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Messing about with trains


Mikkel

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‘Mess about’ 
[British, informal]

> to spend time doing things that are not useful or serious: to waste time

Merriam-Webster dictionary 

 

Here’s a 1½ minute video showing my new traverser in action. Or frankly: Just a bloke enjoying his layouts. The trains run daily at the moment, maybe it’s operating in a living room environment that makes it a more natural and sociable part of my daily routine.  To my surprise, I hardly miss my man cave in the old house.

 

Not to everyone’s tastes I’m sure, but I’m enjoying it :)

 

 

 

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Lovely seeing the Dean Goods in action - the fixed shots towards the end are so authentic looking- bravo!

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Thanks. Maybe it's edited too hard, I have some longer shots of the trains just moving back and forth. I can never seem to find the balance between too short and too long clips. 

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Cracking stuff Mikkel... 

 

Nicely composed video with a suitable backing track.

 

Great to see the traverser in action and some lovely smooth running. 

 

Like others have said nice to see the Dean Goods in action. It looks at home. 

 

Cheers, 

 

Mark 

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Mikkel

Posted (edited)

Thanks Mark. The backing track is from the Youtube music library.  It was the closest I could find to "Shake, Rattle and Roll", which is copyrighted of course:

 

 

Edited by Mikkel
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Many thanks, and yes the latter part is indeed filmed in the grounds of the old North & South Jct Rwy. The GWR gobbled up the entire railway and converted their station to a goods yard. 

 

Confusingly the layout used to be called The Sidings, but is now referred to as the Old Yard to match the, er,  evolving backstory of Farthing.

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Operating in a corner of the living room? Could I get away with that?? You’re a lucky man, as well as a skilled one.

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4 hours ago, Dave John said:

Looks like good fun. Those traverser slides move really well . 

 

 

Yes, I'm very happy with the slides, a good deal better than the drawer slides I tried once.

 

1 hour ago, Northroader said:

Operating in a corner of the living room? Could I get away with that?? You’re a lucky man, as well as a skilled one.

 

I'm slowly, gradually expanding. The other day I mentioned in passing that it would be nice to have a longer desk. No pushback yet.

 

If your current "changing backscenes" scheme is a bit too big, maybe you could get away with a small variant?

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20 hours ago, Mikkel said:

Thanks. Maybe it's edited too hard, I have some longer shots of the trains just moving back and forth. I can never seem to find the balance between too short and too long clips. 

 

Loved it as was...but I would love it even more if there was even more to love... 

 

:)

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10 hours ago, Mikkel said:

Many thanks, and yes the latter part is indeed filmed in the grounds of the old North & South Jct Rwy. The GWR gobbled up the entire railway and converted their station to a goods yard. 

 

Confusingly the layout used to be called The Sidings, but is now referred to as the Old Yard to match the, er,  evolving backstory of Farthing.

 

Mikkel,

You mean none of this is real?  I have been searching for Farthing on the map for ages!  I thought it was just down the line from Bedwyn.  :D

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3 hours ago, Schooner said:

 

Loved it as was...but I would love it even more if there was even more to love... 

 

Thanks, will keep that in mind. Maybe no music either!

 

2 hours ago, ChrisN said:

 

Mikkel,

You mean none of this is real?  I have been searching for Farthing on the map for ages!  I thought it was just down the line from Bedwyn.  :D

 

It is! You must have missed it. There's even a map, drawn up by that Tolkien fellow.

 

shire_map.jpg.189bf6a4a06174adfa877396e5f40b5e.jpg

 

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I am biased but to me the Dean Goods and the new traverser look great ,superb work.I now have the vallejo colours you suggested on an earlier entry and I agree it flows very well. I won't have as much trouble painting my coach panels in future. Is there another kit or R-T-R bash in the wings? 

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8 hours ago, gwr517 said:

I am biased but to me the Dean Goods and the new traverser look great ,superb work.I now have the vallejo colours you suggested on an earlier entry and I agree it flows very well. I won't have as much trouble painting my coach panels in future. Is there another kit or R-T-R bash in the wings? 

 

Thanks, and good to hear that the paints are working out OK. Funny you should ask about loco projects, I've been working on a couple today, an 1813 and the good old Hornby 2721. Both will have a Bachmann chassis. 

 

2 hours ago, Corbs said:

Love it!

 

Thanks Corbs, I'm working my way through some of your build videos and am really enjoying them.

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You can't keep a good modeller down as they should say. I will await the results Mikkel.

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Hi Mikkel,

Long time since I last commented, but I was researching railway accidents (as you do) and came across this leaflet: https://www.railwaymuseum.org.uk/sites/default/files/2018-04/the-safety-movement-1914-LOW.pdf?_ga=2.60822444.1812258583.1594485049-478566534.1594485049 which instantly made me think of your fantastic "posed" dioramas.  This is kind of life imitating art, with a bit of time travel thrown in!  If you've already seen it, then this is just by way of a hello and happy modelling anyway! Best, Matt

Edited by LSWRlinesider
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What's the wagon on p. 16? A wood-framed 4-plank with 3-plank high side door and wooden brake blocks. My first thought is that it is a hired wagon but what's with the 6"-ish G . W and the script Factory? It would make some senses as a works internal user wagon, as the photo is presumably take there - note the shiny claret carriage in the background, fresh out of the paint shop, I presume.

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Mikkel

Posted (edited)

16 hours ago, LSWRlinesider said:

Hi Mikkel,

Long time since I last commented, but I was researching railway accidents (as you do) and came across this leaflet: https://www.railwaymuseum.org.uk/sites/default/files/2018-04/the-safety-movement-1914-LOW.pdf?_ga=2.60822444.1812258583.1594485049-478566534.1594485049 which instantly made me think of your fantastic "posed" dioramas.  This is kind of life imitating art, with a bit of time travel thrown in!  If you've already seen it, then this is just by way of a hello and happy modelling anyway! Best, Matt

 

Many thanks Matt! I have seen parts of this before, but not the whole publication I think. Quite a resource, and as you say a great source of cameos if anyone is in need.

 

The style is certainly more direct than today's H&S communication! A tad condescending perhaps, but also with a good deal of humor, eg:

 

image.png.b2843e364ecf44fb24d46cfdb5f49282.png

 

 

13 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

What's the wagon on p. 16? A wood-framed 4-plank with 3-plank high side door and wooden brake blocks. My first thought is that it is a hired wagon but what's with the 6"-ish G . W and the script Factory? It would make some senses as a works internal user wagon, as the photo is presumably take there - note the shiny claret carriage in the background, fresh out of the paint shop, I presume.

 

Yes that's a bit of an oddity, especially as the copyright for the publication is 1914, so nothing to do with the later small-sized scripts.  Your logic makes good sense. Or perhaps hired to a private factory, maybe not even a GWR build? 

 

Then there were the china clay wagons, which right from the early days seem to have been a motley lot and with various non-standard lettering to be seen.  

 

Edited by Mikkel
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Yes, I'm struck by that too. The pages that precede  the final summary show details of the accidents in individual departments (though the method by which the data was compiled isn't clear). 

 

I note 33 injuries by horses in a month, that's around 400 in a year. 

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