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Exotic place names in the UK

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Like How Hill in Norfolk.. or TorpenHow Hill  in Cumbria meaning, hill, hill, hill, hill.

 

 or the many River Avon /Afon meaning River River..

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Pendle Hill - means hill hill hill too...

 

And thinking of darker days of yore, there's Gallows Close in Scarborough...

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1 minute ago, MarkC said:

Pendle Hill - means hill hill hill too...

 

And thinking of darker days of yore, there's Gallows Close in Scarborough...

Which reminds me that Dancers Hill (as found in quite a few places) refers to the gallows.

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15 hours ago, billbedford said:

On the road between Warminster and Salisbury the is a sign pointing to 'The Langfords' and I've often wondered if included Bonnie. 

Of the Hanging, Steeple and Little variety, closely nestled with Great Wishford.

 

John

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32 minutes ago, billbedford said:

What about Totting Bec? a name that seems misplaced from Cumberland. 

'Bec' without a 'K' is a common place name in Haute Normandie, whence came William the Conqueror.

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Posted (edited)

It's amusing to read about two areas of England that are close to my heart, central Essex (near to the river Roding) where I spent my childhood, and central Dorset (  the Winterborne Valley) where I now live. But I will throw in another two names, one from near each area, central Essex - Shellow Bowells, and central Dorset - Tincleton.

 

edit, Oh apologies to 'Gwiwer', there is no 'u' in the spelling of the central Dorset Winterborne. :sungum: - from this resident of Winterborne Kingston ( and former resident of Fyfield in Essex).

Edited by bike2steam
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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, The Johnster said:

Ayot has to be related to eyot, a Nordic derived name for a small island, whether in the sea or a river.  Swansea, nothing to do with swans or eyes, is derived from Sweyn's Eyot, presumably Mumbles Head, Sweyn being a well known local Viking character who is apparently buried in Sweyn's Howe on top of Rhosilli Down, Gower.  His name in modern Norwegian would be Sven.  He turns up at Swanbridge, nothing to do with swans or bridges, near Sully (between Penarth and Barry); this is Sweyn's Brigga, a brigga being a causeway or isthmus; it is the tidal causeway connecting Sully Island to the mainlaind.  Sweyn was something of a pirate and used the place as a base.  

 

He also established a garrison of his men on Steep Holm island, from where they could easily raid both sides of the Bristol Channel, an enterprise that did not end well as a spell of bad weather meant that he could neither provision them or get them off.  They died of malnutrition and exposure, and their bones were discovered some time later by Saint Baruc, who gives his name to Barry.  Baruc spent some time on the island as a retreat, and took it upon himself to give these dead Vikings a christian burial, something they would not have been happy about at all!

 

Aha - memories of Chiswick Eyot and almost being stranded on it in 1975 with my mum, dad, sister and uncle, the day before the Boat Race, we were having a shuftie to pick a nice spot to see the race the following day. We ended up watching the race from the safety of Hammersmith Bridge instead! On the Barnes side of the bridge the first turning on the right is named Castlenau, presumably meaning 'new castle'...? Our grandparents lived in Nassau Road a little further along the Thames, I always found it strange that a street in sleepy south west London should be named after some exotic islands thousands of miles away.

Edited by Rugd1022
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17 hours ago, The Johnster said:

Ayot has to be related to eyot, a Nordic derived name for a small island, whether in the sea or a river.

 

Unlikely in the case of the Hertfordshire Ayots... they are all at the tops of hills, no rivers, seas or lakes in sight! Might be the odd pond...

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3 hours ago, Gwiwer said:

 

At least two different locations in Cornwall go by the name of Castle-an-Dinas.  The Castle Castle.  

Almost; Dinas is Cornish, and Welsh, for a city, or more precisely a walled city in the old days, related to the Arabic Medina/Mdina.   

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3 hours ago, TheQ said:

Like How Hill in Norfolk.. or TorpenHow Hill  in Cumbria meaning, hill, hill, hill, hill.

 

 or the many River Avon /Afon meaning River River..

The result of the newly arrived  and muscular but not that bright Saxons asking the native Britons what the wet flowy thing was, meaning what was that particular wet flowy thing named.   The Britons sniggered to themselves and explained that we usually referred to them as rivers (you blonde blue eyed eejits).

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7 minutes ago, The Johnster said:

Almost; Dinas is Cornish, and Welsh, for a city, or more precisely a walled city in the old days, related to the Arabic Medina/Mdina.   

Also Russian for a firebrick, apparently., after they imported quantities of them from a silica mine near Pont Nedd Fechan.

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9 minutes ago, The Johnster said:

The result of the newly arrived  and muscular but not that bright Saxons asking the native Britons what the wet flowy thing was, meaning what was that particular wet flowy thing named.   The Britons sniggered to themselves and explained that we usually referred to them as rivers (you blonde blue eyed eejits).

Slightly off topic, isn't that how the kangaroo got its name?

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The story, sadly not true, is that one of Captain Cook’s men, astounded at the size of the mice and no doubt apprehensive about the cats, asked an aboriginal gentleman what the hoppy furry thing was, and the aboriginal gent, who was hard of hearing, answered ‘kangaroo’, which in his language meant ‘eh, pardon’. 
 

That this is not true is to my mind one of the greatest ever disasters in the field of human culture and mutual understanding...

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On 09/03/2020 at 14:21, Fat Controller said:

whilst Co. Durham has Philidelphia and Washington.

And a Nova Scotia, near Fatfield

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On 09/03/2020 at 19:47, Rugd1022 said:

Talking of Bedfordshire, I often have to drive the Freighliner staff vans to and from our longer jobs and pass through a little village on the A6 called Milton Ernest, it sounds like the name of a novel written by someone like Oscar Wilde.

Not to mention his brother Milton Bryan, also in Bedfordshire which also has Ireland, near Old Warden and a Witts End, near Eversholt.  

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People eating the wrong thing crops up here and there. How otherwise to explain Ellen's Green, near Horsham, and Gill's Green near Hawkhurst, and site of the former station? 

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31 minutes ago, Lambton58 said:

also in Bedfordshire which also has Ireland,

 

Oh dear, we really are starting to repeat ourselves...:mocking_mini:

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An area in the town of Cambuslang, Scotland is called Halfway and Central SMT buses used to have "Halfway" in their destination board, I always wondered "Halfway to where"

 

Have we mentioned Cockermouth yet?  Always had that Oh Err Missus feeling about it

 

Jim

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1 hour ago, Nickey Line said:

 

Oh dear, we really are starting to repeat ourselves...:mocking_mini:

Ah! Missed that! Pity Me (which is in Durham :-) )

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23 minutes ago, luckymucklebackit said:

An area in the town of Cambuslang, Scotland is called Halfway and Central SMT buses used to have "Halfway" in their destination board, I always wondered "Halfway to where"

 

The area in Glasgow where Paisley Road West and Mosspark Boulevard come together is also known as Halfway. In that case, it seems likely that it's halfway between the centre of Glasgow and Paisley.

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13 minutes ago, Lambton58 said:

Pity Me (which is in Durham :-) )

And at risk of repeating once again Pityme is in Cornwall.

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Wideopen is in Northumberland. And yes, it does have a Women's Institute. Form an orderly queue, chaps. 

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1 minute ago, Gwiwer said:

And at risk of repeating once again Pityme is in Cornwall.

As well...  I wonder if there were any other settlements called Pity Me / Pityme in the old mining areas? 

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