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56 minutes ago, Barry Ten said:

 

Not too long, if you just put on a relatively light coat - certainly not hours and hours.

And not so long that the cream hardens up and pulls away when you remove the tape.

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15 minutes ago, St Enodoc said:

And not so long that the cream hardens up and pulls away when you remove the tape.

Are we still talking about masking tape and paint here? Otherwise this sounds painful! :O

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1 hour ago, St Enodoc said:

And not so long that the cream hardens up and pulls away when you remove the tape.

 

I use Tamiya low-tack masking tape but even then, I take off even more of the tack by peeling it on and off a (non-fluffy)

fabric surface.  That, plus a good primer, seems to have eliminated the problem of the cream lifting but I've certainly

had my share of it.

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15 hours ago, checkrail said:

 two to build it and two to rescue and restore it from my errors, mishaps and other challenges.

 

 

 

 

You're not alone in that...

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Lovely. Appreciate the effort that goes into coaches - so many things to go wrong - you think you are almost there and then something else crops up. But that looks wonderful. 

 

Assuming it was lightly loaded I always wonder how travellers back in those days picked what to ride in as the train pulled in - and walking through a train how to choose a carriage. The differences in interiors and contrasts as you passed through the gangways must have been interesting. And for the enthusiast: hard to choose sometimes. The Great Western never really managed to harmonise their carriage stock and there must have been many 'Do I go for the comfy old clerestory with the rather dodgy ride or the new but more utilitarian bow end stock?' 

 

I used to preference anything with opening windows [when that was a thing].

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Don't beat yourself up too much John as I would say it looks ok to blind man on a galloping horse and something different to everyone else has on theirs.;)

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If it looks as good as this at that magnification then it is going to be fine in real life. The microstrip hinge trick sounds great. I have an etch of door hinges and I keep looking at them and thinking is it worth it...

 

I'm working with Hornby Maunsells in lockdown. they have many of the same features: cream paint, lots of door handles and grab rails. Half way through the paint process I noticed the odd door hinge missing - was that missing on the factory moulding? - and then was reminded to check a door on another carriage which has hinges moulded on both sides of a door.. Yep - three hinges both sides...

 

 

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I like the idea of pushing the microstrip hinges in from inside. I made mine from little bits of microstrip but glued them on from the front:

 

70foot_9.jpg

 

However getting them all into some sort of acceptable alignment is a real pain and they're vulnerable to being dislodged until

the paint's on.

 

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3 hours ago, Barry Ten said:

I like the idea of pushing the microstrip hinges in from inside. I made mine from little bits of microstrip but glued them on from the front:

Lovely neat work there.  What's the actual diagram of that one?

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8 hours ago, checkrail said:

And my steel rule slides around all over it. 

A strip of masking tape on the back will help.

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21 hours ago, checkrail said:

Lovely neat work there.  What's the actual diagram of that one?

 

It's the C46 Collett 70 foot corridor third, from the Comet kit. I also built a 70 foot brake and have a restaurant car to do. They are nice coaches but looooooonnng.

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Posted (edited)

Lurking near the back of Tiverton Castle's train for some years has been another old Hornby clerestory.  It's had a bit of titivation so far, but nothing drastic.

P1060229.JPG.83d3b8a73e4c7b589acb7a5e44c40e00.JPG

This one will get the treatment in due course, though I may take a break from clerestories for the next coach project.  

 

John C.

Edited by checkrail
more info
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Now 5041 meets Aylburton Grange coming the other way with a west-bound parcels train.

C16-13.jpg.0759cdf9f0e333deb9f2071270637b21.jpg

 

C16-14.jpg.56010e3800ed3e7e0c1e7fb45e88499d.jpg

 

John C.

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Good to see such varied coaching stock including superb clerestory vehicles.

If you want to save some effort     remember from 1920s on clerestory glazing was often painted/plated over.

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