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58 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Indeed, Phil,

 

And I must express an 'interest' here.

 

I've given Accurascale many of my own Deltic photos to work from and I've written a personal piece for them describing this great class.

 

As I say, help where and when one can.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

the Accurasacle gang are a very nice set of gents. They listened to me when I suggested that the curve of the Deltic roof on the pre production model appeared to be a tad high. More to the point they never laughed at me stretched Lima effort.

100_5030a.jpg.d07b189af10f5e7f5446e1f128f0403e.jpg

This one needs its bogies modified, it is on Hornby class 47s at the moment. It had a pair of modified bogies  which it shared with my plasticard Type 3 but finding another set of power bogies I thought I can modify them...........................one day.

 

100_5031a.jpg.6c3e429cb2ae47cc47db7c01617c273a.jpg

 

Two more awaiting the paint shop. They are on Lima class 37 power bogies.

 

It was a great pity Lima didn't make their Deltic the full length and give it the correct size bogies when they changed from British H0 to 00 because I still think it has the impressive look of a Deltic which for some reason the Bachmann model didn't quite achieve. Hopefully the Accurascale will do.

Edited by Clive Mortimore
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22 minutes ago, Northmoor said:

BUT, Tony...... would it provide the full soundtrack from two minutes before the train passed?

 

On a summer's evening, you are sitting on a grassy bank with just the slightest breeze rustling the ground and a nearby tree.  Some distant binds chirping, possibly starlings?  Then the signal wires tinkle and in straining to hear, you can just make out a distant drone.  Then this is briefly drowned out by a passing car on the bridge crossing the line just a hundred or so yards behind you; the short flatulent "pfft" as the driver changes gear identifying the car un-mistakenly as a Morris Minor.  Then the drone again, louder this time, and a long two-tone blast on the horn as the train approaches the path crossing half a mile away.  The noise grows and grows until less than half a minute later, the howl reaches a crescendo as the Deltic roars past, the note dipping as it passes with the Doppler effect and soon drowned by the pulsing roar of every one of the 24 bogies behind, including a rat-tat-tat-tat of a wheelflat on one axle.  Then just the receding drone for another half-minute, another tinkle as the signal returns to danger, until all you are left with is the starlings and soft rustling of the grass again.

 

When a sound system can give this, I might be interested.  Until then, I recommend searching out some old Peter Handford LPs and playing them in you railway room.

 

Rob

 

DCC sound would indeed give you something like this, if your layout was long enough...  2 minutes away at a scale 90mph at 4mm to the foot is a little over 60 metres.  Allow another 60 metres for the sound receding away in the opposite direction...

 

Theoretically possible, but totally impractical.

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I've done very little modelling recently (or really since the start of the year). Having undergone four operations last year plus a follow up spell in hospital when I got an infection in the surgery wound I missed out on holidays. So this year I've already had three breaks to make up for it and there are more being planned. The most recent was a nearly three week spell in France with getting back just last weekend.

 

Since then I've steeled myself for some modelling and have started gently with three wagon kits from the NGS. They build in to an either option of a bogie bolster 'E' Bopol or Turbot bogie ballast wagon. I choose to make one bolster and two Turbots. Here's how far I've got with the Turbots - basically assembling the plastic body/chassis  :

 

DSC_7845.JPG.df09c8a08f6667e824f544df12028d07.JPG

 

And especially for Clive here's a pic I took of the RH&DR:

 

DSC_6088cr.jpg.5263ab541933859b7dfb8b829d07b771.jpg

 

G

 

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23 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 

One thing I did notice about the video was how loud those locos I've built with Portescaps are. It's a most-irritating whine, and, other than their ease of fitting, I cannot see any advantage to them. I'm told folk claim they'll pull anything, but big Mashimas and decent gearboxes do the trick for me, especially in the larger locos. The A3 going at over 250 mph (yes, that's it's scale speed!!!!!) is fitted with just such a combination. If nothing else, though that high speed was really little more than my showing off, it shows how good Norman Solomon's trackwork is. I had to slow down for the curves on the end, otherwise centrifugal force would have had the lot on its side! 

 

The thing I noticed about the video was the operation of the M&GNJR. Shouldn't trains have stopped when going from the double track to single track in order to pick up a token?

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5 minutes ago, 96701 said:

The thing I noticed about the video was the operation of the M&GNJR. Shouldn't trains have stopped when going from the double track to single track in order to pick up a token?

It would seem only those not equipped with the automatic Whitaker tablet-catching/collecting apparatus, Phi.

 

There was a device at Little Bytham Junction which performed this function, but I've yet to make it - non-working, of course. 

 

Anyway, you are right; apart from the Ivatt 2-6-0 in one of the shots, all the other locos didn't have the device on their tenders to exchange tablets automatically. How a non-automatic exchange of tablets could be done on the model is a moot point. On the real thing, the signalman used to walk down from his 'box and hand over/collect the tablets as appropriate from the drivers/firemen. 

 

I've never seen a working figure do this, even using DCC!

 

Regards,

 

Tony.   

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4 hours ago, Clive Mortimore said:

Some really nice models of Gresley A1s and A3s.

 

I cannot normally join in when discussing locomotive models. OK the project was abandoned for various reasons, none to do with the concept of the model. I was going to use Tri-ang Hornby Flying Scotsmen as a basis for a RH&DR based layout in 1/24 th scale. I didn't get too far. rdhr1.jpg.af466c62b05798a4413188ecedfaf30f.jpg

Seen on my former 4mm scale Hanging Hill layout.

 

I still have desires on building something similar, as the RH&DR is one of my favorite railways to visit.

Very nice Clive. One of my might-but-probably-never-will projects is Hythe in the early 1960s.

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2 hours ago, Chamby said:

 

DCC sound would indeed give you something like this, if your layout was long enough...  2 minutes away at a scale 90mph at 4mm to the foot is a little over 60 metres.  Allow another 60 metres for the sound receding away in the opposite direction...

 

Theoretically possible, but totally impractical.

I don't think you'd get the Doppler effect though.

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On 20/06/2019 at 09:22, davefrk said:

Thanks to Mr Spark LMS have run out of certain lamps and will have to do a casting session next week which was going to be a busy week anyway.

 

Dave.

I hope I'm on commission Dave!

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6 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

I don't think you'd get the Doppler effect though.

I have found even over 2m or so there is a small Doppler effect. Others have also noticed this. 

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9 hours ago, Northmoor said:

BUT, Tony...... would it provide the full soundtrack from two minutes before the train passed?

 

On a summer's evening, you are sitting on a grassy bank with just the slightest breeze rustling the ground and a nearby tree.  Some distant binds chirping, possibly starlings?  Then the signal wires tinkle and in straining to hear, you can just make out a distant drone.  Then this is briefly drowned out by a passing car on the bridge crossing the line just a hundred or so yards behind you; the short flatulent "pfft" as the driver changes gear identifying the car un-mistakenly as a Morris Minor.  Then the drone again, louder this time, and a long two-tone blast on the horn as the train approaches the path crossing half a mile away.  The noise grows and grows until less than half a minute later, the howl reaches a crescendo as the Deltic roars past, the note dipping as it passes with the Doppler effect and soon drowned by the pulsing roar of every one of the 24 bogies behind, including a rat-tat-tat-tat of a wheelflat on one axle.  Then just the receding drone for another half-minute, another tinkle as the signal returns to danger, until all you are left with is the starlings and soft rustling of the grass again.

 

When a sound system can give this, I might be interested.  Until then, I recommend searching out some old Peter Handford LPs and playing them in you railway room.

 

Rob

 

Ah, the unmistakable sound of the Morris Minor fart. My Dad has two - Morris Minors that is - one owned from 1972 when it was a year old, and another from 1981. Alas he is thinking of selling them now as he rarely drives these days.

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10 hours ago, Headstock said:

I've not had a lot of time for Railway modeling recently. I did finaly get around to painting and completing some teak carriages.

Gresley TK E12612.jpg

E12630.jpg

Gresley BTK E16195.jpg

Gresley TK 12680.jpg

Gresley TK.jpg

Thanks for posting these images, Andrew,

 

They show some of the most beautifully-natural carriages I've ever seen.

 

MJT kits?

 

Once again, they illustrate that this thread is abundant with images of personal model-making, self-reliance, creativity and observation of the prototype. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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1 hour ago, Bucoops said:

 

Ah, the unmistakable sound of the Morris Minor fart. My Dad has two - Morris Minors that is - one owned from 1972 when it was a year old, and another from 1981. Alas he is thinking of selling them now as he rarely drives these days.

I drove away from our wedding reception (all those years ago) in a white Morris Minor. Friends had written and drawn - very badly - various naughty suggestions and body-bits, using a guest's lipstick. I immediately took it through a car wash, which merely removed the dirt, highlighting even more the bright red suggestions!

 

The old girl (the car!) was at least 15 years old then, and not long after, the rod clutch siezed up, making it impossible to de-clutch. I drove it for a few more months (to school and back) just 'crashing the box'. It was stolen once, but found abandoned not far away. It would seem that even car thieves have standards! 

 

I finally got £5.00 from a scrap dealer for her (the car!).

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I am making a 2mm scale model of Valour, which is described in the 2mm section.  One Valour nameplate survives in the York National museum.  

A friend of mine mentioned that the other one had a chequered history: It is believed that the second nameplate remained at Gorton Works for some time after 1948, it was then affixed to the top of the doorway of a church in Openshaw Gorton that had railway links. The plate was cemented into place and photographed A few years later the plate was removed forcibly (or stolen) from the church door and nothing had been heard or seen of it since A conspiracy theory however exists: Just after the plate was removed from the church, the presiding vicar was reposted to a position in Australia. It is thought he may have taken the plate with him. The said vicar is reported as having died some 8 years past but nothing has come to light as to the whereabouts of the plate.

 

Anyone any observations on this, or are there other versions?

Tim

0D89B518-10A6-4062-9F9B-B77BB1BECB4D.jpeg

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The comments about the Hornby A1/A3/A4 valve gear are spot on. It is pretty awful and, if upgraded, would have finished off 2505 and 2596 nicely. I would certainly have done it if they were my models. I remembered this morning that I also commission built a pair of DJH A3 a few years ago.

 

blogentry-118-0-94485500-1356645476_thumb.jpgblogentry-118-0-70503100-1358694933_thumb.jpg

 

blogentry-118-0-04296600-1358694946_thumb.jpg

 

DJH valve gear out of the box isn’t too bad. The only thing that is a bit iffy to my eyes is the shape/size of the expansion link.

 

Along with other selected parts for replacement valve gear I drew a multi-layer etched expansion to support the Graeme King Thompson Pacific conversion kit. Here it is seen on a model of Great Northern that I did. I also corrected the return crank angle on the donor Hornby valve gear to lean forward on both sides. I’ve never made the expansion link part of the etch available commercially. Firstly to respect that the Thompson 4-6-2 project was Graeme’s baby and also, in hindsight, I felt the expansion link I drew was a bit undersized for 4mm scale.

 

78F31240-DC5E-4A0C-9617-9B636F7ED18E.jpeg.44f21707baa5fb7fc2168a96e223d088.jpeg

 

Finally here is an example of the Gresley Pacific valve gear from Comet applied to a full Comet A3/A4 chassis. The spec of the rest of this model is fully written up on page 97 of this thread. The Comet gear also isn’t bad, much better than Hornby, but does lack a certain “je ne sais quoi” in a couple of areas.

 

00DF90E0-9699-4169-A0DD-BE71EE4E8EF5.jpeg.f3215ff4bfd73e8b46fe88562cf790b9.jpeg

 

Are there any others out there worth commenting on? SE Finecast springs to mind. I don’t have experience of building the SEF product.  There are no others that I can think of that can be purchased as a full set of aftermarket rods and valve gear to improve a RTR model.

 

cheers...Morgan

 

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3 hours ago, Bucoops said:

 

Ah, the unmistakable sound of the Morris Minor fart. My Dad has two - Morris Minors that is - one owned from 1972 when it was a year old, and another from 1981. Alas he is thinking of selling them now as he rarely drives these days.

Yes our family has two; one is a 1949 lowlight that we've had for 30 years, but only worked for about 10 of those.  The other is a '55 convertible that's been substantially rebuilt twice (and needs it again before it's too far gone) but has been in our family since 1974, so we won't want to lose it.

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2 hours ago, Northmoor said:

Yes our family has two; one is a 1949 lowlight that we've had for 30 years, but only worked for about 10 of those.  The other is a '55 convertible that's been substantially rebuilt twice (and needs it again before it's too far gone) but has been in our family since 1974, so we won't want to lose it.

 

I don't really want my Dad to sell his - one's been in the family from before i was born the other from when I was 4. I won't try and stop him though, I don't have anywhere for them or the need for them. They are a  '71 traveller in bermuda blue and a 50-something (56?) convertible. Like yours, the convertible has had extensive repairs twice as well. The traveller has had some floor welding done in the last 10 years, and new wings but otherwise is unrestored. The only bits of wood that aren't original are one rear door and the post it attaches to - both damaged in the '86 storms!

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The SE Finecast valve gear is better but still wrong. In mid gear, the lifting arm should be in a straight line with the valve rod. In that respect, the Hornby one is right.

 

Also, the join between the top of the combination lever and the front end of the valve rod should be visible and not tucked away behind the curved fillet of the cylinder casing and the gap between the valve rod and the bottom edge of the footplate is too small.

 

So neither version is right.

 

Having said that, the overall appearance is much better than the RTR version as all the bits are in the right relationship to each other.

 

Anybody got a photo of a Finney one made up?  

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Can I join in.

 

seagull.jpg.db89a70f867619ac7ca1310f9bde9920.jpg

 

Holt Model Railways, Swansea, 1981. Note the skilled removal of front tension lock, and the carefully black painted wheel rims - and, er, that's your lot! Still gets a run every now and then though.

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GN via Graeme's  conversion kit. Yes I know about the Bogie wheels and the Tender lettering spacing already on the Green version , both will do for me !!! :lol:. The second  photo is the PDK version which I never liked, and was sold on when the much better Hornby based version was available and built.

 

For all the flack GN receives it is one of my favourites in LNER liveries of course none of that Khaki Green here. 

 

 

 

 post-7186-0-91142300-1482355814_thumb.jpgpost-7186-0-33592400-1489592844.jpgpost-7186-0-22696600-1489592883.jpg

Edited by micklner
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37 minutes ago, micklner said:

GN via Graeme's  conversion kit. Yes I know about the Bogie wheels and the Tender lettering spacing already on the Green version , both will do for me !!! :lol:. The second  photo is the PDK version which I never liked, and was sold on when the much better Hornby based version was available and built.

 

For all the flack GN receives it is one of my favourites in LNER liveries of course none of that Khaki Green here. 

 

 

 

 post-7186-0-91142300-1482355814_thumb.jpgpost-7186-0-33592400-1489592844.jpgpost-7186-0-22696600-1489592883.jpg

And GREAT NORTHERN does receive flak, Mick,

 

With justification? 

 

It's been said before, but the best bits in it came from Gresley, anyway - the boiler and the double Kylchap chimney. Though it was arguably an 'improvement' (and certainly more-powerful) than Gresley's original A1, it was nowhere near as good as a double chimney A3, which it would have become had Thompson not had it rebuilt. It was far less-reliable than an A3 and, instead of being the forerunner of a class of post-War A1s (which Thompson presumably had intended it to be?), it remained an unloved and unreliable one-off. Other than the divided drive and independent valve gear, the actual Peppercorn A1s (one of Britain's best 8Ps?) owed nothing to GREAT NORTHERN. 

 

As for 'khaki' green (I thought khaki was the sandy colour of desert tanks), I cannot remember it very well. I was in my second year on this planet when the LNER ceased to exist (for the first time!), though I can just recall brand new, bright green B1s in the very early-'50s. They'd be branded 'British Railways' of course. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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16 hours ago, Headstock said:

I've not had a lot of time for Railway modeling recently. I did finaly get around to painting and completing some teak carriages.

Gresley TK E12612.jpg

E12630.jpg

Gresley BTK E16195.jpg

Gresley TK 12680.jpg

Gresley TK.jpg

 

These are simply stunning.

 

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