Jump to content

Andy Y

Product Spotlight - Humbrol Enamel Washes & Weathering Powders

Recommended Posts

As a bit of advertorial we're focussing on the usefulness to modellers of some Humbrol products which are widely available but perhaps not considered as a product of choice.

 

web_banner_800x800.jpg

 

Enamel washes

 

Humbrol have recently launched a range of pre-mixed enamel washes useful for detail enhancement and weathering. I've already found it useful to have a consistent mix of a ready-to-use wash rather than preparing a mix on the hoof.

 

The introduction video contains an excellent demonstration in enhancing panel lines which is likely to be of interest to those improving RTR D&E models. From 5:23 there's also a very good description of creating mortar courses in brickwork.

 

 

 

 

Weathering Powders

 

Subs_Offer_2.jpg

 

A few months ago we ran a very popular subs offer in BRM for the weathering powder range. Humbrol have produced some useful videos demonstrating the products in action.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combining the products

 

The following instructional video massively improves an RTP Skaledale product with an individual finish and would certainly make your resin buildings look as though they haven't just fallen out of the box!

 

 

There you go; an hour's worth of useful tutorial information!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As you say, some brilliant videos well worth watching. The only downside is a lot of shops stock the Humbrol paints, but not all the other Humbrol products.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will watch the videos to pick up any new tips,tricks or techniques that might help improve my skills.

Unfortunately my local shops, which do all stock Humbrol paint are not yet stocking their washes,powders or pigments.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It does rather remind me of the supermarkets need to sell Bathroom cleaner and Kitchen Cleaner in seperate bottles.

I'm sure they will shift plenty and they are indeed a quality product from a Yorkshire company,priced accordingly.

 

Best regards

Eric & Gripper.

Edited by Eric & Gripper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps a very useful product combination for those who are yet to dabble in the dirty and murky world of mucking up your models.

 

Easy to knock by those already with an experienced and light touch in these matters, but just the thing for an off the shelf novice.

Edited by Kenton

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on where you live. In the London area Hamleys stock the paints and weathering powders but not the washes, nor Clear nor DecalFix. I was able to pick up some before Modelzone's demise. Kent Garden Railways have usually served as my main supplier for these. I am sure they are not the only stockists.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely soft west Midlands accent, he should do the voice-over if a BCB video is made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He's a Brummie, if we got a real Black Country lad we'd have to have an interpreter for those in the wider world. :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely soft west Midlands accent, 

 

I've never heard my accent called 'lovely' before. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bought some of these products before seeing this thread. Another (sighs) thread I have to now follow.......................  :jester:

 

I agree nice accent. Poor bloke is probably suffering  :blush: And thank you for thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not certain how well this will demonstrate a very useful feature of the Humbrol Washes. Following the Humbrol video I thinned some black wash with Humbrol Thinners and using a brush ran it into the door surrounds of this Hornby Thompson coach that I tweaked in my "Reproducing Varnished Teak" thread.. I did have to use thinners to clean it up a bit afterwards and I have a strong feeling the thinners is starting to remove the printed Teak effect, however I do feel that darkening these door seams does improve the appearance.

 

post-3717-0-08235500-1380825564_thumb.jpg

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tested the technique with the Weathering powders, varnishes and the Thinners, and found it to work quite well. Unfortunately, I rather work with Vallejo's weathering powders that are quite cheaper (about the double in quantity for a price only 20 % higher than the one of the Humbrol's... As for the washes, I'm using acrylic ones, as I'm not yet able to find those from Humbrol back here in Belgium... Hope they arrive in time to be able to test them for my weathering book...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

using the Humbrol powders is one thing- fixing them is a topic that I have searched for in vain-

I understand that MIG sell a pigment fixer but is it compatible with the Humbrol powders?

Also I fear that using an airbrush will blow away most of the handiwork so I presume that any fixer needs to be very dilute so as to flow with very low air pressure.

Should one "overdo' the weathering effects in the knowledge that some/most will be blown away?

A few questions here-

just need a boffin to help me out!

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

on one of the videos weathering a B1 loco it shows a gentle distant blow over with a aerosol can of humbrol varnish to seal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so presumably using a gentle mist with the airbrush will do the same?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting looking products, have to make some time to look at the videos.

Many thanks,

Dave.T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Nelly,

 

As to fix the pigments, I'm commonly using charcoal fixative. It's in a spray can, and when sprayed from around 20 cm (about 15 inches) from the model with a shaky motion (as they do in the loco weathering video) it works great.

 

An other way is to mix the pigments with either the varnishes, but I also mix them with Vallejo Model Wash paints (thus reinforcing or modifying their color while also giving it more grainy texture) or by using some pigments binder (they propose this product in the Vallejo range, I do not know if they do in the Humbrol one).

 

Hope I've been helpful.

Eric.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used these produces on a number of weathering projects and I must say they are superb! I weathered my first loco with them yesterday and I am over the moon with it! Please tell me what you think of the results. :paint: 

 

post-20663-0-04547200-1384947411_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-20433100-1384947462_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-72178200-1384947510_thumb.jpg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice weathering, SDJR7F88.
 

I would just add a few advices : around the rods and cylinders, you should avoid using reddish rust colour. Those parts were more of a grease-ashy satin black-grey colour. What I'd advise is to use a mix of Gloss and Matt cote and to add a mix of Black weathering powder lightened a bit with a hint of white weathering powder on those rods and on the rear front of the cylinders. Also, this color can be added on the buffers to simulate grainy grease. Rust (a darkened one) should only be used with care on a working locomotive, mainly around the brake shoes and lightly drybrushed on some areas of the chassis and the body of the engine.

 

This said, this is a really good weathering you've done there.

 

Keep up the good work,

Eric.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Nice weathering, SDJR7F88.

 

I would just add a few advices : around the rods and cylinders, you should avoid using reddish rust colour. Those parts were more of a grease-ashy satin black-grey colour. What I'd advise is to use a mix of Gloss and Matt cote and to add a mix of Black weathering powder lightened a bit with a hint of white weathering powder on those rods and on the rear front of the cylinders. Also, this color can be added on the buffers to simulate grainy grease. Rust (a darkened one) should only be used with care on a working locomotive, mainly around the brake shoes and lightly drybrushed on some areas of the chassis and the body of the engine.

 

This said, this is a really good weathering you've done there.

 

Keep up the good work,

Eric.

 

 

Thanks Eric! Glad you like it and thanks for the tips! Was not too sure about the reddish rust my self (it looks a bit better in the flesh, more toned down), but then again this is my first attempt at a loco. Will be posting some picture of some of my weathered wagons soon too! :paint:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some examples of my weathered wagons! Sadly I do not own any of these wagons any more, as people loved them so much they brought them from me! :jester: Again I used Humbrol Powders and also some Humbrol Acrylic Authentic Rail Colour Rust mixed with a bit of Humbrol 33 Matt Black. I apply this mixture of paint with a sponge to achieve the flaky rust effect on the steel sided wagons and the metal frame work on the other wagons. Please tell me what you think! :paint: 

 

post-20663-0-36840500-1384953481_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-43803000-1384953488_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-06517100-1384953495_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-14722900-1384953502_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-29072700-1384953510_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-27481100-1384953518_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-61365000-1384953525_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-58686100-1384953548_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-98156400-1384953555_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-65431400-1384953562_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-93307700-1384953569_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-19249100-1384953577_thumb.jpg

post-20663-0-63343000-1384953584_thumb.jpg

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.