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GWR 3511 Class


JimC

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240-3501StellaTank.jpg.7686657b90a089468da967b0fc9f9ee0.jpgNot to be confused with the 0-4-2T 3521s that ended up as 4-4-0s, these were 2-4-0Ts that ended up as 2-4-0s.  Built in 1885, the ten double framed 3511 2-4-0Ts were a tank engine version of the Stella class 2-4-0s, a part of a Dean standardisation exercise that also included the 2361 outside frame version of the Dean Goods and the 1661 0-6-0ST. All had major components in common. They were a much larger engine than the Metros with 17in by 26in cylinders and class P (Dean Goods) boilers. Originally (as shown) they carried condensing apparatus for use in the Severn Tunnel. 3501-10 were similar, but built as convertibles for the broad gauge.  The 3511 series lost tanks and gained tenders to become additional members of the Stella class in 1894/5.

 

This sketch was quite a challenge. I started it because I was given a couple of blueprints of weight diagrams of the class, but when I came to trace the blueprints the frames just didn't look right to me against photographs. I've decided, on *very* limited evidence, that the running plate on the drawings is a little too low, and so I lifted it and now I think it better matches photographs. 

 

Sketch updated 1st Feb

 

Edited by JimC
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Dammit, why didn't I find that? I have a copy of that photo from RCTS, but much worse quality. 

 

[later] especially as you'd already posted it in this blog!

 

Edited by JimC
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Quote

This sketch was quite a challenge. I started it because I was given a couple of blueprints of weight diagrams of the class, but when I came to trace the blueprints the frames just didn't look right to me against photographs. I've decided, on *very* limited evidence, that the running plate on the drawings is a little too low, and so I lifted it and now I think it better matches photographs. 

 

As you and others have taught me, weight diagrams can be quite unreliable. This has made me wonder how they were actually done. Simply a quick sketch by eye, glancing at the proper drawings? 

 

 

On 31/01/2022 at 20:53, Miss Prism said:

3516-medium.jpg.fe680bd9e7e1c64fb31cc5fac776cd1f.jpg

 

 

Nice lamp. 

 

Edited by Mikkel
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My guess is it depends. 

Weight diagrams for major classes are often very well drawn. Some of the ones for one off absorbed are sketchy in the extreme. 

 

Something rather interesting - to me at least - passed through my hands recently, which was 4 or 5 weight diagram like drawings of absorbed Welsh classes about 5 inches wide. They'd been drawn by A E 'Dusty' Durrant who was a Swindon Apprentice and draughtsman. What was interesting is that they were dated, and the dates were in the middle of his apprenticeship. Holcroft, Durrant etc are strong on what they did during the day and weak on the evening classes where they were taught draughtsmanship and presumably engineering maths and it now occurs to me that weight diagram like drawings would be an obvious training exercise. 

And I've just realised I have a email contact with an ex Swindon drawing office draughtsman. I had better ask, hadn't I!

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