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relaxinghobby

2-4-0 Isle of Wight Beyer Peacock tank loco from the 1870s

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A scratch build project to build one of the little Isle of Wight steam engines that could be considered a standard design on the island during the time of the Victorian era steam railways. They were standard products of the manufacturers Beyer Peacock and were also exported to other countries around the world.

 

post-6220-0-85005400-1332056835.jpg

 

A drawing worked up on a CAD computer programme

 

post-6220-0-29637100-1332056865.jpg

 

Using the 3D capabilities of the program

 

post-6220-0-24299400-1332056919.jpeg

 

Paper fold up models made from the plans, the bigger tank became plastic reality, it was meant to be an 0-6-4 of the Irish SL&NCR

 

post-6220-0-08306600-1332056961.jpg

 

Paper models in pieces showing construction.

 

post-6220-0-82513700-1332056889.jpg

 

This is as far as it got trying to print the planned pieces onto plastic sheet worked but the ink easily smudged making it impossible to cut out accurately and the project stalled.

Edited by relaxinghobby
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How about using spray glue mounting a paper plan on to the plasticard, then taking it off afterwards

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Pedant mode on-I am delighted to see that, clever as it is, this CAD package has the same inability to distinguish between first and third angle orthographic projection than most of my students over the years!-pedant mode off.

 

Clever stuff though and I look forward to seeing progress. Could you tell us more about how you produced the initial plans-what CAD package did you use etc?

 

Ed

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So what are the first and third angle of orthographic projection? In the diagram above you see what is rendered by the Turbo Cad 10 program which was running on Windows 98 and ME (2000) on my slow and unpowerful PC. It's still too slow to run Google Sketch-Up or the more modern 3D drawing programmes such as Blender. The trouble is I can not run Turbo Cad 10 any more as it always wants another code number when I try to re-install it so I can not access all my work I've done with it, I have a few printed plans to work from for the Beyer-Peacock tank.

 

In the end to cut out the planned shapes I printed the shapes page onto paper and glued it to a sheet of plastic card. Everything was designed to be made from 20 thou' plasticard.

 

The shapes I've designed are just guessed at, I won't know how well they fit together until I've assembled them.

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How about using spray glue mounting a paper plan on to the plasticard, then taking it off afterwards

You can also buy A4 sheets of self adhesive white paper from Crafty Computer paper. I've used them in the past for printing out drawings and sticking them to plasticard.

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Guest Natalie Graham

Or the larger sizes of self-adhesive labels, Choose the 'peelable' ones so the glue comes off again.

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assuming that the design is CAD dxf and modified a little you could use a Craft Robo to cut 10 thou plastic straight out :paint:

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post-6220-0-27580200-1332766257_thumb.jpg

 

This pictures shows a temporary cardboard chassis so I can workout which motor and gearbox combination will fit.

You can also see some old style wheels I got cheap from from an exhibition sale, they need some work to be prepared will they turn out to be a bargain?

The triangular bit of metal at the front is the basis of a Branchlines two stage gearbox, this one with the cogs for an 80:1 gear ratio. I think it's going to

push the motor up to high to fit in the boiler.

 

 

post-6220-0-95336400-1332766279_thumb.jpg

 

The same again with the tank.

The underside of the plasticard tank showing the ribs or profile pieces I have used to keep the tank sides at the correct distance apart.

I t has to fit over the wheels, a motor space will be cut out later after the sides are built up with another layer with details and the tank unit is much stronger.

 

 

post-6220-0-10498400-1332766295_thumb.jpg

 

A temporary footplate of plastic to check dimension before I take on the task of making a much more difficult to cutout metal one. The lines on it are the printed paper pattern. The two slots are to make it clear the wheels.

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This is a lovely bit of work, I mut learn how to use a cad program I have a whole list of things to do.

I look forward to seeing this progress it is a lovely little engine.

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A similar loco is still at work in Japan. Only seen it on a video but it sounds like watchmakers engineering. Additionally the Japanese have restored the bodywork to immaculate condition. The model looks good.

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A similar loco is still at work in Japan. Only seen it on a video but it sounds like watchmakers engineering. Additionally the Japanese have restored the bodywork to immaculate condition. The model looks good.

 

Oberg's Locomotives of Australia reports the NSWGR as having 18 Beyer Peacock 2-4-0Ts built in 1885-7 based on the IoW design . A number were retained as depot/works shunters and two survive - one of which worked into the early 70s in the final days of NSW steam

 

If this project works , my faint idea of modelling the shortlived N Sydney car float may be a starter.....

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post-6220-0-02352900-1336245585.jpg

 

I'm sitting here looking at my metal stock and pondering what thickness of sheet nickle silver to use.

I'm about to cut out the parts for the cab and footplate but am unsure about the necessary thickness needed for the parts to give them enough strength.

The footplate has no valance to strengthen it and the cab is all edges so there will be little reinforcing strength to be got from corners.

 

So which do I use, the 0.006 thou' or the much stiffer 10 thous'?

I'm drawn towards the 10 thou' as it seems easier to cut with the jeweler's saw from my little experience.

 

 

PICTURE OF CAB TO SHOW ALL EDGES

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https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_05_2012/post-6220-0-02352900-1336245585.jpg

 

I'm sitting here looking at my metal stock and pondering what thickness of sheet nickle silver to use.

I'm about to cut out the parts for the cab and footplate but am unsure about the necessary thickness needed for the parts to give them enough strength.

The footplate has no valance to strengthen it and the cab is all edges so there will be little reinforcing strength to be got from corners.

 

So which do I use, the 0.006 thou' or the much stiffer 10 thous'?

I'm drawn towards the 10 thou' as it seems easier to cut with the jeweler's saw from my little experience.

 

 

PICTURE OF CAB TO SHOW ALL EDGES

 

I would use the 10 thou I presume you are making it in 4mm? I used 10 for my scratch building in that scale. The other I feel is a bit flimsy.

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Useful drawing. Did you ever complete this loco?p

 

Dava

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