Jump to content

New video - Did Accurascale just announce a HAA?


Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, Colin_McLeod said:

@cheesysmith that would help for the ultimate accuracy, but with a danger of overthinking the whole thing. ;)

 

Meanwhile, do I continue my project of improving my 24 Hornby wagons, or flog them to fund some new models?

 

 

I think I’ll stick with my Hornby wagons. As they all have coal loads to fit them, replacing them would be an expensive business. I would rather spend my money on wagons I haven’t got and there are plenty of those.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold
2 hours ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

Purely for dust suppression.

The wagons were rated at 32 tons without the hoods so weren't capable of taking any extra loading.

 

Mike.

The MGR coal was generally very fine and not as large as domestic coal. It was much more prone to producing dust.

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Les_Gregory said:


I think there is one possible split, the published model wagon pictures I've seen so far all fall into the later, heavily internally reinforced at the top of the sides version, easily distinguished from the outside from earlier wagons by the row of rivets along the side about a foot down from the top. The original HOP AB and HOP32 AB had thinner sides at the top but strengthening cross members which gradually became bent and missing until most wagons had completely lost most or all of them, but the sides were still thinner, they had not been reinforced, so a earlier/later type split may be possible.

 

It's these early bodied hoppers that are required for those who model pre-1980 (ish). So far, Cavalex have said that these would follow after the rebuilt hoppers and the CDA's. 

 

However, I wonder though if news of a potential Accurascale model will deter them from progressing the early versions (assuming they're not already in an advance stage of development). Likewise, if Accurascale have decided to focus on the rebuilt wagons initially, they too may be put off.

 

Hypothetically, if Accurascale were focusing on the earlier variants while Cavalex are yet to develop these, then there wouldn't actually be any competition, as neither manufacturer would be producing the same wagon.

 

Worse case scenario, we get two manufacturers producing a post 1980 (ish) model, and no-one catering for 1960's/1970's - hopefully that won't be the case.

 

Cameron

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

Purely for dust suppression.

The wagons were rated at 32 tons without the hoods so weren't capable of taking any extra loading.

 

Mike.

I believe the original use of the canopy was for load in Scotland it may have been the mines were not producing as fine coal and it was volume rather than weight increase. The use of canopy for dust was late 80s and 90s when other wagons were also had canopy added presumably it was noticed the reduction in dust from some of the finer coal used in other areas from the original build wagons.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold
5 hours ago, shunny said:

I believe the original use of the canopy was for load in Scotland it may have been the mines were not producing as fine coal and it was volume rather than weight increase. The use of canopy for dust was late 80s and 90s when other wagons were also had canopy added presumably it was noticed the reduction in dust from some of the finer coal used in other areas from the original build wagons.

Not sure what your saying, but by early 90’s canopies were in use around Knottingley, west yorks.

Edited by adb968008
Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the original design concept incorporated the top canopy to carry additional load, but not many collieries had screens which could accept the higher wagons at the start of mgr operations. Those that did were predominantly in Scotland, and later progressively more long-life collieries converted as time went on.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

 

Perhaps we need to clarify "load"

MGR's were rated at 32 tons, so that ius their maximum weight limit. Power station fines are dense in volume so take up less space in the wagon, larger lumps of coal will therefore take up a greater volume, possibly projecting more above the top of the tub, so the capes would be fitted to prevent excessive dust being blown off and to prevent the lighter lumps of coal being blown off the wagon and thwacking some unsuspecting person at the lineside or on a platform.

In the late 60's/early 70's we had hood fitted MGR's going through Chesterfield, generally southbound ISTR, but I don't know what circuit they were on, we used to call them CovHops for want of a better name.

 

Mike.

  • Like 2
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the early 1980s coal dust was a serious problem because blow off settled in the ballast, blocking drainage, and producing wet spots, leading to rail damage. With dry coal, a loaded train passed by a 100mph express such as in the Trent Valley, could produce visible blow off. Wetting the load reduced the blow off, but in the end, the raised cape was more effective. I attended dozens of meetings between BR, CEGB and NCB trying to get the best balance between the practices across a range of collieries, power stations, and rail routes.

  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 18/10/2020 at 22:35, 25901 said:

On a fun note, the model out of the box can only represent a late 1960s wagon.

You ask why, have you even seen a spotless, scratchless and straight hopper apart from brand new.

Perhaps they'll produce weathered wagons, complete with bent hoods.

 

Hornby's weathered three packs always sold well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold
On 18/10/2020 at 23:35, 25901 said:

On a fun note, the model out of the box can only represent a late 1960s wagon.

You ask why, have you even seen a spotless, scratchless and straight hopper apart from brand new.

 

With reinforcing rivets and TOPS code markings?

 

Mike.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 18/10/2020 at 10:14, The Stationmaster said:

Obviously not HAAs but this photo of mine shows what folk are talking about in respect of the sort of coal being supplied to power stations - small stuff with a potentially high dust content (albeit imported coal in this instance) 

 

DSCF2876crrd.jpg.9739084c79302d76d1e4d05f00386f14.jpg

 

 

Yes, the irony is - if you use real coal in model loads its usually looks too clean and looks fake - glossy and shiny.  I know some coal used to get "blended" so good and poorer quality got mixed to make the coal as the generators liked it.  Too good and it burnt too well. 

 

Regards,

 

C.

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sure someone will have already mentioned it, but Retford Low Level was always a good place to inspect the coal the blew off a passing MGR train....

If you were really lucky you got to feel it, as well as see it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...