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Fourth bite: The Stables

Fourth bite: The Stables

Work has started on the fourth layout in the Farthing series. This will be named “The stables” and continues our meandering walk through the goods facilities at Farthing in the early 1900s.   The layout is inspired by my interest in GWR stable blocks, including the larger variants of the standard design that began to appear in places like Slough and Park Royal around the turn of the last century.    Slough, 1928. Source: Britain from Above. Embedding permitted. https://

Mikkel

Mikkel

Modifying, painting and storing figures

Modifying, painting and storing figures

Here’s a summary of my recent 'experiments' (a.k.a. mucking about) with Modelu and other 4mm figures, and how to store them.   I have previously modified figures from the Andrew Stadden, Dart Castings and Preiser ranges. So obviously, the Modelu range had to suffer too!  The resin used in these figures cannot be bent (it will break), but clean cuts with a scalpel worked OK. Joins were sanded, fixed with superglue and smoothed out with putty. Not everyone will think it’s worthwhile, but

Mikkel

Mikkel

The Finkerbury Files

The Finkerbury Files

Yesterday I went to get some things in the attic of the old apartment block where we now live. Each flat has a tiny storage room, and as I entered the attic I noticed that one door was ajar.     Feeling curious, I had a look inside. The room was empty,  but someone had left an old filing cabinet in the corner.     Imagine my surprise when, inside the cabinet, I found a number of files marked “Farthing”. With trembling hands I opened the first file, an

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Mikkel

Downsizing

Downsizing

The Farthing layouts have seen some major rebuilding in the past months.      In the early autumn, we sold the house and moved to a flat. Having made sure that the layouts survived the move without damage…        … I immediately cut them to pieces. It was clear from the outset that downsizing was needed, as the only place to store the layouts is in a small attic room reached by a narrow flight of stairs.        The Down Bay

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Mikkel

GWR large flat dray

GWR large flat dray

Here's the third and last instalment about my recent trio of horse drawn wagons. This is yet another GWR "dray", as they are commonly known. GWR drawings generally use the term "trolley", which I understand was the original and more correct term for what is today popularly called drays.     The wagon was built from an old Pendon kit, picked up on ebay. There is no mention of the prototype, but it resembles a 7 ton trolley drawing in the Great Western Horsepower book.  

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Mikkel

Ratkin & Son horse-drawn wagon

Ratkin & Son horse-drawn wagon

Here's another contribution to the RMweb "Horse Drawn Weekly" as Dave calls it. My efforts don't even get close to his superb models, but a horse is a horse as they say in Farthing. Today's subject is a wagon from Ratkin & Son, makers of finest jams and marmalades (or so they claim).       The build was inspired by scenes such as this one, showing the GWR sidings at Henley and Sons cyder works (sic) in Newton Abbot, October 1908. Source: Getty Images. Embedding permitt

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Mikkel

Kit-bashed GWR light dray

Kit-bashed GWR light dray

I've been finalising a batch of horse-drawn vehicles for Farthing. First one done is a light one-horse dray – or trolley, as the GWR called them. It's of a type that some GWR drawings refer to as the “Birmingham pattern”. There was a variety of designs of this type from the 1890s onwards, but the main distinguishing feature was the front-mounted protective tarp, and a carter’s box seat beneath it. The name shouldn't be taken too literally. Photos and drawings show that they were widely distribut

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Mikkel

Porters and Barrows

Porters and Barrows

These days 4mm modellers have an excellent choice of figures from Model-U, Andrew Stadden and Dart Castings - but there's always room for a bit of tinkering!   Here are some porters for Farthing Old Yard, modified and pieced together from various sources. The figures have all been attached to something - e.g. a barrow - as I find this helps "integrate" them once placed on the layout.   Our first subject mixes a Dart Castings body with an Andrew Stadden head and arm. The barro

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Mikkel

Lamps and Lamplighters

Lamps and Lamplighters

Yard lamps have appeared at Farthing, using a mix of scratchbuilt bits, modified parts from old whitemetal lamps, and modified Andrew Stadden figures. This is an early GWR platform type, based on old photos I have found. There was also a later, more sturdy variant. Thomas Grig, GWR Yard Porter and lamplighter, is looking a trifle worried. He never did like heights. Above is a standard 13ft column lamp. Most GWR yard lamps had hexagonal lamp housing, but the styl

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Mikkel

Buffer stops, point levers, fishplates, loading gauge, wall

Buffer stops, point levers, fishplates, loading gauge, wall

Here’s an update on the sidings at Farthing, or "Old Yard" as I have now dubbed this part of the station.     I have reached the point where detailing can begin. I'm going for the uncluttered look, although a few weeds etc will be added at some point.         Inside the "biscuit shed" we find an old timber built buffer stop. Like the shed itself, it is a survivor from N&SJR days, before the GWR gobbled up the proud little station and turned

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Mikkel

Same but different - early 1900s GWR wagons

Same but different - early 1900s GWR wagons

For the past year or so I’ve been adding to my fleet of early 1900s GWR wagons. The idea is to make each wagon a little different. Here’s a summary of some of the detail differences so far. First up is this gang of Iron Minks.     The Iron Minks were built from ABS kits, with replacement roofs from MRD. The grease axleboxes on 57605 were scrounged from another kit, and the deep vents on 11258 were made from styrene. The unusual hybrid livery of the latter van is based on my

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Mikkel

Pre-grouping livery clippings

Pre-grouping livery clippings

Here are a couple of PDF files that may be of interest to pre-grouping modellers.   The first document is an 1896 article from Moore's Monthly Magazine (later renamed "The Locomotive") on British pre-grouping liveries. It includes brief livery descriptions for a number of the railways (but not all).   MooresMonthlyLiveries.pdf   The second document is my personal selection of quotes and news items on GWR liveries and selected other liveries from the archives of the

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Mikkel

GWR Park Royal stable block

GWR Park Royal stable block

My model of the GWR stable block at Park Royal is now almost done. Here's an overview of the build and some pics of the finished item.     The stables at Park Royal followed the classic outlines of what I call the “Style B” of GWR stable blocks. Above is a sketch. The model itself was built using the GWR drawing that is reproduced in "Great Western Horsepower" by Janet Russell and in Adrian Vaughan's "Pictorial Record of Great Western Architecture".    

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Mikkel

Backdating the Oxford Rail Dean Goods (1)

Backdating the Oxford Rail Dean Goods (1)

Here’s a summary of the work so far on my attempt to backdate the Oxford Rail Dean Goods to 1900s condition. Thanks to everyone who has helped with advice and information.     My model is based on a 1903 photo of No. 2487, sporting the S4 roundtopped boiler and wide footplate. Various features such as a short smokebox, large cab spectacles and "piano lid" cylinder cover will make it a bit different from the superb Finney kit models out there - no other comparison intended!

Mikkel

Mikkel

GWR stables - towards an overview

GWR stables - towards an overview

The following are my notes on GWR stable blocks – a subject that does not seem to have received much attention. I am about to build one for Farthing, and have noticed various style differences that may be of interest to others.   Chipping Norton stables in 1983. Built 1904. Rebuilt with end doors to serve as a garage, but otherwise it features the main elements of the "archetype" standard design, ie "hit and miss" vents in windows and above doors, and those characteristic boxy roof

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Mikkel

Fake news and wagon sheets

Fake news and wagon sheets

On Twitter today:                   Anyway, enough fooling around. The wagon sheets (aka tarpaulins) seen in these photos are the preliminary results of experiments with aluminum foil. My original plan was to go the whole hog with cords and ropes etc, but as I started fitting sheets to my wagons I got cold feet. My wagons are nothing special but I like to look at them, and here I was covering them up!      

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Mikkel

Mr Gorbachev, tear down this wall

Mr Gorbachev, tear down this wall

Here’s an update on Farthing – and some new ideas.         The “biscuit” and “jam” sheds have been painted and are ready to embed on the layout. The buildings are an attempt to hint at the past railway history of the area. They were originally built for the old N&SJR terminus at Farthing, which was alongside the Great Western station. When the GWR swallowed up the N&SJR, it kept the buildings and used them as loading and distribution facilities for the town

Mikkel

Mikkel

Agricultural merchant's warehouse

Agricultural merchant's warehouse

Here's a summary of my latest build, an agricultural merchant’s warehouse, inspired by this prototype. As has become my habit I've modelled all doors open to allow for… ...see-through opportunities. That approach does mean that the interior walls and framing have to be indicated - don’t look too closely though! I used Will’s corrugated iron sheets for the main walls. They are rather thick so I fitted sliding doors on the outside

Mikkel

Mikkel

GWR 1854 Saddle Tank (2)

GWR 1854 Saddle Tank (2)

My GWR 1854 ST is now done. To recap, this is a much modified Finecast body on a Bachmann chassis. My original plan was to find an acrylic spray paint that gave a suitable representation of the pre-1928 green. When that failed, I was recommended the Belton bottle green which has the RAL code used for landrover green. However, while this and some of the others looked fine outside in the sun, they all looked wrong under my layout lights. So in the end I reverted t

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Mikkel

A shed and a lock-up

A shed and a lock-up

I’ve scratchbuilt some more buildings for Farthing.         First up is this small goods shed, adapted from a prototype built by Eassie & Co. at Speech House Road station on the Severn & Wye. The contractors Eassie & Co. had an interesting history, nicely described in this PDF file by the GSIA.         The prototype had a brick base, but I decided on a timber base and a few other detail changes to suit my tastes. The roof

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Mikkel

The Biscuit Shed

The Biscuit Shed

I've been working on the “Biscuit Shed”, the first of the buildings for my new Farthing layout. It is inspired by the “beer shed” in the GWR Goods yard at Stratford on Avon, which was used as a loading facility for beer traffic from the Flower & Sons brewery.         The biscuit theme draws on the so-called “biscuit siding” in Gloucester Old Yard, which served a small loading shed that was used by various industries over the years, including Peak Freen’s biscui

Mikkel

Mikkel

Rising from slumber

Rising from slumber

After a quiet spring things are moving again on Farthing. The Slipper Boy story is featured in the June 2016 BRM, which seems a good way to mark the end of work on that layout. Many thanks to BRM for featuring the story. It’s all just a bit of fun of course, but while studying the court case that inspired the story, it did occur to me just how much scope there is for modelling particular historical incidents on the railways.         Meanwhile there has been progres

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Mikkel

The honourable slipper boy - Part 3

The honourable slipper boy - Part 3

This is the third and final part of a story based on a real incident on the Great Western at the turn of the century. It draws on the transcripts of a court case at Old Bailey. The story is narrated by Dennis Watts, a slipper boy in the employment of the GWR. The story began here.     Having produced their damning evidence, Detective Benton and constable Walmsley rounded up the four thieves and took them to court. I was the star witness at the trial, and made sure to tell

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Mikkel

The honourable slipper boy - Part 2

The honourable slipper boy - Part 2

This is the second part of a story based on a real incident on the Great Western at the turn of the century. It draws on the transcripts of a court case at Old Bailey. The story is narrated by Dennis Watts, a slipper boy in the employment of the GWR. Part one is here.       As I stood there, surrounded by thieves in a dark corner of the goods yard, I thought my last hour had come. Luckily the moon came out, which seemed to unsettle them, and so they let me go.  

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Mikkel

The honourable slipper boy - Part 1

The honourable slipper boy - Part 1

This blog sometimes tells some pretty tall tales, but this one is based on a true story. I recently came across a fascinating account of a court procedure at Old Bailey, involving an incident on the Great Western at the turn of the century. I decided to re-enact the incident, with Farthing as the setting and a little, ahem, modeller’s license. Dennis, will you take it from here?       My name is Dennis Watts, that’s me on the right. I’m a slipper boy with The Great West

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Mikkel

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