Jump to content

A shed and a lock-up

Mikkel

1,684 views

gallery_738_1232_48147.jpg

 

I’ve scratchbuilt some more buildings for Farthing.

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_139914.jpg

 

First up is this small goods shed, adapted from a prototype built by Eassie & Co. at Speech House Road station on the Severn & Wye. The contractors Eassie & Co. had an interesting history, nicely described in this PDF file by the GSIA.

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_115735.jpg

 

The prototype had a brick base, but I decided on a timber base and a few other detail changes to suit my tastes. The roof is detachable so I can detail the interior.

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_47878.jpg

 

The doors are modelled open so you can see what’s going on inside. I like the effect but it does add to the time and cost as you have to model the interior walls and framing too.

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_40270.jpg

 

One reason I chose this prototype was the potential for a nice view through the open doors across the tracks, in line with my preference for “see through” structures at the front of layouts.

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_15222.jpg

 

There’s also a view through the side door. The prototype had the door right up against one corner, probably to save space inside. It looked odd in model form though, so I moved it. If only the real world was so easy to change!

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_135383.jpg

 

Here’s another little building I’m working on. This is a lock-up/storage room based on a prototype at Long Marston. There was a very similar structure at Lustleigh.

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_205835.jpg

 

My version is some 25% larger than the prototype, in order to add a bit of mass.

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_97149.jpg

 

I normally use the Wills sheets for slate roofs, but on this lock-up I thought I’d try out the slate sheets from York Modelmaking. I have seen them used with very convincing results, not least on Iain Robinson’s wonderful creations.

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_29126.jpg

 

Unfortunately I had forgotten how sensitive paper can be to glue stains and bending/fraying at the edges. Experienced card modellers would no doubt have made a better job of it!

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_34190.jpg

 

Here’s a direct comparison between the Wills sheets (left) and the York Modelmaking strips (right) before painting.

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_31117.jpg

 

I’m really not very happy with the roof, and may give it another try. Incidentally the prototype photo doesn’t seem to show any gutters or drainpipes, which puzzles me a bit.

 

 

 

gallery_738_1232_24319.jpg

 

The buildings in place on the layout.

  • Like 15


28 Comments


Recommended Comments



Lovely stuff Mikkel.

 

I do like the vista opportunities already becoming apparent in your shots above.

 

Maybe only the edge tiles could be replaced as am sure the stains can be lost in some subtle weathering ;)

 

Always happy to see progress on the Farthing layouts me :good:

Share this comment


Link to comment

Thanks Pete, yes the views are beginning to come out, although I keep adding to the depth of the baseboard in order to improve them. I'll end up with a square baseboard :-) 

 

Good idea about only replaceing the edge tiles, I hadn't thought about that. Will have a look to see if that's feasible. Those bargeboards are rather skinny too. 

Share this comment


Link to comment

Nice to see some building activities.

This is nicely modelled and I'm looking forward to further progress.

For the prototype you mentioned, Scalescenes something like that. in the past as a free download. I think you can find some pictures om the Internet. 

I think it will fit your layout very well.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Your buildings are an absolute pleasure to behold Mikkel.

 

And very neat and tidy modelling too - if I'd made those you'd see Mex-Pax bleed/stains all over the place (although they later disappear once painted, but that's not the point).

 

I really like your concept of  "see through structures”, something I've not thought about before. On Frankland I put a lot of planning into sightlines - and equally structures that block or force you into viewing the layout from certain angles - but viewing through is new to me and I thank you for that insight :)

 

Your last photo I particularly like: So starkly minimal, yet just those few key components on display invoke the Edwardian without any doubt.

 

I take my hat off to you yet again!

Share this comment


Link to comment

Splendid stuff Mikkel!  Love the attention to detail, those mitres on the inside framing must have been tricky!  For what its worth I think the slates are a big improvement over the Wills sheets, these look thin as they should do!

 

The mention of Farthing Road is a very interesting tease! :-)

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

Share this comment


Link to comment

Lovely modelling. Those buildings are a joy to behold. Looking forward to the finished jobs.

 

Rob

Share this comment


Link to comment

Mikkel,

Lovely modelling as one comes to expect from your good self.  I particularly like the concept of a view through the goods lock up.  I also feel that the Wills slates are somewhat outdone by the paper/card York ones - It is unfortunate that the end slates have suffered damage, perhaps they could be removed and replaced?  I'm sure painting/weathering will lose the glue leakage onto the few affected too.  As others have said quality modelling!

 

Ian

Share this comment


Link to comment

Nice to see some building activities.

This is nicely modelled and I'm looking forward to further progress.

For the prototype you mentioned, Scalescenes something like that. in the past as a free download. I think you can find some pictures om the Internet. 

I think it will fit your layout very well.

 

Hi Job, thanks for that. As for the Scalecenes kit, I'm not sure which of the buildings you mean? However since I have started my buildings in styrene on this layout I had better build them all with that medium. Some day I may try doing a layout with card buildings though - much cheaper than styrene, and healthier too when it comes to glue I imagine.

 

 

Your buildings are an absolute pleasure to behold Mikkel.

 

And very neat and tidy modelling too - if I'd made those you'd see Mex-Pax bleed/stains all over the place (although they later disappear once painted, but that's not the point).

 

I really like your concept of  "see through structures”, something I've not thought about before. On Frankland I put a lot of planning into sightlines - and equally structures that block or force you into viewing the layout from certain angles - but viewing through is new to me and I thank you for that insight :)

 

Your last photo I particularly like: So starkly minimal, yet just those few key components on display invoke the Edwardian without any doubt.

 

I take my hat off to you yet again!

 

Thanks very much Mark. My idea with see through structures is to (i) force the viewer to get down to eye level and explore the layout, and (ii) "puncture" the forbidding effect that viewblocks can sometimes have if they are too massive. The canopy on the bay platform and the mezzanine floor in the goods depot followed the same idea although on a larger scale.

 

gallery_738_870_15949.jpg

 

blogentry-738-0-89513100-1294179488_thum

 

 

Splendid stuff Mikkel!  Love the attention to detail, those mitres on the inside framing must have been tricky!  For what its worth I think the slates are a big improvement over the Wills sheets, these look thin as they should do!

 

The mention of Farthing Road is a very interesting tease! :-)

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

 

Hi Dave, thanks for this and I'm glad you mention those slates. I must admit I'm still not entirely convinced about the slate strips. I agree they look thinner, but I need to be able to build them more "cleanly" before they look convincing to me. Must give it another go.

 

Farthing Road is an idea I have to bring my modelling into our living room. It will therefore have to be very small indeed! 

Share this comment


Link to comment

Quality stuff.... if only I had the skills!

 

Thanks, I've just read your post about Restoration House. Intriguing stuff!

 

 

Very nicely done indeed Mikkel

 

Thanks Andrew, practising my structure modelling skills is a main point of this layout, and I'm learning a lot as I go along - including the differences between styrene products. I'm finding Evergreen a good deal easier to work with than Plastruct, for example (no connection to either). 

 

Lovely modelling. Those buildings are a joy to behold. Looking forward to the finished jobs. Rob

 

Hi Rob, many thanks! Yes I suppose I will have to paint them too :-) I actually enjoy painting but there is something very appealing about white styrene. Now there's a weird fetisch!

Share this comment


Link to comment

Mikkel,

Lovely modelling as one comes to expect from your good self.  I particularly like the concept of a view through the goods lock up.  I also feel that the Wills slates are somewhat outdone by the paper/card York ones - It is unfortunate that the end slates have suffered damage, perhaps they could be removed and replaced?  I'm sure painting/weathering will lose the glue leakage onto the few affected too.  As others have said quality modelling!

 

Ian

 

Thanks Ian, much appreciated. I will see what can be done about the roof. It would certainly save time if I can just replace the tiles at the edges. The end tiles are particularly exposed on this building as the barge boards were mounted below them, so I can't use them to hide the problem. 

Share this comment


Link to comment

 

Farthing Road is an idea I have to bring my modelling into our living room. It will therefore have to be very small indeed!

 

A layout in the living room! The domestic authorities at "Mikkel Towers" are obviously a lot more indulgent than those at "Chateau Wenlock" lol

Share this comment


Link to comment

Hi Mikkel I hope all is well with you and yours.

Just when I thought it'd all gone quiet :)

I've just caught up with this build Mikkel and I think you know what I'm going to say !

YEY !!! Crackin' work as per matey.

I'm pleased that you hit upon Lustleigh it's in my top three GWR western regional stations ( not living too far from the village ) . I've often considered modelling it as a broad gauge diorama, tiz proper 'ansome.

I think the York Modelling slates are better in use ( having used them myself too ) especially where a longer roof is required preventing that annoying join if you are using the Wills sheets, which are still a good product I hasten to add.

Look forward to the next instalment

Share this comment


Link to comment

Great work Mikkel.

 

Most impressive modelling. The slates look very good.

 

Cheers,

 

Mark

Share this comment


Link to comment

A layout in the living room! The domestic authorities at "Mikkel Towers" are obviously a lot more indulgent than those at "Chateau Wenlock" lol

 

Ah yes, well, you see... the domestic authorities have not been approached yet :-)

 

 

Hi Mikkel I hope all is well with you and yours. Just when I thought it'd all gone quiet :) I've just caught up with this build Mikkel and I think you know what I'm going to say ! YEY !!! Crackin' work as per matey. I'm pleased that you hit upon Lustleigh it's in my top three GWR western regional stations ( not living too far from the village ) . I've often considered modelling it as a broad gauge diorama, tiz proper 'ansome. I think the York Modelling slates are better in use ( having used them myself too ) especially where a longer roof is required preventing that annoying join if you are using the Wills sheets, which are still a good produce I hasten to add. Look forward to the next instalment

 

Hi Grahame, thanks a lot, I'm glad to have found someone who knows about Lustleigh as I've only just "discovered" it myself. It seems to have had it all, including bags of atmosphere.

 

Have you seen this: http://www.lustleigh-society.org.uk/lustleigh-and-the-railway/ - and this photo for sale on ebay which has a charm all of its own (click to enlarge):  http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Lustleigh-Railway-Station-Photo-Moretonhampstead-Bovey-Heathfield-Line-GWR-/251634120769

 

Great work Mikkel. Most impressive modelling. The slates look very good. Cheers, Mark

 

Thanks Mark, I see you're planning a Milkwall & Sling layout, not too far from Speech House Road then. I look forward to seeing it develop.  

Share this comment


Link to comment

There's plenty of atmos around the station and surrounding Teign Valley, the route from Bovey Tracey up to Moretonhampstead is really quite beautiful, and you can still make out the line of the old railway too.

 

When the weather permits I take my mountain bike over there and get onto Dartmoor in that area and try to ride the old track wherever possible ( sometimes pretending to be a BG loco going up the valley ! Big kid !!! )

 

I'm aware of the Lustleigh Community archive thank you, it's always useful for various reasons when looking into local history.

 

Cheers

Grahame

Share this comment


Link to comment

[quote name="Mikkel" timestamp="1472495498"

 

Thanks Mark, I see you're planning a Milkwall & Sling layout, not too far from Speech House Road then. I look forward to seeing it develop.

 

The Forest railways have always held a fascination helped by discovering Ben Ashworth's photos many years ago. A small layout based around Milkwall/Sling is on the cards one day.

 

Also the Teign Valley line is another interest and stock is being built or sourced for a project based around Trusham quarry.

 

Going back to the Farthings certainly looking forwards to seeing more progress.

 

Cheers,

 

Mark

Share this comment


Link to comment

I do enjoy the idea of providing 'interior glimpses', to give a sense of 'exploring' the layout, rather than having it all presented 'on a plate'.

 

Regarding encroaching into the living room - this is a tricky subject, although I'm fortunate, since the domestic authorities here are fairly well-disposed towards modelling. 

 

I recommend what a friend once described as a 'quantum tunnelling' approach:  i.e. keep trying a small 'breakthrough' and, once that's been accepted, nudge more things through the 'barrier'.  After getting one or two models onto a bookshelf, I now have my Broad Gauge diorama on an occasional table :)

 

Another approach is to make the railway useful.  For example, the Maharaja of Gwalior used a model train to carry drinks around the dining table.

 

Mike

Share this comment


Link to comment

There's plenty of atmos around the station and surrounding Teign Valley, the route from Bovey Tracey up to Moretonhampstead is really quite beautiful, and you can still make out the line of the old railway too. When the weather permits I take my mountain bike over there and get onto Dartmoor in that area and try to ride the old track wherever possible ( sometimes pretending to be a BG loco going up the valley ! Big kid !!! ) I'm aware of the Lustleigh Community archive thank you, it's always useful for various reasons when looking into local history. Cheers Grahame

 

Sounds good. Must put it on my bucket list (it keeps growing).

 

Pretending to be a BG loco, I like that. You'll have wide tyres fitted then? :-)

 

 

The Forest railways have always held a fascination helped by discovering Ben Ashworth's photos many years ago. A small layout based around Milkwall/Sling is on the cards one day. Also the Teign Valley line is another interest and stock is being built or sourced for a project based around Trusham quarry. Going back to the Farthings certainly looking forwards to seeing more progress. Cheers, Mark

 

Trusham quarry, that sounds interesting. I must read up on that. That's what I love about UK railways, you never run out of interesting places (well, historically at least).

 

 

I do enjoy the idea of providing 'interior glimpses', to give a sense of 'exploring' the layout, rather than having it all presented 'on a plate'.

 

Regarding encroaching into the living room - this is a tricky subject, although I'm fortunate, since the domestic authorities here are fairly well-disposed towards modelling. 

 

I recommend what a friend once described as a 'quantum tunnelling' approach:  i.e. keep trying a small 'breakthrough' and, once that's been accepted, nudge more things through the 'barrier'.  After getting one or two models onto a bookshelf, I now have my Broad Gauge diorama on an occasional table :)

 

Another approach is to make the railway useful.  For example, the Maharaja of Gwalior used a model train to carry drinks around the dining table.

 

Mike

 

Ha! Thanks Mike for this very useful advice on strategy. I think quantum tunnelling is just right for my situation. I was thinking of starting with a small boxfile thing.

 

I just googled the Maharaja of Gwalior's train, it was made by Bassett -Lowke it seems! 

 

9dc069704d1ba03e72f94dc68351268f.jpg

Share this comment


Link to comment

Hi Mikkel

 

After a long absence from the site it is good to pop back and find one of your posts, a most welcoming read indeed. Great work on the buildings and as you know I like that sort of thing and really must try and find time for it again, as for the slates I prefer to cut my own from 160gsm card as I can then control the widths to eliminate those narrow quarter slates on the end that are most prone to damage.

 

Great work as usual, I expect I have missed another post or two somewhere so will have a look later.

 

Jim

Share this comment


Link to comment

Hi Jim,

 

Good to see you back here! I have sorely missed your posts and seeing progress on Hemyock. It's not unusual for me to end up in your thread when Googling to see how others have solved a construction issue. The carriage- and engine sheds are some of my favourite buildings on here.

 

Thanks for the tip about cutting your own slates and the card thickness you use. I will see if I can fix the current roof and if not consider alternatives. 

Share this comment


Link to comment

Hi Mikkel

It's such a relief to see you posting again, I was afraid "Slipper boy" would be your swan song .

Just a thought about the lack of gutters on your smaller shelter, the one at Lustleigh does have a brick base, if the wooden structure sits directly on a hard floor you will get rot up the lower nine inches or so. We don't have heavy rain, just lots of little bits, so the constant drip and splashing up causes the bottom planks/ends to be damp all the time.

Either an interesting retro-fit of gutters or a different weathering opportunity.

Keep up the good work, I always admire your depth of research.

Ash.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Hi Ash, many thanks for this - very useful. I hadn't noticed the brickbase on the Lustleigh one but now that you have pointed it out I can see it in the photos.

 

I think I'll fit gutters along with a rebuild of the roof and barge boards - it will mean diverging a bit more from the prototype at Long Marston, but I do that all the time anyway! :-) 

Share this comment


Link to comment

Forgot about your blog. sorry....

 

The shed is great, but I especially like the cart. Those kind of additions to a layout really make the period the layout is set in come alive.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.