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Railroad Crosti 9F

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Very nice cut down leading wheels.  I have two of the Crosti's both without the smoke deflectors; does anybody know which numbers made it to the conversion without the smoke deflectors and in the large BR cycling lion logo?

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Very nice cut down leading wheels.  I have two of the Crosti's both without the smoke deflectors; does anybody know which numbers made it to the conversion without the smoke deflectors and in the large BR cycling lion logo?

 

All had the deflector fitted. The only example that has hard evidence of having the late logo before conversion is '021

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Yeah, that close-up was a bit "in yer face", but bear-in-mind that the pic is nearly three times bigger than the model on a desktop or laptop screen, plus i only gave it the heavy crud and blacked out windows near that dreaded side chimney, in fact i wanted to emphasis that there is where the muck came from. Here are some pics showing the rest of the loco, number is again changed to 92021 (thanks to Redgate for late emblem advice, bound to be a favourite number now), so this represents the loco after a few hard-working years, immediately prior to first withdrawal. All the period photos tend to show these beasts as rather unloved, did they ever bother to clean them (?), typically the emblem is virtually obscured by muck, the coupling rods and motion have got a coat of yucky yellowy grease and oil. If the r/h cab area weathering is viewed as excessive, it can be easily gone over and toned down in minutes with a wave of matt black, but i was trying to achieve that corroded pipes, smokebox priming, sulphuric acid look.

                                                    Cheers, Brian. 

 

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What did you you use? Was the black a pre used spray can.

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What did you you use? Was the black a pre used spray can.

It was different layers of water-based white and brown, plus oil-based matt black all via an airbrush, splatter is deliberate. The motion is a mix of weak yellow ochre in a larger amount of satin varnish.    BK

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I like it, great photo, thanks for finding this. Quite a lot of vertical staining on the tender side of the de-Crosti 8F (right) though, perhaps from filling the tender with water over a length of time? The regular 9F in the background is in a rather filthy state and very work stained. I found that many original Crosti pics circa late 50s, showed the tender emblem had disappeared under a layer of grime, especially on the r/h side for obvious reasons. Maybe i will give my 92021 an extra coat of matt black, there's still a bit of sheen on the boiler, plus it will take the edge off my water and acid staining at the same time.   BK

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Very nice cut down leading wheels.  I have two of the Crosti's both without the smoke deflectors; does anybody know which numbers made it to the conversion without the smoke deflectors and in the large BR cycling lion logo?

See post #595, p24 above re. crests.

Edited by John Tomlinson

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Here's an interesting photo, this is Crosti 92028 under repair at Cricklewood in 1956, so only a year old. The centre driving wheels and most of the motion have been removed for repair, maybe all for bearing repair or examination, otherwise why remove both? Looks like there's been a half-hearted attempt at cleaning the tender sides, but not the curved roll top, but all is now coated in a fresh layer of grime.     BK

https://www.flickr.com/photos/arthurmorley/4257036194

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Perhaps all is removed (both sides) so the loco can be shunted out to the yard? Crossheads and pistons still in position.   BK

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Has anyone else had any problems in chipping this model for DCC?

When I opened up the loco I found the DCC socket firmly covered with insulating tape, and a capacitor with very fine wires firmly embedded into the tape. I had to ease the tape away with tweezers,  and then take the tape off the capacitor. When I had done this, you can see a wire had come loose.

I quickly tried in a TCS DP2X-UK chip and tried the loco on the track, it did nothing.

I presume that the wire needs soldering into the small hole pointed out with the arrow?

9FDCC.jpg

Having chipped quite a few locos I can say this is the worst DCC ready setup I have encountered. I am sure there are worse, but this is not what I would expect from the newly designed loco.

Any suggestions/comments would be appreciated.

Jamie

EDIT: I quickly tried to solder the wire back to where I think it came from, but you can't solder into a hole, so I decided that I will contact the shop I bought it from and ask for a replacement. Whether the wire was loose in the first place, or of the tape had been put on too tightly, I feel the loco was not fit for fitting a chip. Others may have had more luck removing the tape, but compared with other 'DCC Ready' locos this was unfit for purpose.

Edited by Jamiel

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Well after a good look at the DCC chip board in daylight, I had another go. I unscrewed the board off the chassis, and threaded the loose wire through, then soldered it in place. I then put in the TCS DP2X-UK, took it out, and re-soldered the wire again, as it came away. It is a tight fit for the chip between the wires, second time lucky I got all the wires and the chip in place. Once in place the loco is a lovely runner, and I don't have to pay postage for a replacement.

I am still unimpressed by the positioning of the capacitor and the wires to the DCC chip board, it is not an easy plug and play as other locos I have encountered.

Anyway here is a photo of the loco running in, with some Dapol Class B tankers behind it, which will be one of its regular loads. They are waiting to have the RT Models detailing etches fitted, and to be painted too. A couple of barrier wagons are required, but for the moment it was good to see it run like this.

9FDCC01.jpg

Regardless of my opinion of chipping the loco, it is a lovely model, and here are some of the detailing  parts I have assembled to add a little extra to it.

9FDCC02.jpg

Brassmasters Ivatt/BR Standard front pony truck etch, a couple of detailing bags, one for a BR Standard 4-6-0,and one for the Duke of Gloucester (I think), only a couple of pounds on Ebay, but with some nice cylinder drain cocks, and some brake hangers I can play with. A Comet 9F detailing kit, not sure how much I will use, but it is there to play with, the detailing pipes that came with the Crosti, and some lamp iron etches. I also have a Parkside Dundas underframe kit with enough brake blocks to cover the wheels. There are also some front step etches and some front Alan Gibson wheels.

Some of this will also cover other models, but it gives me plenty to play with for the 9F. I just need the time now to do it. Hopefully it will come out OK.

I will post a photo when I have done the work.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Anybody looked into P4ing one?


 


Looks like it will be a 'turn down' jobbie as there doesn't seem to be any specific P4 drivers. Trouble is that the metal used by Hornby doesn't seem to take kindly to turning down. Baron H tried some Hornby coach wheels which proved to be very 'unfriendly' whereas Bachmann ones are fine.


Edited by Re6/6

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I didn't even realise these had been released.

 

Time was, when I'd have rushed out and bought one, but not any more.

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There's always 'proxy shopping' you know!

 

I could get you one by tomorrow!..........need...want...need..!

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There's always 'proxy shopping' you know!

 

I could get you one by tomorrow!..........need...want...need..!

I know and thanks, but I think I should pass on this one now.

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Well I made a start on the Brassmasters Ivatt/BR Standard pony truck, only to find that the width of the truck (as etched) is 15mm, which is wider than OO Gauge back to back (14.74mm) , although fine for EM (and I presume P4).

Has anyone else had any experience with this? I know that etches are probably more aimed at that specialist market, and also that my first attempt was not up to the standards of many of the modellers here. I will try and build a more suitable truck based on a scratch centre using the Brassmasters etch to form most of it.

9FTrcuk02.jpg

I posted a bit more in my Ellerby thread.

Still going to plow on with the detailing, I think the model is really good and it give me a nice project.

Jamie

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Good news today in the post.

My replacement gear (actually a full set!) arrived from Hornby, free gratis. I will hopefully get round to fitting them this weekend.

 

Stewart

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Well I made a start on the Brassmasters Ivatt/BR Standard pony truck, only to find that the width of the truck (as etched) is 15mm, which is wider than OO Gauge back to back (14.74mm) , although fine for EM (and I presume P4).

Has anyone else had any experience with this? I know that etches are probably more aimed at that specialist market, and also that my first attempt was not up to the standards of many of the modellers here. I will try and build a more suitable truck based on a scratch centre using the Brassmasters etch to form most of it.http://www.jamielochhead.co.uk/jpegs/Trains/9FTrcuk02.jpg

I posted a bit more in my Ellerby thread.

Still going to plow on with the detailing, I think the model is really good and it give me a nice project.

Jamie

I think when you bend the etch up it will be narrower than 15mm..

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Thanks Terry.

I'm afraid not. It is likely to be an EM/P4 etch. It had to be jammed in there. I started a thread on the subject of 4mm etches in the Modifying & Detailing RTR stock forum.

I have tried it with Alan Gibson wheel as well, finer than the Hornby 'pizza cutters'.

9FTrcuk04.jpg

Thanks for the suggestion though, I should have said that I discovered this once I had started building one of the etches.

Jamie

EDIT. Brassmasters confirmed that it etch is EM "The etch was designed for EM and P4. There is only one version."

Comet pony truck now ordered from Wizard Models.

Edited by Jamiel
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The Comet pony truck (LS2 bar frame type) arrived from Wizard Models this morning (only ordered on-line yesterday), and I built it this afternoon, and added some details from the Brassmasters etch as well. For a first attempt in modelling a moving part in brass I was quite pleased with the results. I didn't detail it as much as someone with greater experience and skills with brass might have, but even so I think it is a big improvement. Here is a photo of it next to a Bachmann 'sister'. I am sure there are those on the forum who could do something much more impressive, but as a beginner with brass it was a nice experience in the end.

9FTruck12.jpg

One word of warning, I did add a lug to take the spring that presses the Hornby truck down, but the spring just forced the etched truck off at every opportunity, so I gently pulled it out from the loco and let the truck's weigh hold it alone, and it ran fine.

Much more detailing to do, and I will post a detailed set of photos in my layout thread Ellerby on how I made the pony truck later.

Jamie

EDIT. A more step by stepversion is on my layout thread now at:
http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/53110-ellerby-at-last-back-to-some-modelling/page-10&do=findComment&comment=2056859

Edited by Jamiel
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Just an update on mine. Much earlier on this thread I reported that there were problems with the gears on mine, which I reported to Hornby. They replied originally that no spares had yet been received at that time. However in the last week, after a follow-up reminder email (as they suggested), I received a set of gears (free gratis too). I've just finished fitting them and re-assembling the loco, and it now runs beautifully. Thanks Hornby.

 

Just a footnote for those that complain about the price of locos today.

Assembly of the gears alone took me nearly an hour. And I am an experienced ex-Hornby service engineer, so start thinking about labour rates for assembly adding to the costs of building even Railroad models before complaining!...

 

Stewart

Edited by stewartingram
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I'm going to be replacing the front pony truck and have found two through Comet Models. Can someone tell me which is the correct one please? I suspect it is the 2nd one. Thanks.

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I'm going to be replacing the front pony truck and have found two through Comet Models. Can someone tell me which is the correct one please? I suspect it is the 2nd one. Thanks.

Yes, it is the second one. It is a multi-purpose etch but the diagram makes it clear what bits to remove and what to keep.

 

John

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