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Regency Rails - Georgian, Williamine & Early Victorian Railways

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8 hours ago, Charlie586 said:

That could be the reason. I suppose it could just be the loading gauges line up worse the other way as there wasn't a period of mixed gauge so they weren't restricted by platforms for both.  A quick search bought this up http://www.internationalsteam.co.uk/trains/holland02.htm, plus there seems to be other photos out there, but not of standard and broad together.

 

 

Might it not be to protect the clearances between adjacent running tracks, in a localised layout which is clearly an addition to the pre-existing SG track layout? Is it a true comparison to the GWR, which designed and operated a true dual-Gauge network? 

Edited by rockershovel
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On 23/10/2019 at 19:15, Annie said:

Yes, - it's a 'Patentee', - I got the name wrong when I posted above.  These are big images and a couple are a little well worn since they are scans of the original drawings.  'Amstel' was built for the Dutch Broad Gauge not the narrow  standard gauge.

Thanks Annie. These are much appreciated!

 

Dana

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On 06/10/2019 at 20:54, john new said:

Early Mainline Railways 2nd Conference - Proceedings book

 

EMLRC2 –the last chance to order and save is approaching! (The Conference was held in 2018) The book of the conference is now almost ready for print - this your last chance to subscribe at the substantially reduced rate of £36 (plus p&p). You will find the details at https://rchs.org.uk/early-railways-conference-combined/ on the RCHS website.

 

Obviously not a book about modelling early railways but covering a range of elements relating to the prototype during the period covered by this thread.

 

The next conference will be in Swansea during June 2021 with the call for expressions of interest in presenting papers due out this coming January.

 

 

The Early Railways, and Early Mainline Railways serials of conferences are now combined. Next is in Swansea in June 2021, as stated, then near Darlington (Date/venue TBC) in 2025 for the obvious reasons surrounding the S&D bi-centenary.

 

 

The deadline for ordering has been extended. As author's we now have our submission proofs for checking so the order option will be closing soon but if you haven't yet ordered a copy you still can.

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Possibly of interest to some members of this forum. Even if not directly relevant to you please share this Call for Papers with any contacts you have who may be interested.

The_7th_International_EARLY_RAILWAYS_CONFERENCE.jpg

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On 19/10/2019 at 23:16, Malcolm 0-6-0 said:

It is not so long ago as people think.

 

Commercial sail lingered on in England in the form of sea going barges in the 1950's and on into the 1960's

 

 

On 19/10/2019 at 23:16, Malcolm 0-6-0 said:

Yes it is one of those things that seem to be going full circle. Things like the  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbosail ot the other alternative the Rotor Ship https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotor_ship .

 

Interesting ideas and quite efficient in some circumstances. Although the emission reduction aspect is somewhat nullified by the need for some form of conventional motor to drive them. Presumably solar cells and batteries for work at night but I suspect a bit of an engineering nightmare to find room for all that and cargo.

 

Nearly 50 years ago when I was in my middle twenties I worked for a period in a shipping agency where I had to, amongst other things, turn out at all hours to meet incoming ships. I remember one arrival where the ship was guided into the dock by tugs then swung to line it up with the wharf, but done with a little more gusto than was necessary. The ship moved sideways rather rapidly straight at the wharf and smacked into it with considerable force and everything on the wharf including us and cars all got lifted into the air. Fortunately the wharf's pilings were springy but the effect was something to behold. So I hope these remote control crew less ships have better means of control. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_blink.png 

 

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I've been doing some research to build myself a layout set around the 1840s-50s and one of the things I've noticed on a lot of the early locomotives do not seem to have wheel weights on the driving wheels, does anyone know when they first start being adopted? And does anyone know a source of suitable wheels in 00 Gauge? Also are there any manufacturers of the Hackworth plug type wheels? Many Thanks

 

 

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