Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I suspect that, at the time Edgware would have been built, the cost of land would have been low enough to enable the GN to use simple trackwork wherever possible.  However, the double slip does not look out of place in your mock-up.  I use one at the entrance to my goods yard and it does provide contrast (a different dimension or "feel") to  simpler trackwork.  My vote would be to use it - good luck with the wiring!

  • Like 1
  • Agree 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, manna said:

G'day Folks

 

Going to ask for a bit of help today, Edgware isn't strictly to scale, with the branch to London Colney and St Albans, which makes Edgware a Junction of sorts, with all the extra traffic, I'm going to add a small engine shed. I picked up a double slip for $20 yesterday, which I want to incorporate into the goods yard, there is a small headshunt siding, but by fitting the double slip, it'll give me a bigger headshunt (3') siding making shunting more realistic. First pic shows where it's going to go. Pic 2, in place. Pic 3 Where the loco shed will be. does it look realistic. pic 4, Is Atlantic 3299 passing 'The Hales' goods yard.

 

 

manna

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Short answer: Yes.

 

Long answer: Yes, it's just the sort of place you'd find a double slip, in a yard.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, manna said:

G'day Folks

 

Going to ask for a bit of help today, Edgware isn't strictly to scale, with the branch to London Colney and St Albans, which makes Edgware a Junction of sorts, with all the extra traffic, I'm going to add a small engine shed. I picked up a double slip for $20 yesterday, which I want to incorporate into the goods yard, there is a small headshunt siding, but by fitting the double slip, it'll give me a bigger headshunt (3') siding making shunting more realistic. First pic shows where it's going to go. Pic 2, in place. Pic 3 Where the loco shed will be. does it look realistic. pic 4, Is Atlantic 3299 passing 'The Hales' goods yard.

 

 

manna

 

 

 

I'd go for it!  Your logic is good, it looks good and as other have said it is good!

 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

G'Day Folks

 

Thanks for that, OK, tomorrow, if the river don't rise, I'll dig out the old track/ballast and give it a go.

 

manna

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The GN loved slips both double and single,  if you take Sandy as an example there were 8 double and single slips spread across the yards and running lines.

I say fit it.

Manna.JPG.67a3e205d82d41dd9576ff2a36133aae.JPG

Edited by chris p bacon
  • Like 6
  • Informative/Useful 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, chris p bacon said:

The GN loved slips both double and single,  if you take Sandy as an example there were 8 double and single slips spread across the yards and running lines.

I say fit it.

Manna.JPG.67a3e205d82d41dd9576ff2a36133aae.JPG

G'day Folks

 

I'd forgotten about the double slips on the GN 'Long' crossings. You are right, they did love them.:D

 

manna

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, chris p bacon said:

The GN loved slips both double and single,  if you take Sandy as an example there were 8 double and single slips spread across the yards and running lines.

I say fit it.

Manna.JPG.67a3e205d82d41dd9576ff2a36133aae.JPG

Was there a speed restriction when slips were used on (main) running lines?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, teaky said:

Was there a speed restriction when slips were used on (main) running lines?

 

 

Not so far as is known. Descriptions of trains passing through Sandy in the 1800's were of them in the 80's with the regulator full open. I often wonder that some drivers actually pushed the regulator so far it went 360 degrees back to normal stops.

  • Informative/Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, teaky said:

Was there a speed restriction when slips were used on (main) running lines?

 

 

I think the 'issue' with slips in running lines is with double slips, not single slips, as there is a point in them where check rails are theoretically not able to stop the wheels going either way at the crossing?  Not that they usually do .... Which doesn't apply to single slips?

 

  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

G'Day Folks

 

Well the river didn't rise and a couple of hours in the shed saw the redundant track removed and the new(ish) track place where it will be laid  (time permitting)

 

Which brings me to the next problem (don't they multiply), a coal supply, (I have water columns), do I build a old type coal stage or a bit more modern LNER electric coal hoist ( like KX bottom shed !!!) the type 31A built last year.

 

manna

DSCF4944.JPG

DSCF4943.JPG

DSCF4942.JPG

DSCF4948.JPG

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, manna said:

G'Day Folks

 

Well the river didn't rise and a couple of hours in the shed saw the redundant track removed and the new(ish) track place where it will be laid  (time permitting)

 

Which brings me to the next problem (don't they multiply), a coal supply, (I have water columns), do I build a old type coal stage or a bit more modern LNER electric coal hoist ( like KX bottom shed !!!) the type 31A built last year.

 

manna

 

 

 

 

 

A mechanical coal stage would look good, but tricky to build unless (or even if!) you can get hold of one of those kits I had!  They did tend to put them in at some quite small depots - Hatfield had one.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

G'Day Folks

 

31A, I'm sure I can build one out of plastic, it'll be right at the back of the layout.

 

manna

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, manna said:

G'Day Folks

 

31A, I'm sure I can build one out of plastic, it'll be right at the back of the layout.

 

manna

 

@Clive Mortimore made one out of plastic for his layout! 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

G'Day Folks

 

A bit of time allowed me to lay a couple of feet of track plus the double slip, and it works, I had my fingers crossed.  I now have the arrival road and headshunt operational again, any more time will allow me to lay the track in the loco yard.

 

manna

DSCF4951.JPG

DSCF4952.JPG

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That first pic shows a poor alignment on the double slip.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, stewartingram said:

That first pic shows a poor alignment on the double slip.

G'Day Folks

 

Is that on the line on the bottom left of the pic ?? I know that has a slight kink, I'll have to dig out a bit of ballast, so I can slew it around a bit.

 

manna

 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

G'Day Folks

 

After lighting the log burner in the shed and letting it warm up a bit, the track work in the loco shed was tackled, laying the track where I think is best. Then it was all pined down, we have a storage siding beside the shed, visible from passing trains, then the shed road, behind the shed is the coal road complete with a kick back siding for empty coal wagons a cripple loco's. My very old Dublo Brake-Down now has a home behind the shed, and the snow  plough is parked at the end of the headshunt. Next track job, sort that double slip kink out!

 

 

manna

DSCF4967.JPG

DSCF4970.JPG

DSCF4968.JPG

DSCF4973.JPG

DSCF4972.JPG

DSCF4975.JPG

Edited by manna
  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that all seems to have worked out nicely!

 

I like your snowplough - it looks 'ingenious'!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

G'Day Folks 

 

The snow plough started off as a GN tender, but I fitted the wrong sized wheels on it, so I made it into a snow plough, the back half is a Hornby van, the 'pointy' bit is scratchbuilt, only took 24 hours.........maybe one day it'll get a rebuild.

 

manna

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, manna said:

G'Day Folks 

 

The snow plough started off as a GN tender, but I fitted the wrong sized wheels on it, so I made it into a snow plough, the back half is a Hornby van, the 'pointy' bit is scratchbuilt, only took 24 hours.........maybe one day it'll get a rebuild.

 

manna

 

Looks good to me!  :good_mini:

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 19/04/2020 at 10:40, Joseph_Pestell said:

Lots of interesting "might-have-been" modelling possibilities with the Northern Heights lines on the basis that the passenger services had not been completely taken over by the Underground.

 

Perhaps the best would be tube services terminating at Finchley Central (quite far enough to travel on 1938 stock), as well as larger gauge Underground stock from Moorgate. To that could be added steam or DMU services from Broad St and Kings Cross as well as freight.

 

I have been trying to look up the track layout to the south east of the station but old-maps.co.uk has been running very poorly since C-19 shutdown.

 

Edit to add: And that's all before we consider the possibility (as per Hornsey Broadway) of the High Barnet branch being extended to become a diversionary route for the ECML.

 

I was tempted by a slightly more modern twist on the idea with 313s from Moorgate running into East Finchley via Finsbury Park. Some would turn back north of the station while others would continue onwards towards Finchley Central.

 

Also the milk tanks are very interesting. Does anyone have photos of the Unigate bottling plant at East Finchley. Several old maps show it on the HIgh Road, just north of the station but I can find any photos of it from either the road or the rail side. The notes I have state it opened in 1928 and supplied by tanks from Ingestre. If correct, this would make it one of the first (if not the first) LNER creamery to be served by tanks rather than churns.

 

image.png.dbc290f5245c2dd7ebe6c11e0e164588.png

Edited by Karhedron
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Karhedron said:

 

I was tempted by a slightly more modern twist on the idea with 313s from Moorgate running into East Finchley via Finsbury Park. Some would turn back north of the station while others would continue onwards towards Finchley Central.

 

Also the milk tanks are very interesting. Does anyone have photos of the Unigate bottling plant at East Finchley. Several old maps show it on the HIgh Road, just north of the station but I can find any photos of it from either the road or the rail side. The notes I have state it opened in 1928 and supplied by tanks from Ingestre. If correct, this would make it one of the first (if not the first) LNER creamery to be served by tanks rather than churns.

 

image.png.dbc290f5245c2dd7ebe6c11e0e164588.png

Can't answer directly but I do remember the line disappearing under the footbridge (very early 1960s). I never found out where it went or what it was used for. Could that have been something to do with the milk depot?

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, St Enodoc said:

Can't answer directly but I do remember the line disappearing under the footbridge (very early 1960s). I never found out where it went or what it was used for. Could that have been something to do with the milk depot?

 

I am pretty sure it was. I think the milk depot is actually larger than shown on the map above and the marked section was just where the milk floats departed. I think the building marked "Diploma House" was also owned by United Dairies (later Unigate) and was part of the bottling plant. The siding seems to run straight into it. I have red a report that it had its own petrol shunter too although that seems excessive for a single siding. I would love to see some photos of what it was actually like.

 

My grandparents lived in East Finchley and I know the station well but the goods yard and that siding had long gone by then.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Karhedron said:

 

I am pretty sure it was. I think the milk depot is actually larger than shown on the map above and the marked section was just where the milk floats departed. I think the building marked "Diploma House" was also owned by United Dairies (later Unigate) and was part of the bottling plant. The siding seems to run straight into it. I have red a report that it had its own petrol shunter too although that seems excessive for a single siding. I would love to see some photos of what it was actually like.

 

My grandparents lived in East Finchley and I know the station well but the goods yard and that siding had long gone by then.

Thanks. I grew up in Mill Hill. The Edgware branch ran behind our school near Mill Hill East. I can just remember the goods yards at Finchley Central and East Finchley. I think they closed in 1962. Freights to Edgware continued until the line closed in 1964.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Karhedron said:

 

I was tempted by a slightly more modern twist on the idea with 313s from Moorgate running into East Finchley via Finsbury Park. Some would turn back north of the station while others would continue onwards towards Finchley Central.

 

Also the milk tanks are very interesting. Does anyone have photos of the Unigate bottling plant at East Finchley. Several old maps show it on the HIgh Road, just north of the station but I can find any photos of it from either the road or the rail side. The notes I have state it opened in 1928 and supplied by tanks from Ingestre. If correct, this would make it one of the first (if not the first) LNER creamery to be served by tanks rather than churns.

 

image.png.dbc290f5245c2dd7ebe6c11e0e164588.png

 

No photos I'm afraid but my late father told me the milk plant had it's own internal combustion engined shunter; he said it used to emerge from time to time to collect the tank wagons and made a lot of noise!  Yes, I believe it was the line that disappears beneath the footbridge on the map.  My father's house backed onto the railway opposite the goods yard, just off the map to the top left beyond the area shown as 'allotments gardens'.

  • Informative/Useful 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.