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Bottom of the Barrel


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During lockdown I decided to improve on my last brewery layout (Gone for a Burton), as with everything, you improve or hope to, the more practice you get. With work well under way on Bottom of the Barrel I have decided to show you all what I've been up to. I was lucky enough to invest in a cricut cutter which has helped no end and allowing me to produce everything from windows to tanks and brewing equipment. the first building I produced with help of a cricutter was a tube station for my dads home layout of london. This worked well and was a great test to allow me to see what I could produce.  

 

The first Building I have made is the Brew house, this is based on The Trent Brewery in burton on trent, which still exists today but as housing. The history of the brewery is a complex one, owned and built in 1881 by Thomas Sykes. By 1893, Sykes had ceased brewing in burton, and the brewery became the Trent brewery company, after just 3 years Trent Brewery company entered voluntary liquidation. In 1898 Everards of leicester took over the lease, where they continued to brew until 1983. In 1984 it became the Heritage Brewery Museum, which closed in 1995. then owned for two short periods by Bevvied Bull Brewery (1998-1999), and lastly Burton Old Cottage Brewery (2000-2001) it finally closed becoming housing in 2010. 

 

I have decided for it to remain the Trent Brewery Company, and in an alternative history, they did not go into liquidation. But continued to brew well into the next century, maintaining good relationships with local brewers who they contract bottle for and purchase malt from. This will allow a wide variety of traffic and use of stock from my previous layout (Gone for a Burton). 

 

Over the upcoming posts I hope to update you with the progress. 

 

Cheers Joe 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Woebegone-by-sea
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I started by designing my building for Cutting on my Cricut, I decided to use it for cutting the Mount board and the styrene sheet to test its capabilities. I found the thicker the material the simpler the cut the better, where as thinner materials could cope with more complex cuts. I drew it all out on the Cricut's software, which mainly uses basic shapes, but you can slice and weld shapes together to form more complicated ones. In terms of the Cricut I can highly recommend, especially if you are familiar with working with shapes on Microsoft word or Inkscape. The Cutter allows precise cuts of repetitive shapes and allows time to begin assembly of other items.

 

Now the Building starts to take shape and received its red primer ready for brick painting. 

 

Cheers Joe

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Woebegone-by-sea
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Excellent piece of modelling, I am in the process of building a few warehouses out of scratch aid kits, even with these it takes time when you alter (kit bash) them 

 

I am looking forward to seeing them and the layout evolve. In an earlier thread a couple of years ago photos of Benskins Brewery railway system in Watford which was very interesting as if weaved into various buildings 

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Excellent piece of modelling, I am in the process of building a few warehouses out of scratch aid kits, even with these it takes time when you alter (kit bash) them 

 

I am looking forward to seeing them and the layout evolve. In an earlier thread a couple of years ago photos of Benskins Brewery railway system in Watford which was very interesting as if weaved into various buildings 

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On 22/01/2022 at 21:27, TechnicArrow said:

That's looking excellent! Did you use the cutter on the brick plasticard too or was that done by hand? Either way that looks like some speedy progress on a unique building, I'm somewhat envious :D

 Thankyou, I used the cutter to cut the larger pieces of plasticard, which it cut well, and was particularly good for cutting window openings. The main proportion of time is spent drawing out the cut lines and then assembly, smaller and more complex cuts are done by hand. Although it may seem quick progress it has been evolving over the last 6 months, however I felt that it was better to write it in snippits. 

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5 hours ago, hayfield said:

Excellent piece of modelling, I am in the process of building a few warehouses out of scratch aid kits, even with these it takes time when you alter (kit bash) them 

 

I am looking forward to seeing them and the layout evolve. In an earlier thread a couple of years ago photos of Benskins Brewery railway system in Watford which was very interesting as if weaved into various buildings 

Thank you for your kind comments, you cant beat a good kit bash and can make some amazing building as unique as scratch buildings. I'm quite lucky as I have time due to working shifts, however this causes problems attending shows! I will have a look for the Benskins article, thankyou for the heads up, I always find brewery railways interesting. 

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Good Morning all, once I had completed putting the bricks onto the main card structure, I primed the building with Halfords Red Lead, and then began to paint the bricks using Humbrol Brick, once complete I began to pick out separate bricks using different colours, which I mixed on a pallet, varying from light to dark.

 

When I'd finished painting I began the roofs construction, I cut this by hand and tried different angles in attempts to get it right. I initially thought that I had got it right, but after studying photo's of the prototype I decided that the angle was to steep and required some adjustment, I pulled the roof a part and adjusted the angle until it looked right. The roof angle now looks right, and so, I produced the raised wooden section. Then I built the louvers up, test fitted and primed them ready for top coat. These can be seen in place, finally I painted the raised wooden section of the roof. Next design and placement of the equipment within the low relief brewhouse, fermenting room and boiler house. 

 

Thanks For Reading

Joe

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Woebegone-by-sea
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The Interior of the Brewhouse was constructed separately so each floor and could be removed and slotted back in. The windows were then added, these are produced from matt white vinyl which was cut on the cricut machine and then placed on clear acetate. Finally I wired up all the 3V L.E.D lighting.

 

Once the Brewhouse was Complete, I was able to begin work on the packaging operation, the brewery will have a cask line and a bottling line. The Cask line is below the Fermenting room and I have constructed the conveyors from mountboard and plastic strip, with connected platforms for inspection and dry hopping, along with rotation tables to allow the casks to alter direction. Once complete I added a Racker (cask filling machine) complete with its Jack Back (header tank). The cask is loaded onto the conveyor and runs round to the first station where its inspected after cleaning outside, then it moves round to the Racker. Where the Racker man fills the cask by placing one of the three filling heads into a cask and opening the valve, once filled, hops are added if necessary, then a bung hammered in to seal it. Finally it moves down the ramp on the end of the line to be rolled out the building and either loaded or transferred to the cellar under the dock.

 

Next I moved onto the boiler room. I ordered 3 3D printed boiler loads which I set into brickwork, and detailed with pipes, safety valves, pressure and level gauges and grates. Once painted I then drilled the the two fire tubes out on the first boiler and fitted some fire effect L.E.D's. Lastly coal and a Model U Figure is placed in the boiler house. 

 

Thanks for Reading.

Joe

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Woebegone-by-sea
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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Hi All, I felt It was about time for an update, although there may seem limited progress, In the background I have started building the models surround and baseboard, I aim to show you this once complete.

 

In this Post I just wanted to update you on the signage. In the arches above the boiler house I felt it important to pay a bit of homage to two of burtons biggest brands and brewers that I have a close connection with, along with these two I decided to add Everard's Logo as a nod to the Breweries history as in real life, as eventually the brewery was taken over by Everard's. Having a Bottling facility allows a bigger variety of traffic in and out of the brewery, as well as the flexibility to display a variety of signage. The signage is all cut on card on the Cricut machine, and although it does cut well, I find the image is better reversed with high fidelity files. I.e. outer edge downwards. I cut several to ensure I was able to pick the best out. I then made up some square plastruct angle iron type frames, to allow the signage to be held away from the building. Glued together with plastic magic, then painted with black spray paint and weathered to indicate some light rust with weathering powders. I then attached to signs/ logos and again weathered to give it a more realistic appearance finally all sealed in with Matt Lacquer. The Trent Brewery signage was completed in the same fashion only this time using slaters Styrene letters. 

 

The Brewery building is now complete with signage and the later addition of a sack hoist. now I move onto the task of the baseboard and then further Buildings. 

 

Cheers For Now

Joe

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