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  1. I've been thinking that railway modelling needs a better public image. People seem to think the hobby is a bit weird and nerdy, when really we’re a bunch of smooth adrenaline junkies. Here are some examples from my own awesome life. Firstly, we railway modellers have really cool gear. These DIY tamping and scribing tools were made from coffee stirrers and my wife’s discarded sock knitting needles. Max bling! The top three are for smoothing DAS between sleepers and under rails. I use Latex gloves to help seal glue containers. Aft
    39 points
  2. A damp Sunday morning at Porthmadog shed. GWR 43xx No.6324 stands outside Porthmadog loco shed, a sub-shed of Machynlleth 89C. The two road structure was built by the Cambrian Railways in 1907 and survived until August 1963. This is a box fresh Dapol Mogul and awaits light weathering, renumbering and reallocating to 89C. This is the second of the dioramas built for Modelu by Dan Evason of Tunnel Lane Model Railways and is photographed in natural light.
    21 points
  3. Two members of a set of 5 Accurascale hoppers to be finished differently. A bit of a challenge, but I thought that if I tackled each one completely separately I ought to be in with a chance of success. I selected the paints and pigments before I started and will restrict what I use to just those choices. Railmatch Sleeper Grime Railmatch Roof Dirt AMMO Dark Earth pigment AMMO Russian Earth pigment Revell Matt Enamel No. 84 MIG Dark Mud pigment There is still work to be done on both, but progress is being made.
    9 points
  4. Anyone who has read any of my infrequent recent blogs or worse spoken to me, will know that nothing at all has happened on the modelling front for several months due the long over due and rather complicated decorating projects that have been going on. Unfortunately I have not completely finished as our house id a definite Forth Bridge sort of project but I am at the stage where I can take a well earned pause. While I was decorating the lounge the contents were decanted into the newly decorated study and as it is actually quite cosy in there very little has been put back as yet. The more deviou
    8 points
  5. A touch-up job this time. A friend had fitted sound, crew, coal and working lamp to this Jinty and removed paint from the coupling rods and brake gear in doing so. A half-cupful of Railmatch sleeper grime, weathered black and matt black soon sorted out that little problem.
    8 points
  6. It occurred to me that I could do something about making initial airbrushing tasks a bit easier with these models. Most of the photographs that I have been working from show much corrosion on the strengthening ribs all around the hopper body, and for the first couple of examples I airbrushed these freehand and didn't worry too much about the slight overspray that got onto the panels. For the third example I cut out a piece of 2mm greyboard to use as a mask that would allow me to airbrush just the ribs without getting overspray on the panels. It work
    7 points
  7. Taking onboard the comments on the mound I added the best part of another couple of inches to the top. I also altered the shape to I hope better match the rather pointed shape of the original. I've added an initial layer of static grass and made a couple of trial little bits of wall from Sculptamold (I just wanted to see if I could make a wall with it, I need to get the shapes better) I've got the goods shed bedded in a bit better (obviously still needs windows, capping stones etc. etc.) and also added the 3d printed yard crane in place. I don't think it looks too bad.
    7 points
  8. With my initial success of my high lighting mast under my belt I set forth today to install a lot more lighting. I wanted the lighting under the bridge to represent sodium lighting which is typical of the prototype so installed a couple of LEDs in there and did my best to cover up the wiring from view. (yellow lights installed in under bridge) So far so good. Next was the Linkspan proper. I wanted white light on this as looking at prototype night shots from Dover it's all white lighting on the linkspans to give the best light in these dangerous areas.
    5 points
  9. I was pleased to get a comment from Mikkel on the subdued colours I had used on the engine shed. Despite not achieving his amazing standards I thought I would share how I do it. Subdued colours are something I am aiming for on the layout as I always like the layouts with subdued colours at shows. On the engine shed I used The Gimp to subdue the colour of the printed Scalescenes Red Brick, however on the other areas and all over the rest of the layout I use pastels. I have two sets that I rely on: The Black to White set is from a high street branch of The Works having s
    4 points
  10. A quick run down on materials used for the engine shed. Outside bricks: Scalescenes Red Brick TX01 with the colour dulled down using The Gimp Inside white washed bricks: Scalescenes Painted Brick TX05 Guttering: Ratio Guttering & Drainpipes Doors: Ratio Doors with the arched tops removed with a razor saw Roof: York Modelmaking Slates N-Tiles01 Windows: Scene-Setters Glazing Bars 3x4mm - I got these at a show. They are not currently listed on the website as they are rebuilding the site. I made the frames look more worn and ye
    3 points
  11. After a long hiatus for the summer progress has continued a little. The engine shed has been largely finished for some time but I put the internal white washed bricks in this week to finish the job. The engine shed will be adjacent to the coaling stage, to which I am adding coal now! It is not modelled on a prototype. It is however in the GWR style with similarities to Tetbury without the water tower, or a shorter version of Wallingford. A view looking inside a little. The camera never lies; having seen the images I took for the b
    3 points
  12. Not much time to progress over the last few days but before I did too much more I wanted to get some lighting in to ensure I could cover up the wiring fairly easily. My first go at the high masts was with a yellow LED to represent a sodium bulb. Unfortunately having tried it out there wasn't enough light coming out of it for the effect I wanted and I didn't have enough room in my brass rod to get any more LEDs. Initial trial with a yellow bulb. Can you spot the light?!) For the top of the light mast I tried a cut down bottle top. The first one whils
    3 points
  13. In 1884 the GWR centralized the provision of provender, so that every stable block on the system received a regular supply by rail from the provender store at Didcot, typically every 1-2 weeks. The supplies consisted of hay, chaff, straw bedding and sacks of feed. The feed included oats, beans and maize, either pre-mixed or separate. The sizeable stable block at Farthing obviously needs a regular supply of feed and bedding, so two provender wagons have been made. I began with a diagram Q1, using the Coopercraft kit. The GWR only made a total o
    2 points
  14. Having learnt my lessons from yesterday I carried on with the lighting. Trying to get as much wiring done as possible so it could be hidden by the remainder of the landscaping. The first item tackled was the Linkspan winding house. I had left the roof removable when I had first made it to allow lighting to be fitted later on. I wanted a white light shining down to illuminate the bridge immediately beneath the winding house along with my first try with fibre optics to provide some lighting around the walkway. (hand drilling holes for the fibre optics)
    2 points
  15. Who hangs on to old tins of paint, wherein gloopy remains stick to the bottom? I have an old tin of Humbrol 27004 Metalcote Gunmetal, most of which was used for airbrushing onto wheels and smokeboxes in a black/gunmetal mixture. During a search for suitable buffer head grease I found that the otherwise unusable pigment that remained in the bottom of an improperly closed tinlet had an interesting property. A lump of this goo was attached to a buffer head, smeared about a bit and left to dry. Once dry, it was gently buffed to bring out the metallic sheen. On 1444 I have used this sim
    2 points
  16. Current progress with my 7mm representation of Ryde Pier Head Signal Box. Inside parts from Springside models. Hopefully the photos are in the right order.
    2 points
  17. And so to painting and finishing. First off was to pop out to the garden and spray it with good old Hafords etch primer (the can's about eight years old and still going strong). Before I did this I intended to mask the lamp 'lenses' with a bit of Blue Tac but forgot. I got away with it. The signal was then appropriately decorated. The black is possibly a bit shinier that intended, I'm going with having a very keen S&T Dept rather than mess about. The grey is just the aforementioned Halfords Primer. I messed about for ages (earlier posts) trying to find the 'perfect' grey/aluminium colour a
    2 points
  18. Just been down the A14 to Ipswich for a site visit; surprising amount of traffic on the roads, even early in the morning. Huge tailback of traffic N of Bury St Edmunds, at least it was on the other side. Stopped at Starbucks on the way back, and needn’t have bothered. The signs might say “come in, we are OPEN!” but they aren’t, just as take-away and why bother with that? Very various interpretations of procedures. Stopped for fuel at a major chain, and the cashiers were working behind a single screen, no masks with a notice proclaiming that was “in accordance with gov
    1 point
  19. Well some more items are slowly getting finished.. A while ago I acquired a DJH Duchess .. named as "City of Liverpool" the name didn't match the loco/tender combination.. (Duchesses and City locos and tenders are a mine field) Eventually I bought some Fox nameplates for "City of Leicester" a very camera shy loco. This has been "shed cleaned" but I notice I have not finished - I need a bit of dirt on the top of the boiler cladding (where you can't reach it easily). It has a high level gear box and a Mashima in it and it can pull almost everything it has
    1 point
  20. Hi all, I thought this would be a quick upgrade project! I got a bargain diagram O33 Lima Siphon G at an exhibition last year. When I got home, I checked what GWR.org say on it - incorrect bogies - well that should be easy. Looking in the Siphon Bible by Jack Slinn, it could be one of four types with 9' Pressed Steel making up 75% of them. Many of them were converted to other types after WWII so watch out for that. O59 is easy - just add shell vents x11. M34 is shell vents + plated over Louvres. The Lima body has wider planks than normal. There is a side on
    1 point
  21. I wanted to embed some of the narrow gauge rails in cobbles, but unusually for the internet i couldn't find a method which seemed to provide an effective end-result. The most common ways are either to use embossed sheet or modelling clay to fill between the sleepers. As far as i could see neither method provides a clean edge to the gap that the wheel flanges run in and often leave the sleepers visible, which breaks the illusion of a buried rail. Therefore, i wanted to add an additional rail next to the running rails to simulate the tram-like look and give a clean edge. Testing sho
    1 point
  22. With the LED now fixed in the lamp, the leads got fed down the post. I half expected them to get caught up on the rod providing the pivot for the counter balance, but all went swimmingly. Twisting them together may have helped. The camera's really struggling close-ups today, wrong phase of the moon or something. And then the lamp was glued on, making sure it lines up with the spectacle lens holes. Followed by the track circuit plaque. I placed this as per the instructions, but I feel it's a bit low. Maybe another GWR/BR)WR) thing. I've concluded it c
    1 point
  23. This weekend was a chance to finish off painting the asphalt and to make a start on getting all the road lining and decals down. Ferry terminals seem to be covered with white yellow and red lining of different sorts so out with the acrylic pens and bendy ruler to start marking it all on. (marking on the top road lines first using the bendy ruler for the corners.) (I then marked out a chevron where the two routes split before marking the lines down the ramp.) The ramp road crosses the railway at the bottom. Due to the dockside industrial nature I
    1 point
  24. Almost there now. Some MIG Dark Mud pigment has been used to indicate the beginnings of surface corrosion on the chimney, and some Gunmetal metallic pigment has been used to indicate the beginnings of shiny handrail portions in the most used areas. Small amounts are crucial to the success of this type of effect. All pigment applications were done with a filbert brush. Only one more day to go.
    1 point
  25. Out of the box this locomotive has a rather shiny smokebox, much more so than I would have expected. Before going any further I decided to apply a layer of Testor's Dullcote to that area so that pigments could be applied at a later date and that I could be sure that they would stick. Dullcote dries very quickly into a usable state. These photographs were taken only two minutes apart. My masking wasn't very good, so the Dullcote has landed on part of the leading wheels. I'll need to load up the airbrush to cover that small patch with another lay
    1 point
  26. It's the turn of the airbrush now. The inderframe will be discoloured using Railmatch Sleeper Grime, applied with an Iwata Eclipse SBS. The driven wheels are turned while the paint is sprayed, to prevent there being a patchy finish to the rims. With N Gauge and OO/HO Gauge engines this can be done with a PP9 battery, but this doesn't work with O Gauge. I use two pieces of scrap OO Gauge rail screwed into place through a piece of wiring terminal block set at the width of the wheel treads and bent to the width of the battery terminals on the other side. The wheels are airbrushed firs
    1 point
  27. It was gloomy yesterday so I turned the layout lights on and tried running a few trains in the dark. Daft, but oddly fun. Anyway, a few random pics of variable quality. The station in general, I need to lightproof the roof more next time it is off. This is a lucky pic. I cant really see the from of the station building so its just done by point the camera at the mirror on the end of the layout and hoping. The resultant image is then reversed in preview. Through a window. At
    1 point
  28. In response to a recent request, there follows a summary of materials used in this project with the blog entry numbers where they appeared. Railmatch Frame Dirt - Step 3. AMMO by Mig Panel Line Wash Black Night - Step 12. Railmatch Weathered Black - Steps 13 and 15. AK Interactive Fresh Engine Oil - Steps 14 and 21. MIG Productions Dark Mud - Step 18. MIG Productions Track Brown - Step 18. MIG Productions Black Smoke - Steps 18 and 22. There is another photograph of the (almost) finished locomotive
    1 point
  29. It may seem that I've jumped forward a bit here! Fear not, but I didn't want to dwell on my method of attacking the roofs as I don't feel I'm quite there yet in terms of a consistent approach. It's really just a question of trimming down a piece of vac-formed plastic until it fits, and the instructions do give some guidance, but I'd be lying if I said I don't find it a bit of a tricky step. It's all too easy to end up with asymmetric bits or too much taken off one side. All i can advocate is taking ones time and using sandpaper and files for the final fitting, followed by a degree of fettling
    1 point
  30. Well, the arrival of some parts from Sommerfeldt meant that today I was finally able to crack on with this project. A lick of paint and some glazing: The modified roof, showing the flat plasticard section and the original section filed to shape: Detailing parts from Hurst: The Sommerfeldt panto in place: Additional insulators at the non-panto end: Overall view of the new roof awaiting a second coat of paint:
    1 point
  31. Having tackled the sides, now comes the time to assemble them into a body. First we need a couple of ends. These are an excellent design and very easy to make, being just a single etch which then folds up into a self-locating component for both the chassis and the sides. Here's one such end (they're handed, so need to be at the right end of the coach!) with two nuts soldered in place as was also done with the bogie mounts. One very nice bit of design is two small tabs which fold down either side of the base plate, which in turn locate into slots in the turn-under at the base o
    1 point
  32. With the bogies and chassis more or less done, work turns to the body sides. There's nothing particularly tricky here, it's just all a bit time-consuming and I split the work below across two evenings. Here are the two etches for the sides, with the lower etch showing the droplight windows soldered into position. I don't have any magic solutions for this job, which is a bit tedious! The droplights must be positioned looking at the coach from the outside, or else they can end up a bit off-centered or askew. Once positioned, they need to be soldered in from the other
    1 point
  33. As mentioned in the previous entry, I promised to document the building of my next Roxey coach kit in a series of photos, so here goes. The first thing is to have a look at the contents of the kit, in this case an LSWR corridor third. Most of what's in the box is here, except for a few castings and bits related to the corridor connectors, which I won't be using. The etches are excellent and well laid out, with no issues encountered in separating any of the bits from the fret. Note the two bogie etches. I like to start with the bogies as the
    1 point
  34. Over the weekend and Monday evening I pressed on with a bit more work on the Roxey Mouldings coaches I've been making. As covered earlier, the first of these is a brake third which I mostly finished last year, and the one on the right is a composite which I've made in the last week or so. Weirdly, the composite went together without any head-scratching, whereas I had to resort to a bit of guesswork with the brake. I was puzzled as to why this should be the case do decided to have a closer look at the contents. It turned out that the brake had been packed with the wrong
    1 point
  35. The Fowler tank has been mostly completed, just needing a few details to be added/reinstated and then further testing before the addition of DCC control. The bodywork needed some attention. I reworked the entire rear bunker/cab-cutout to get a better/neater finish than had been on the original model. This entailed respraying and relining the bunker, and since I was about it, i also attended to some areas of bad or missing lining on the tank sides. I'd used HMRS pressfix lining when I did this original conversion in the 90s, and for consistency (and since it was
    1 point
  36. When in danger or in doubt, get the model railway out. The fourth layout in the Farthing series is taking shape, a welcome relief from the lockdown blues. Above is a reminder of the trackplan. So complicated that it broke Templot. Only very advanced modellers can do that. A test piece to see what the new Peco Bullhead track is all about. I decided to give Peco a go as a change from handbuilt track. The chairs are wrong for GWR, will be interesting to see how much I notice it. One advantage of the
    1 point
  37. Another brief offering of blue diesel action, since the first seemed to go down well. Heljan Hymek D7036 on the parcels service, which has gained a bit of weathering since the last set of shots. Blue sits well on Hymeks, doesn't it, especially with the white window surrounds. What fine looking diesels these were. Meanwhile the 08 potters about in the yard with a pair of conflats. I've no idea if these containers persisted into the blue diesel era, never mind the TOPs era, so happy to be told if they're a bit too old. for the setting.
    1 point
  38. When the pre-production models of the Bachmann Blue Pullman appeared, I thought that the Tri-ang model held up pretty well in terms of the basic body shape and detailing. One area where the Bachmann model particularly impressed me, though, was the detailing around the power bogies, with the brake pull rods very finely modelled. My model uses Chris Leigh castings for the bogie frames, which are fine in themselves but omit any representation of the brake gear: Note how there not only isn't any brake gear, but nothing at all in the void between the bogie frame
    1 point
  39. Although the layout's supposedly set in GWR days, I'm not only content to run it in BR steam days, but also to push the clock forward to the blue diesel era - within a very loose timeframe that allows for hydraulics, pullmans, TOPS-coded diesels and Railfreight-era wagons to sit comfortably (or not) together. Even the odd sectorisation or green diesel may squeak in. Here a few snaps from tonight's running session, hopefully providing a change from the usual staples of Castles and Kings! A Bachmann Class 47 on a parcels train. As the
    1 point
  40. The main work has been done, and the airbrush can be set aside for a few steps. Weathering powders, or pigments as I tend to call them, come in a great variety of textures and colours. The ones that work best for me are from military modelling ranges and are exceedingly finely ground. This enables the particles to fall into the lower reaches of the matt surface's layer(s) and stay there beyond the reach of fingers and other abrasive effects. In this case I'm using MIG Productions colours Dark Mud (for new rust), Track Brown (for old rust) and Black Smoke (for accumulated oil and gr
    1 point
  41. The last week has seen some relaxing, low-stress scenic modelling around the area of the level crossing. After fiddling around with loco chassis and so on, it's nice to cut loose and just hack away some polystyrene with a kichen knife. Perhaps the most obvious development here is the sudden arrival of a pub, where previously there was just a steeply sloping hillside. This has caused no end of comment in the King's Hintock parish newspaper, but since the establlshment apparently serves a wide range of ales, the pub's arrival has been quietly accepted by the majority o
    1 point
  42. As mentioned, I've built a new signal box to replace the old platform-mounted one for which there was unfortunately no place on the layout following the addition of a bay. Final exterior detailing is still to be done, but the painting is more or less complete and I think it looks quite smart. I followed the guidelines for signal box painting from the table in Vol 2 of Stephen Williams' GWR branch line books, using dark stone for the woodwork around the windows, and leaving the frames white. The area around the signal box, which was a mess of different levels, gaps in t
    1 point
  43. Layout taking shape nicely thanks in no small part to Scalescenes and their range of downloadable kits. Invaluable for someone living far from the model shops in the uk. Next step is a to start looking at the ballasting along with a fair bit of electrical stuff to sort out.
    1 point
  44. Last night saw further work on the Centenaries, which are now rapidly approaching priming. The first task was to fill the joint between the doors and sides with a couple of applications of Squadron White Putty. Attention then moved to the ends of the Restaurant pair. Unfortunately when working with the sides I based the conversion on minimising plastic removal, and didn’t read the instructions. Net result I have put both on the wrong way round! So the next task was to carefully carve off all of the end detail (fortunately the corridor connections are removable). It now all needs
    1 point
  45. Tonight I have cracked on with the last coach for my down Cornish Riveria formation, a composite again built with comet sides on a Hornby body. This is both for consistency with the rest of the take and as an easy way to add the window detail Construction followed all the other build with one extra step. Comet have cocked up the forming of the etch, so it doesn’t have the same profile as the restaurant pair (it is flatter) so I had to reform the tumble Home. Of course I only realise this after gluing the first side in place and then wondering why a gap was appearing at the bottom o
    1 point
  46. Rather than getting frustrated with handrails on my County once again, last night I made a start on the next Centenary build (a Restaurant Third). The process is getting a little repetitive now (dismantle coach, cut the rain strip off the etch, cut a large hole in the side, evostick together. The plus side is that I am getting quite fast at the process, with the removal of the Airfix glazing taking longer than fitting the first side. Tonight I aim to complete the second side of this coach along with converting the first side of a composite. Here it is along with the restaurant first (
    1 point
  47. While I wait for the Romford screwdriver and crank pins needed to finish my County, I have gone back to working on my Cornish Riveria Express project. Having already built two thirds and a left hand brake, etched have now arrived for the restaurant pair along with the composite. The latter is being converted as I feel it will be a lot quicker to replace the whole side than to just add the new window frames. Work has started on the more complicated build for the restaurant First, mostly because the other two donor coaches were outside! I started by preparing the direst body side,
    1 point
  48. Onto part two, the second side followed the same approach as the first, with an awful lot of plastic removed from the side to clear the windows. I have also added a fillet of superglue to reinforce the area above the inset doors to provide additional strength. I have also made a start on the roof, although a lot more conversion work is required. I have one question that I am yet to confirm, at the kitchen end on the corridor side is there a window? I know ther is not a window on the non corridor side. Despite climbing over the prototype at one of the rmweb Didcot visits I didn’t
    1 point
  49. After an unpleasant experience with a point motor (don't ask, I don't want to talk about it * :icon_mutter:) I thought I'd try some of this boundary pushing lark. Following Graeme's revalation that current production N stock will run on 2mm Association Easitrac I felt that it had to be worth a play - so with a supply of concrete sleeper Easitrac sprues, some code 40 flat bottom rail, a supply of copperclad sleepers and a couple of 2mmFS track gauges it was time to play. Well, that went well. :icon_thumbsup2: Now for the copperclad. I couldn't be bothered to fin
    1 point
  50. Eight days ago I bought the Connoisseur Models LMS 4F kit from owner Jim McGeown at the Bristol O Gauge Show. I really could not wait to get stuck into it, so a week later I finished constructing the tender, though it still needs some final filing and sanding before going to the paint shop. The engine's chassis has also been started on, but that will be the subject of another post. A few comments: The castings for this kit are simply the best I have seen. The axle box castings needed no fettling, see previous post The etches fitted together well with no mismatches at all I still use
    1 point
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