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You could do what LGB does with their 4-wheelers and have them as single axle articulated bogies?

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With the Bachmann Wickham railcar + trailer as well, lots of possibilities. Trams run on much sharper curves than normal SG rail. There was a 48DS on the Liverpool Overhead Railway works train [Herculaneum Dock].

 

You could use single freight bogies as under frames for special-purpose wagons. Heavy duty versions were used to carry steel ladles in foundries where some 48DS worked. 

 

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has been done for years by narrow gaugers using Bachmann motor bogies(original GE 44). I have a motorised wheelie bin running on sharp (10cm radius) curves. Pulling anyhing is the tricky part. Certainly would replace couplings,

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15 minutes ago, rue_d_etropal said:

has been done for years by narrow gaugers using Bachmann motor bogies(original GE 44). I have a motorised wheelie bin running on sharp (10cm radius) curves. Pulling anyhing is the tricky part. Certainly would replace couplings,

Have you got a picture of the motorised wheelie bin. :mocking_mini:

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8 minutes ago, luke the train spotter said:

Have you got a picture of the motorised wheelie bin. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_mocking_mini.gif

sm-marche-1.jpg

I think it isthe Bachmann bogie, asI have alo used the Brill tram bogie to power similar trains(?). Scale is approx 1/24 , so comes under Gn15 banner

Edited by rue_d_etropal
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On 27/10/2019 at 22:00, luke the train spotter said:

I couldn't believe it when I managed to get not only my Ruston but my w4 peckett as well going around 2 1/2 inch radius curves and the Ruston managed it comfortably! This really is top notch stuff and the ideal candidate for micro layouts. The track I tested it on had a diameter a little over 6 inches meaning that you can have a roundy in 6 inches not 6ft. The downside is no standard length wagons could manage this extreme radius but a little bit of boshing and you could have something reasonable and very light railway-ish. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/IMG_20191027_215241260.jpg.0f68aa517a7dde964e4ad88660570b02.jpgThis is beginning to look like a potential project for me once Finlarig halt is finished.

 

I know that I'll regret asking this - but why ????????????????

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

 

....... and, please, something more imaginative than "'Cos we can"!

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There is a photo of some 60cm (?) gauge Decauville track in side room at a narrow gauge exhibition(Wells?) a few years ago, Track was done to tight radius if required, but unlikely to be loco operated. For standard gauge some of the American urban freight lines (connected by boat) were pretty sharp radius but not this tight, and they had advantage of no buffers to get locked .

Otherwise, why not!

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I built a portable garden railway in a flower pot. The loco was powered by a spud (motor bogie not a potato).  Eventually the spud disintegrated as a result of going round the small radius circle at exhibitions, probably because the outer rail is much longer than the inner one. 

 

It was good fun though.  At one exhibition a visitor said there should be a working water feature - so we added a water crane with real water coming out. :rolleyes:

Edited by ColinK
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11 hours ago, ColinK said:

It was good fun though. 

It is my casual observation that some among us are so steeped in authenticity-above-all that fun is no longer part of their motivation. 

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2 hours ago, Oldddudders said:

It is my casual observation that some among us are so steeped in authenticity-above-all that fun is no longer part of their motivation. 

 

You called?

 

Not so - I would say that at least 50% of my locos and rolling stock would have no legitimate place on my projected Evercreech Junction 1961; the 'illegitimate' items were built / bought because I like them.

 

Fun, though? I'm not sure that I equate my railway modelling with fun - though it certainly gives me great pleasure and satisfaction.

 

I'm sure that it a defect on my part, but I just can't see the point of the circle of track round the Christmas tree / biscuit tin / plant pot / etc. etc.; they certainly don't amuse me, and that has nothing to do with authenticity, or lack of it.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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It is obvious that different peple have different ideas on what is fun.

I can enjoy doing a task, but I prefer to also have fun and still complete the task.

For me it is not enough just be be running trains even if they are not prototypically correct. I create a whole new world, and my creations get noticed at exhibitions. I like to put a smile on visitors' faces, and happy visitos are more likely to come back again, and want to create something themselves.

Although I don't do much Gn15 these days, I was an active member of the Gnatterbox, where everyone was friendly and helpful, whatever scale/gauge you modelled.Although some tried to be serious it was more about fun, than counting rivets.

I do model what some might describe as normal trains, but often add a twist and don't restrict myself to normal model railway scales.

Some of the best challenges involve 'fun' models.

 

The mini layout  I built with the motorised wheelie bin was something I set as a challenge to commemorate 100 years of 15in gauge, Ratty style, I seem to remember. I just happened to have a box 19in by 15in, and designed layout to fit in, and used my 3D printed track system including a working wagon turntable.

 

I probably enjoy the building of layouts more than operating them, but do like to share them by taking them to exibitions.

Edited by rue_d_etropal
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At the end of the day if you don't like the look of it then the layout obviously isn't targeting you. This roundy is more of a proof of concept and the thread was set up so that any other industrial modellers can find out the minimum radius of the Ruston and peckett - even if it is ridiculously small. 

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3 hours ago, luke the train spotter said:

At the end of the day if you don't like the look of it then the layout obviously isn't targeting you. This roundy is more of a proof of concept and the thread was set up so that any other industrial modellers can find out the minimum radius of the Ruston and peckett - even if it is ridiculously small. 

You have demonstrated to the rest of us just what this tiny loco can do - its potential. Thus you have added to the sum of modelling knowledge. How and whether the rest of us capitalise on what you have shown is up to us. But thanks!

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Certainly opens up possibilities for an industrial or dockside corner. Or a flight-of-fancy micro!

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Why do people think that rivet counting is the opposite of fun?

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1 hour ago, Talltim said:

Why do people think that rivet counting is the opposite of fun?


I’ve no idea.  As an exhibitor at more shows than I care to remember, I find there is at least one of those with spurious comments.  My usual, polite, response is .... “could I have a look at your layout then? “.  Often one gets the response that one hasn’t been built yet, but they are too ready to criticise.  The hobby is about fun.  As for the Ruston, where this thread actually started, I’m very grateful for the heads up on the loco’s performance ..... just ordered mine on basis of it.

 

  Rivet counters, don’t  try and impose your inane thoughts on us who are in this for FUN !!!
 

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6 minutes ago, noctilux2 said:


..... your inane thoughts ......
 

 

I don't recall reading anything in this thread that would warrant that derogatory comment; please could you point out those 'inane thoughts'?

 

I have read a question, (which I posed), which has received considered responses - other than your own.

 

Some model for fun; some for other, equally valid resons - none deserve your abuse!

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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I think what may be really interesting to do with something like this is to create a 'normal' sized layout with really sharp curves, allowing you to cram a heck of a lot in. The temptation is usually to do a micro, but you proportionally have the same space as something like a classic BLT.

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13 minutes ago, Corbs said:

I think what may be really interesting to do with something like this is to create a 'normal' sized layout with really sharp curves, allowing you to cram a heck of a lot in. The temptation is usually to do a micro, but you proportionally have the same space as something like a classic BLT.

 

It certainly opens up possibilities. I can think of several industrial layouts you could create this way that wouldn't look unrealistic. Perhaps for operational interest, one could include a transfer siding, where a larger loco incapable of traversing the curves leaves its wagons.

 

I also rather like the above-mentioned idea of a tram layout. Perhaps the classic BLT reduced to the end of an urban tramway or elevated railway with a small depot. I've always thought the layout of track around Poplar DLR depot would make an interesting layout, albeit that's perhaps a little modern for the Ruston.

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Ruston just arrived & images taken on my suitable industrial micro, "Kidmore Boxed 2" (see other thread).  Seems a perfect partner for this layout theme.

IMG_1690.JPG

IMG_1691.JPG

IMG_1693.JPG

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