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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/10/13 in all areas

  1. I don't think there's any part of the hobby I like more than adding small details to a nearly finished scene, in this case some of Hornby's delightfully rendered wicker baskets and (just out of shot) some Bachmann's equally useful milk churns grouped around the front of the station building. It's a small touch, and really just open-the-box modelling, but I find it really enjoyable to add these kind of features - it's the kind of modelling you can do at at the end of a busy or stressful day and still feel like you're getting somewhere - 5 minute heroes as PMP puts it. Next up will be some seats
    12 points
  2. For the building of Fanshawe Ltd I needed a rain pipe to hid the join in the alley. I already made a rain pipe using a 1,2 mm rod from Evergreen for a house on Nice Street. A texture is glued around this. For the warehouse I wanted to use a square Victorian rain pipe. I wanted to create it myself using a self-made texture. My journey on the internet began. I learned a lot of new English words connected to rain drainage. Finally I found a picture by CG textures that was usable. The white arrow is pointed to the rain pipe of choice. Then I started to create my texture
    3 points
  3. I have mentioned before in this blog that my layout includes an 009 narrow-gauge section. Most of this section does not need changing in order to fit in with my revised 19th-century timeframe but, a long time ago (1980), I built a 'Centre Models' kit of a Leek & Manifold 2-6-4T, of which the prototypes appeared in 1904. Whilst not quite fitting my new era, it is a handsome locomotive that I had never got to run well, so I decided to re-build the chassis. A body kit is still available from Meridian Models The original kit included a fret of nickel-silver valve gear, which was extremely
    2 points
  4. Spent a little session on the Hunslet this morning fitting the DCC decoder and wiring up the speakers. I had already fitted the speakers into the tanks and the chip went in the bunker. I am only going to wire up one speaker, the other is there as a spare as although it would be possible to get to them it would not be easy. The only thing that won't fit in the bunker is the capacitor which I have put up in the top of the fire box. I have run the wires below the foot plate inside some black heat shrink so although not invisible they will hardly be noticeable from normal viewing angles. Only real
    2 points
  5. Hi. More on real stone modelling. After all the personalised walls it was time to look at something a bit more challenging. At the time we were living at Keighley just a stones throw (no pun intended) from Bronte Country. In the end it came down to "Top Withens" the remote, now derelict farmstead on the moors above Haworth. Not to build it in this state but as near as possible as it was. Maudie and I did several trips to the building to measure the ground plan and try and calculate the slope of the hillside it was built on. I would mention it's a couple of miles from the nearest point w
    2 points
  6. Well a quick update, I recently went to the Model Railway show in Manchester with a small shopping list for Ingleside (don't we all when we go to a show?). So having purchased some cork for a track bed, kadee magnets for uncoupling and some buffer stops I thought I was sorted and then as ever I started looking at the rest of the trade stands. I saw some decent mouldings for industrial buildings on the Ten Commandments stand, now this is relevant to Carter's Dock one of the two layouts I am upgrading. I had been planning on using Skytrex north light factory units to cover the flat back scene
    2 points
  7. Well time for this entry which I hope will be of some interest. Please do not take my basic approach as too simple as there is a need for simplicity in regards to such construction. My choice of material is 1/2" ply wood. This stuff is a great invention as it has built in strength thus no need for bracing and reinforcement. For sturdiness in the boards a depth in the side rails of around 20% top width should be sufficient thus 1 foot wide boards needs 2 1/2" rails. A 2' wide board requires at least 4" rails.Anything less will sag. The 3 basic rules of cabinet making are measure everythin
    1 point
  8. 3863 - Hornby conversion As previously mentioned at the weekend, I have been working on converting 3863 to P4. The initial conversion at the weekend showed that the crank pin nuts on the lead axel fouled the crosshead, and that the drive gear was loose on the axle. I initially attempted to cure the latter with an application of loctight, however it still persisted. I have now stripped it down and attempted to resolve through the application of additional knurling to the axle (attacking with a xuron cutter) which appears to have done the trick. The lead crank pin nuts were filed
    1 point
  9. Some prototypes are just too much for we mere mortals to resist, even if we can’t completely justify them… This is a Stephen Harris 35T GLW class ‘B’ tank that I’ve been working on (very slowly) over the summer. My original plan was to build three class ‘A’s and one class ‘B’. I thought I’d do the class ‘B’ first as a one-off. While there is plenty of evidence of 35T class ‘A’ Esso tanks in Cornwall, I have not seen any photos of class ‘B’ tanks so had no good reason to splash out on a class 'B' kit or (even less) a set of transfers for four class 'B's but I do think that the phot
    1 point
  10. I should like to say that I had managed to make this, but I'm too busy making a mess of other models and painting pictures! As there has been some adverse comment in the 0 Guild Gazette on DMR kits I thought that I would post this picture to say that if you get a competent modeller these kits make for a lovely resulting loco! The chap who made this had not done LNER lined green livery before, so purists will note that there are a few bits of lining missing, but that would be very picky! He has made his own compensation system and the loco runs perfectly, well worth the 2 year wait! I hop
    1 point
  11. Time to finally start laying track and I decided that I needed to start with probably the most critical bit of the formation, the single slip and turnout into the loop. The template from Templot showed these a 1:8 crossings, which is actually the shallowest diamond that you can have apparently. Anyone who has ever made a diamond crossing will tell you the most difficult bit is making the obtuse crossings - they are a pig to get right. That said after spending the whole of Friday evening turning the air blue (sorry Brian!) I managed to get them to my satisfaction. I've made the track off th
    1 point
  12. Manage to do a little more. I have carried on with the two sets of frames, the inner set will be painted very shortly and set up to be run in. First up the castings were added to the front, they went to gether quite well, no major problems. The one buffer looks droopy in the photo so I need to checj that. You can now see how the small angle holds the sandpipe. At the rear the brake cross shaft, bearings and cylinders have been added, there are the fuel tank filler pipes etc still to be added. The buffers are ones I had in the scrap box, as only three were in the parts
    1 point
  13. My small layout includes a building representing a creamery, so I have been considering the traffic needed to serve this facility. I remembered that I had an old K's plastic kit of a six-wheel low Siphon, which had been put on one side as it had no chance of negotiating my small-radius curves. Looking at this model again (30 years after building it!), I think it is an attractive vehicle, representing the earlier low-roof Siphon, with only two doors each side. I intend to change the roof to an earlier single-arc design and apply an earlier style of lettering but the main problem is how
    1 point
  14. Last month I paid what was only my second visit to my local preserved railway: The Swindon and Cricklade Railway. The weekend of 14th and 15th September was the railways Wartime Weekend. And as one of my mates, who I also play cricket with, was taking his WW2 American truck along, it was an idea chance for a visit. There was no mainline loco on loan at the S&CR this summer so Andrew Barclay 0-6-0ST "Salmon" was doing the duties. Seen here approaching Blunsdon with a rake of four maroon BR MK1s from Hayes Knoll. Salmon upon arrival at Blunsdon. Running around at Taw Valley H
    1 point
  15. Just a quick update on the T9. The boiler, smoke box and firebox have all been rolled up as per the instructions. I haven't done this bit before so a lot of care was taken and I took my time. The end results are shown in the photos and I'm pretty pleased with how it turned out. The T9 will have to wait for a while before I make any further progress as I really need to concentrate on the new layout Clevedon over the coming months and its first show in January.
    1 point
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