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Tony Wright

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19 minutes ago, Mallard60022 said:

Regarding the names for B1s, I was and am hopeless at trying to get my vocals around some Pacific examples. Sad I know but how is 60117 pronounced? Also 60514 and 60530. I can manage 60536 but that is only because of life experience.

P. Hil

Good morning Phil,

 

As a sprog 'spotter, 60117 was always Bowis Russell! Since it's French, it's Bwa Rousey (I think). Perhaps a linguist will help. 60514 (again, I think) is Shamosair (it's also an Alpine mountain), and 60530 is Sayaji Row (as in quarrel). 

60128 was always phonic to us sprogs, but, also being French, it should be pronounced Bongrarse. 

 

Oh those lovely loco names. Which has set me thinking..............

 

My personal opinion as to loco names, could be listed thus.........

 

Best of all; the P2s.

The most absurd; the Gresley A3s (though not every one).

Really good; The 'Britannias'.

Also very good; the 'Kings' and the 'King Arthurs'.

Most jingoistic; the 'Lord Nelsons'. 

Most educational; the 'Jubilees'.

The most boring; 'Halls', 'Granges', 'Manors', etc.

The daftest; 'The Red Nose' on a Virgin HST some years ago, though other modern names are running it close. 

The most literate; the various classes named from the Scott novels. 

Those with the most correct English; the post-War 'Counties' - not perpetuated by British Rail with things like 'County of Cambridgeshire', for instance.

The most patriotic; obviously the 'Patriots' (at least some) and the 'Royal Scots'. 

 

There must be dozens of others...........................

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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37 minutes ago, Mallard60022 said:

Regarding the names for B1s, I was and am hopeless at trying to get my vocals around some Pacific examples. Sad I know but how is 60117 pronounced? Also 60514 and 60530. I can manage 60536 but that is only because of life experience.

P. Hil

I would struggle with plenty too, including 60117.

 

8652305897_849bbdd0b8_z.jpg60117_Wymondley_up-YP_3-61 by Robert Carroll, on Flickr

 

I've never been totally sure of the correct pronunciation of D9009 Alycidon.

 

As for 60530, I haven't a clue how to say the name.

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I think for most educational you'd struggle to beat some of the LNWR names, particularly those on Precursors. 

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Regarding pronunciation of D9009, a friend in the DPS always says it as A-li-Siddon, if that makes sense

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05420-tony-0-6-0st-hl-3460-1921-hawkins-

 

Britannia's for me as No 1. - Apollo and Shooting Star.

 

Brit15

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

There must be dozens of others...........................

 

I thought British Rail had a good try with the Class 60s - a mix several themes including well-known (but not celebrity) names and mountains, some of which were un-pronounceable except to Highlanders.

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4 hours ago, Nick Holliday said:

It seems that Umseke is the Kaffir name for the Reitbok or Reedbuck. Apologies if the K word is no longer PC, but the definition comes from an old tome.

 

Kaffir, a creole based on Zulu with a smattering of Afrikaans and English. So presumably umseke is in fact the Zulu name. It might be both more PC and chronologically correct to say that reitbok is the Afrikaans name for umseke, and reedbuck the English name. In any case, it shows a fine sense of evenhandedness on the part of the LNER naming committee (even if unintentional) to memorialise the species under all three names!

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Good morning Phil,

 

As a sprog 'spotter, 60117 was always Bowis Russell! Since it's French, it's Bwa Rousey (I think). Perhaps a linguist will help. 60514 (again, I think) is Shamosair (it's also an Alpine mountain), and 60530 is Sayaji Row (as in quarrel). 

60128 was always phonic to us sprogs, but, also being French, it should be pronounced Bongrarse. 

 

Oh those lovely loco names. Which has set me thinking..............

 

My personal opinion as to loco names, could be listed thus.........

 

Best of all; the P2s.

The most absurd; the Gresley A3s (though not every one).

Really good; The 'Britannias'.

Also very good; the 'Kings' and the 'King Arthurs'.

Most jingoistic; the 'Lord Nelsons'. 

Most educational; the 'Jubilees'.

The most boring; 'Halls', 'Granges', 'Manors', etc.

The daftest; 'The Red Nose' on a Virgin HST some years ago, though other modern names are running it close. 

The most literate; the various classes named from the Scott novels. 

Those with the most correct English; the post-War 'Counties' - not perpetuated by British Rail with things like 'County of Cambridgeshire', for instance.

The most patriotic; obviously the 'Patriots' (at least some) and the 'Royal Scots'. 

 

There must be dozens of others...........................

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

I was quite impressed by the painstaking and thorough naming of the WDs:boredom: 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I've been doing a few more panning experiments this morning, with various degrees of success and failure. 

 

It would seem to be the best combination (along with luck) is to set the ASA to 100, fully open the iris and use a shutter speed of about 25th of a second, with the locos doing about a scale 100 mph

 

Has anyone else tried doing this on their model railways? 

 

Ive done some a few years back on Retford and Leamington, I’ll see if I can dig them out. I also did them on Albion Yard, it being much shorter 10ft, the speed was slower, I think I used 1/8th sec f2.8 100asa on a 70-200 zoom. Single shot mode with autofocus tracking on. Bachmann 57xx, this was one of the first sound fitted Panniers I’m aware of. It’s a SWD chip hard wired into an early release, and written up for the Modeller in 2007

https://albionyard.wordpress.com/dcc-sound-pannier-conversion/

How time flies! (I also managed to get almost a full album of Springsteen song titles into the article..)

D376DC92-84FB-469D-9820-FF6F95704CF3.jpeg

Edited by PMP
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7 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 I once wrote some notes regarding these for a magazine and found that several were tautological (GNU and WILDEBEESTE for instance) and others were the same species but with different dialect spellings of their names.

 

 

 

There is a way of telling the difference between a gnu and a wildebeest.

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You can't paddle a wildebeest.

 

(I'll get me coat...…..)

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52 minutes ago, Clearwater said:

Its elsewhere on the site, but thought would add here too.  Market Deeping has set up a crowd funding page::

 

https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/market-deeping-mrc

 

 

 

Amazing, I just watched nearly £1,000 added less than five minutes.  Hopefully it will go some way to give a psychological as well as a financial boost to the club.

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1 minute ago, Chamby said:

 

Amazing, I just watched nearly £1,000 added less than five minutes.  Hopefully it will go some way to give a psychological as well as a financial boost to the club.

 

Agreed - it’s going viral.  Shows some hope for humanity!

 

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6 hours ago, Mallard60022 said:

Regarding the names for B1s, I was and am hopeless at trying to get my vocals around some Pacific examples. Sad I know but how is 60117 pronounced? Also 60514 and 60530. I can manage 60536 but that is only because of life experience.

P. Hil

I bet that whatever way they were supposed to be pronounced, or whatever way the owners pronounced them, the bookies and their clients definitely had their own pronunciation and it sounded totally different from anything else.

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Posted (edited)

Perhaps I go against the grain but I always thought the LNER naming policies were inspired. I thought many of the A3 were named after racehorses, was that not the case or was it the later A1s that were racehorse names? The Bongos – well I like them even if nobody else does. To me they are more interesting and engaging than Kings and Queens or Dukes and Duchesses et al.

 

The pronunciation that caught me out was the LMS Jubilee Galatea.

 

I thought the 'Schools class' was an odd choice of naming by the Southern but always liked their far more down-to-earth concept of locomotives bearing the names of humble villages, towns and urban districts served by the railway.

 

I wonder if the LMS could have come up with enough names for the Black Fives all with an association to 'black'. 

 

 

 

Edited by Anglian
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19 minutes ago, Anglian said:

Perhaps I go against the grain but I always thought the LNER naming policies were inspired. I thought many of the A3 were named after racehorses, was that not the case or was it the later A1s that were racehorse names? The Bongos – well I like them even if nobody else does. To me they are more interesting and engaging than Kings and Queens or Dukes and Duchesses et al.

 

The pronunciation that caught me out was the LMS Jubilee Galatea.

 

 

Whilst agreeing to an extend bout the LNER naming policy, when it comes to B17.....there is a team missing. :ireful:

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28 minutes ago, robertcwp said:

Which one is that?

One of the English clubs in the Europa Cup.  And hopefully winning on Wednesday night. 

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Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, Clive Mortimore said:

One of the English clubs in the Europa Cup.  And hopefully winning on Wednesday night. 

The team that will hopefully be winning on Wednesday night did have a B17 named after it 2848... :P

 

Edited by The Fatadder
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This thread has been a very bad influence on me, I seem to have just acquired a second hand kit for an A4.    Too much time spent reading about kit building and the LNER...

It will be finished as Mallard on the 26th April 1948 when it hauled a Paddington - Penzance express (before failing on the return working the next day and being replaced by Seagull for the timed service).  

 

Once it arrives it will be given a dunk in break fluid and stripped down to its component parts before rebuilding.

 

Tony, I don't suppose that you have ever written an article on building the Wills / SE Finecast A4?  Are there any pitfalls to be aware of?  Thanks to our conversation at Bristol I remember that the tender is going to need to be modified.   I am dreading building that outside valve gear, but that will just make it all the more satisfying once its done. 

 

thanks 

Rich

 

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28 minutes ago, Clive Mortimore said:

One of the English clubs in the Europa Cup.  And hopefully winning on Wednesday night. 

Still means nothing to me.

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1 hour ago, Anglian said:

Perhaps I go against the grain but I always thought the LNER naming policies were inspired. I thought many of the A3 were named after racehorses, was that not the case or was it the later A1s that were racehorse names? The Bongos – well I like them even if nobody else does. To me they are more interesting and engaging than Kings and Queens or Dukes and Duchesses et al.

The pronunciation that caught me out was the LMS Jubilee Galatea.

I thought the 'Schools class' was an odd choice of naming by the Southern but always liked their far more down-to-earth concept of locomotives bearing the names of humble villages, towns and urban districts served by the railway.

I wonder if the LMS could have come up with enough names for the Black Fives all with an association to 'black'. 

 

I have always loved the names of the King Arthurs. Just say Sir Dodinas le Savage and not make it sound French. Then look at Sir Colgrevance and not wonder who he was and where he came from?

Also, despite Tony's rather cool feelings about the GWR choices, how can we not be amused by Willey Hall or feel huge pride about  Earl of Plymouth or Sir Edward Elgar?  

Here is a little quiz for those that probably didn't get the opportunity to see many. Who can list the Bulleid West Country Class loco names that are the 'odd ones out' (does not include the Battle Of Britain examples); you could get 8. 

Phil

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6 minutes ago, Mallard60022 said:

I have always loved the names of the King Arthurs. Just say Sir Dodinas le Savage and not make it sound French. Then look at Sir Colgrevance and not wonder who he was and where he came from?

Also, despite Tony's rather cool feelings about the GWR choices, how can we not be amused by Willey Hall or feel huge pride about  Earl of Plymouth or Sir Edward Elgar?  

Here is a little quiz for those that probably didn't get the opportunity to see many. Who can list the Bulleid West Country Class loco names that are the 'odd ones out' (does not include the Battle Of Britain examples); you could get 8. 

Phil

7005 only became Sir Edward Elgar quite late on (1957). It had been Lamphey Castle when new in 1946. Castle names got moved around a bit, with two names each being carried by four different engines,.

 

By odd West Countries, do you mean the settlements not served by the Southern Railway? Westward Ho (did the nameplate have the !?) would be one example, although Bideford was close. Combe Martin and Boscastle are other examples.  Might have been difficult for the SR to have served Lundy. I would not count ones such as Tamar Valley or Blackmore Vale.  Or, are you thinking of the ones without crests?

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