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That now makes sense and looks like a plan Chris.:good:

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I'll second that. It makes me think of Ventnor station yard on the Isle of Wight. I'm sure there are other examples.

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Haverthwaite has a tunnel at both sides of the station.

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My personal opinion is that the tunnel opening is visually too tall (almost twice the height of the coach) 

 

So I’m going to cut an inch off the bottom, I’m also going to look at making the first curve a 4th radius curve instead of 2nd and see how it would look with the tunnel entrance on that curve....it might look poo but it’s worth a try before I permanently glue down the track

 

Edited by chuffinghell
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I would have to agree with you there. A good number of tunnels on minor lines were notoriously tight. The example I showed you at Glenfield (built 1832) was so small that British Railways had to keep a pair of ancient Midland Railway Johnson 2F tender locos running to operate the line, something that has been cited as contributing to its closure. Apparently the inaugural train through the tunnel, hauled by a Stephenson locomotive, knocked its chimney off when it struck the roof. 

Saw away with confidence say I.

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Ideally you want a gradual transition from straight to 2nd radius.

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6 minutes ago, Nile said:

Ideally you want a gradual transition from straight to 2nd radius.


Agreed although I’ve designed the layout so no curves are visible as I don’t have the space for realistic sweeping curves

 

If having the tunnel on the curve does look poo (as I suspect it will) Having a 4th radius curve may still allow me to move the tunnel further back to give a slightly longer straight section.

 

I’ve positioned the tunnel entrance to give enough ‘straight’ for a loco to miss the point without entering the tunnel so if it doesn’t work it’s not a problem 

 

 

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15 minutes ago, MrWolf said:

I would have to agree with you there. A good number of tunnels on minor lines were notoriously tight. The example I showed you at Glenfield (built 1832) was so small that British Railways had to keep a pair of ancient Midland Railway Johnson 2F tender locos running to operate the line, something that has been cited as contributing to its closure. Apparently the inaugural train through the tunnel, hauled by a Stephenson locomotive, knocked its chimney off when it struck the roof. 

Saw away with confidence say I.


The photo of the tunnel mouth on Gaugemaster adds actually shows it shorter (if you look at it in relation to the retaining walls)
 

730B7914-3842-452A-93FB-CB650731FAE5.jpeg.1d33b71516b5ecfde0bb77c5cf8e979d.jpeg

 

76DCFDEA-D36C-461D-8EBE-A00E6CB34B0C.jpeg.cb2ff9d83c7d828f46a788203cccc2e8.jpeg

 

 

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Interesting, perhaps the designers or toolmakers realised that the moulding would appeal to more buyers if it was tall enough to accept overhead line equipment and that enterprising individuals would no doubt take a saw to it for a claustrophobic steam era tunnel?

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59 minutes ago, MrWolf said:

Interesting, perhaps the designers or toolmakers realised that the moulding would appeal to more buyers if it was tall enough to accept overhead line equipment and that enterprising individuals would no doubt take a saw to it for a claustrophobic steam era tunnel?


It’s just a thought at the moment as I don’t really want to lose too much of the ‘horse shoe‘ shape

 

Maybe just 1/2” off the bottom would look better?

 

 

Edited by chuffinghell
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Not losing the horseshoe will involve a bit of clever surgery. I don't know if it would work without having the moulding in front of me, but I would try this by using the tunnel mouth as a template to make a card test piece to experiment on and work to the sketch below.

IMG_20200917_210131.jpg

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1 minute ago, MrWolf said:

Not losing the horseshoe will involve a bit of clever surgery. I don't know if it would work without having the moulding in front of me, but I would try this by using the tunnel mouth as a template to make a card test piece to experiment on and work to the sketch below.

IMG_20200917_210131.jpg


Agreed, although to be quite honest I didn’t really want to perform major surgery, It might look different with a tunnel liner.

 

As always I’ll give it some thought

 

Great sketch, very explanatory 

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You may well be better off lopping half an inch off the bottom as you suggested, but the more I thought about it, I had to get it on paper because of the changing radius of an elliptical tunnel, I can't think of another way of doing it. The tunnel mouth would also end up proportionally narrowed in line with the reduction in height. 

A good combination of OCD, literally waiting for a painting to dry, zilch on TV and 'er indoors being curled up like a cat (It's not wise or safe to wake a sleeping female is it?) means that I have shared the idea in case it does work for someone.

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