel electric locos. Diesel hydraulic perhaps, but I'd be wary of diesel electrics. I should think that most of the freight traffic over such lines would be hauled by the 08 d/e shunters. Their low top speed wouldn't be an issue and their very high tractive effort and low axle weight would endear them to the civil engineers and traffic depts alike.

 

Regards

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium

Trouble with 08s is that they're a bit slow and could possibly cause problems on a single track line, holding up passenger trains. On one of my local lines (Witham-Braintree) class 31s worked the remaining goods trains before facilities were withdrawn.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On Eastern Region branch lines you could have lightweight diesel electrics such as classes 15, 16 and 20 on freight workings. Certainly class 15's worked on many of the Great Eastern branch lines and light railways. Class 16's worked on the Buntingford branch in Hertfordshire, and classes 15. 16 and 20 could all be seen on some of the many freight duties around London such as on the Poplar Branch which was London Midland Region.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium

Most of the branch lines modellers do are the classic single-track-with-passing-loop style of railway. Firstly most of these railways were in their final years by the early sixties and secondly most of them had distinctly dodgy track and wouldn't be able to cope with the heavy diesel electric locos. Diesel hydraulic perhaps, but I'd be wary of diesel electrics. I should think that most of the freight traffic over such lines would be hauled by the 08 d/e shunters. Their low top speed wouldn't be an issue and their very high tractive effort and low axle weight would endear them to the civil engineers and traffic depts alike.

 

Regards

Hi David

 

One of the problems with branch lines was the high level of the cost of the track maintenance, dodgy track was not a general issue. Axle weight of many diesel-electrics which replaced steam on branch freights was the same or even less. Most branches had the type 1 or type 2 classes allocated to their region trundle up and down them with the daily freight. 350hp shunters, as Colin has stated were slow, 15mph on the Eastern Region so were not common on branch freights except some very short lines. The smaller diesel mechanical types would be seen on certain branches as they had a higher top speed, normally 25 mph. BR 204hp 0-6-0s (class 03) were used on passenger on the Highworth Branch and the stub of the ex-Bedford to Hitchin line from Henlow to Hitchin.

 

Some branch lines would see type 3 or even type 4 locomotives regularly, depended on the type of traffic.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium

Would it be stretching a point to include Oxford - Cambridge?

It did run into the late 1960s and well beyond in the odd section and was used as a short branch to serve some locations rather than as a through route.

Bernard

In that case, as far as I remember I think the local station goods yards on the Cambridge-Bedford section closed around the same time as steam finished so there wasn't much diesel hauled freight apart from a dwindling number of through trains.  The diesels I remember seeing most of on that line were class 31s, although I was quite young at the time!

Link to post
Share on other sites

In that case, as far as I remember I think the local station goods yards on the Cambridge-Bedford section closed around the same time as steam finished so there wasn't much diesel hauled freight apart from a dwindling number of through trains.  The diesels I remember seeing most of on that line were class 31s, although I was quite young at the time!

My experience is more of the other end.

Almost any thing could be sent to Bicester COD and a lot of mineral traffic around Bletchley.

Bernard

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium

In that case, as far as I remember I think the local station goods yards on the Cambridge-Bedford section closed around the same time as steam finished so there wasn't much diesel hauled freight apart from a dwindling number of through trains.  The diesels I remember seeing most of on that line were class 31s, although I was quite young at the time!

Along with the Brush 2s were BR Type 2s mainly the skinhead type from both the ER and LMR (LNWR), sometimes a MR based later version or a BRCW Type2. The MR locos mainly worked the Goldington coal trains.

 

The Bedford to Bletchley part of the line (and the bit to OXford) saw loads of different types of loco, including Westerns. They would at times work as far as Bedford on stone trains. We would all be at Midland Road station and someone would arrive saying there was a Western at St Johns. Off we would charge to see it, it was always I had seen. On returning to Midland Road we would find out that a 55A Peak I hadn't seen had just gone northwards.

Link to post
Share on other sites

hello

 

what about heavy weathered steam locomotive been running last duties before gone to barrys scrapyard

 

I am aware to small loco to medium loco

BR take over in uk

ex- LMS jinty 0-6-0 ,

ex- GWR 45 2-6-2 , 56 0-6-2 , Pannier Tank 0-6-0 ,

BR 3Mt 2-6-2 ,

 

Short distance branch line by which suitable steam locomotives of which class and which region

 

because i will buy some steam locomotives for my branch line

 

thank you

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium

As I remember, (and I stand to be corrected!) the last steam locos to run (in 1968) were mainly ex-LMS, with BR Standards making up the balance.

Black 5s, 8Fs, Standard 4 & 5 4-6-0s, 9Fs being the last ones of all (plus one Britannia, no.70013).

The last Standard 4MTs worked the Grassington branch (LMR, near Skipton) which was freight only and served a quarry (or was it a lime works?)

Small/medium tank locos all disappeared during 1967 with the withdrawal of the last Jinties (LMR), J94s (LMR again, confined to the Cromford & High Peak line), Fairburn, Stanier & Standard 2-6-4Ts (LMR and possibly Scotland as well). Ivatt 2MTs and various other Standard tanks also survived on the Southern until 1967 (but that's probably not of any interest to you).

GWR locos were all withdrawn by the end of '65, apart from a few panniers and maybe some 56xx tanks which lasted into early '66 in the Midlands and parts of Wales. The 45xx prairies were really passenger engines and the last few disappeared in 1964.

 

I really think you'd be best determining your location and then looking at what would be seen in the area. By the mid-60s, large parts of the UK were completely steam free - if, for example, you chose East Anglia, any time after mid 1963 would pretty much exclude steam, except for maybe the odd industrial loco and the area around March.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As I remember, (and I stand to be corrected!) the last steam locos to run (in 1968) were mainly ex-LMS, with BR Standards making up the balance.

Black 5s, 8Fs, Standard 4 & 5 4-6-0s, 9Fs being the last ones of all (plus one Britannia, no.70013).

The last Standard 4MTs worked the Grassington branch (LMR, near Skipton) which was freight only and served a quarry (or was it a lime works?)

Small/medium tank locos all disappeared during 1967 with the withdrawal of the last Jinties (LMR), J94s (LMR again, confined to the Cromford & High Peak line), Fairburn, Stanier & Standard 2-6-4Ts (LMR and possibly Scotland as well). Ivatt 2MTs and various other Standard tanks also survived on the Southern until 1967 (but that's probably not of any interest to you).

GWR locos were all withdrawn by the end of '65, apart from a few panniers and maybe some 56xx tanks which lasted into early '66 in the Midlands and parts of Wales. The 45xx prairies were really passenger engines and the last few disappeared in 1964.

 

I really think you'd be best determining your location and then looking at what would be seen in the area. By the mid-60s, large parts of the UK were completely steam free - if, for example, you chose East Anglia, any time after mid 1963 would pretty much exclude steam, except for maybe the odd industrial loco and the area around March.

thank you tell me everything about steam locomotive end of era
Link to post
Share on other sites

Medium steam locomotive like black five been running on branch line of terminus but some terminus station have no turntable and possible running backward of steam locomotive?

On several lines locos like Black 5s worked tender first a lot of the time.

South West Scotland was a typical location where they worked like this.

Bernard

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...