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Backdating the Oxford Rail Dean Goods (2)


Mikkel

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I thought it was about time that I finished my Dean Goods, so here it is virtually done.

 

 

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It's taken an awful long time to do, although in fairness it has been resting untouched for long periods while I worked on other projects.

 

 

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The loco has the original twin flywheel Oxford mechanism that came with the lined pre-grouping version. Mine is a very smooth runner, which is why I found the project worthwhile in the first place. Indeed I've bought another one at a sale, which also runs very well.

 

Below is a summary of the main steps since the first post on the project, with some further photos of the completed item towards the end.

 

Cab

 

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The cab floor and interior splashers were built up from styrene.

 

 

 

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A cut-out was required in order to clear the motor when fitting the body.

 

 

 

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The cab detail is a bit quick and dirty. I found a backhead in the spares box, spruced it up a bit and moved it 0.5 mms into the cab to clear the motor. It’s too low, but don’t tell anyone. The raised floor section in the right hand side of the cab can be seen on No. 2516 at Steam, but I’m not sure if it was there in the 1900s? According to Martin Finney, cab seats were a later feature so I didn’t fit any.

 

 

 

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Brassmasters have some lovely Finney fittings for the cab, but I wanted to save my pennies, so modified the Oxford lever and springs to look a bit more accurate.

 

 

 

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The cab side beading was made from 5 thou strips, cut on my Portrait and curved gently with my warm and healing fingers. Stuck down with Limonene and secured by rolling a brush handle against it.

 

 

 

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Further beading and handrails were made from wire. 

 

 

 

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The cab roof was built up with four laminated layers, here are the first two (10 + 5 thou).

 

 

 

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And the uppermost two (2 x 5 thou). 

 

 

 

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The join between cab and boiler was also built up piecemeal, very close to the spectacles as per my prototype. 

 

 

Fittings

 

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 Handrails were fitted using my well established formula: "Measure once, drill thrice !" :pardon:
 
 
 

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Boiler washout plugs from Coast Line Models. Alan appears to have temporarily withdrawn these, I hope they’ll return. 
 

 

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I fashioned a new reversing lever, and fitted a loco jack from the Broad Gauge Society.
 

 
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Photos of the uprights on which loco jacks were mounted during this period are rare, here's a crop from an image I found (left). Also a standing version, which I suspect was an earlier arrangement.
 

 
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 The curvy “piano lid” cylinder cover was a feature of some locos during the short smokebox period. They were sometimes left in open position while running! Fittings on the smokebox side were cobbled up from bits of brass. 
 
 
Chassis

 

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The loco chassis required very little modification, which means it can be easily replaced in case of a major failure. However, an indication of the ash pan and nearby components was needed. So I nicked Coachmann’s idea and made a simple screw-on unit.
 

 

 

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Later the ashpan was painted and Archer's rivets applied.

 

 

Tender

 

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The Oxford tender is generally a good representation of the 2500 gallon variant, but various mods were needed to backdate it to 1900s condition. First, the fenders were cut off using a scalpel, and the area was filed clean.
 
 

 

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The protecting plates at the rear and front were too high for my 1900s prototype, and were therefore filed down to appropriate height and shape.

 

 

 

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I left the casing for the water filler untouched. Subsequent discussions suggest that the shape may have been different during this period - but I will leave it for now.

 

 

 

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Next up were the coal rails. I first tried cutting some 10 thou Evergreen on my  Silhouette cutter. It looks OK here, but as might be expected it was just too flimsy.
 

 


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Instead I used wire from Eileen’s Emporium, halfround as per the prototype. I considered soldering but thought the joints might come undone every time I applied heat, so used epoxy. The result is quite solid. 
 

 


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 The uprights were fitted into holes just inside the flare of the tender sides, taking care not to break through the sides. I think the top rail sits a trifle high. Ah well.

 

 

 

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Photos suggest that most of the fittings at the front of the Oxford tender are not appropriate for my period.

 


 
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Replacement toolboxes and air vents from Brassmasters (ex-Finney) were fitted. Maybe the latter should be smaller on a 2500G tender, not sure. Sandboxes were cobbled together from bits of styrene.

 
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The front steps of the early 2500g tenders had an inward curve. A couple of round files solved this. The plastic protects the chassis from metal dust.
 

 

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Here is the result. 
 

 

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The finished tender (less brake gear).
 

 

 

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Loco and modified tender.

 

 

Painting and lining

 

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The loco in primer. 

 

 

 

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After recovering from an "orange peel" disaster I got the paint job done. The green is Vallejo 70.850 with a touch of black (5:1), the red is 70.814. 

 


 

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Lining was done with HMRS Pressfix transfers.

 

 

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One side done. The triple panels on the tender were tricky.


 

 

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Halfway through I ran out of lining, and discovered that new HMRS lining sheets are a different colour from the older ones.  The samples above show the old sheet, and three new sheets. The latter came directly from the HMRS, whose own illustration still shows the older shade. A Fox sheet is also featured. In the end I cobbled together the remaining lining from an old sheet, using 26 pieces for one cabside :rolleyes:. It does show in places.

 

 

Final details

 

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Cab windows were made by filing and sanding the teeth off watchmaker's cogs.

 

 

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The glazing was cut on my Silhouette cutter.

 

 

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Not perfect, but I can live with it.

 

 

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Bit of fun: The Oxford model comes with a choice of coarse or fine screw link couplings (bottom two).  I modified mine by adding a “Tommy bar” (top), fashioned from a part that I found in my box of watchmaker’s spares.

 

 

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A last few shots of the loco. Photos of 2487 and some other Dean Goods shows the safety valve slightly off-set from the center of the boiler band, so I copied that. Annoyingly I forgot to add the safety valve lever. Too late now, I can't get in there to fit it properly.

 

 

 

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The big compromise is the seam line in the boiler, although I only notice it from certain angles. I  had planned to distract from the join by carrying the lining all round, but experiments showed that it had the opposite effect, so I left it off.  Were I to do it again I would give more attention to matching the angles of the two edges as they meet, which could have been better.

 

 

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Still, I'm happy enough with it. The short smokebox and piano-lid cylinder cover makes it a bit different from available kit versions. No other comparison intended! 

 

 

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So that's about it. Loco lamps and crew are on the workbench, and I need to fit couplings bars between the buffers. I also need some work plates, the one seen here is a stand-in of unknown origin. Does anyone know a source of 4mm works plates?

 

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Splendid!  The Dean is such an attractive loco, particularly in the 1900s period - you've turned it into something pretty special.

Kit PW

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Time to return the compliment Mikkel,

 

Absolutely spiffing dear chap, well modelled and very much enjoyed the blow by blow account.

 

Whats next ? 

 

G

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Just brilliant Mikkel. 

 

I think I said once that my backdate of a Hornby(?) Dean Goods was to give it an Edwardian crew.  Still not managed to do that yet.

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Well worth all the effort, a splendid rendition of one of Mr Dean’s finest!  I’m looking forward to seeing the Armstrong Goods that you obviously should tackle next:D

 

BW

 

Dave

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9 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

Superb. I really must do some more on 2390, which sort of stuck at the proof of principle stage.

 

Thanks Stephen. I have often wondered if I should have gone for a less common variant of the class, as you are doing. It does make sense. At one point I even considered making the dome detachable! 

 

9 hours ago, kitpw said:

Splendid!  The Dean is such an attractive loco, particularly in the 1900s period - you've turned it into something pretty special.

Kit PW

 

Thank you Kit, yes I completely agree, one of the best looking work horses of the period, in my opinion. I never cease to be amazed that goods locos of the era were painted with such circumstance (even discounting the overscale lining seen here).

 

9 hours ago, bgman said:

Time to return the compliment Mikkel,

 

Absolutely spiffing dear chap, well modelled and very much enjoyed the blow by blow account.

 

Whats next ? 

 

G

 

Thanks Grahame. Next on the loco front is an 1813 class in original condition with side tanks. It's been in the pipeline for ages, waiting for this one to be finished. 

 

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9 hours ago, ChrisN said:

Just brilliant Mikkel. 

 

I think I said once that my backdate of a Hornby(?) Dean Goods was to give it an Edwardian crew.  Still not managed to do that yet.

 

Thanks Chris. As you'll know, the Airfix/Dapol/Hornby Dean Goods body still has a lot going for it. My idea for this project started with a plan to modify that into a roundtopped boiler. There's an old RMweb article on the matter, if you're interested.

 

9 hours ago, Dave John said:

A lot of work there Mikkel, but the end result looks very nice indeed. 

 

Hi Dave, thanks and yes a lot of work. Good thing I didn't realize how much at the outset! Not necessarily all that rational, but I suppose that's the joy of a hobby: It doesn't have to be :)

 

9 hours ago, wenlock said:

Well worth all the effort, a splendid rendition of one of Mr Dean’s finest!  I’m looking forward to seeing the Armstrong Goods that you obviously should tackle next:D

 

BW

 

Dave

 

Many thanks Dave. As I may have said before, many is the time when I have gazed longingly at your own Dean Goods during this process.  An Armstrong Goods would be nice, especially one of the early domeless variants. Hmmm... 

 

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8 hours ago, drduncan said:

Lovely work!

D

 

Thanks Duncan. We discussed loco lamps earlier: I have a couple ready to be fitted, but after consulting Ian it seems I need some more to make a stopping goods headcode. 

 

8 hours ago, Northroader said:

Enjoyed your step by step account, it’s looking a really lovely loco now.

 

Thank you Northroader, I'm impressed that anyone has actually read the whole account. Blog entries probably shouldn't be this long!

 

2 hours ago, Florence Locomotive Works said:

That sir, is a genuinely exceptional piece of work. 

 

Many thanks! It feels good to have it done. I don't normally painting and lining, but that stage really gave me some headaches this time.

 

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It is good to see the finished loco as I followed the progress since the start. I have also build one from this era using a Mainline body and a Comet chassis in EM. I used a piece of electrical conduit to replace the belpaire firebox and taking your lead purchased brass boiler fittings from the UK.Thank you for the paint no.s as we can't buy precision paints in Western Australia due to postal concerns and I have used your blog to gain the Vallejo numbers that you use.One day I may be brave enough to post a photo but after viewing yours there seems no need.

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3 hours ago, Mikkel said:

 

Thanks Chris. As you'll know, the Airfix/Dapol/Hornby Dean Goods body still has a lot going for it. My idea for this project started with a plan to modify that into a roundtopped boiler. There's an old RMweb article on the matter, if you're interested.

 

 

Mikkel,

Thank you, but please do not tempt me.  I actually have too many locos, but none of the right sort.  As you from my thread know quick conversions tend to become more than you expected.  As pictures of three section saddle tank 850s in 1895 gratefully received.  The version I have is tender drive so that is another issue.  On the other hand if there was a body that could easily be converted...………  (If you could give me a link, or point me in the right direction of the article I promise I will completely ignore it as I have far too much else to do..:D  )

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A superb overview of a 'build' that I have followed over some time.  I especially appreciate your detailed illustrations of how you tackled all those 'small details'.  Any model that can withstand such close photographic scrutiny has to be very good indeed. 

 

I also admire your patience in carrying this model through to such a beautiful conclusion.  I fear that my own lack of persistence has resulted in a large number of models which lack all those important details that make a great model stand out from the crowd.

 

Mike

 

 

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I feel I must write again specifically about that tender step.  It is the sort of detail that few would notice and yet, once recognised, turns a utilitarian feature into a work of art.  The way it complements the curve of the engine step to create such as interesting shape is remarkable. 

 

Do I detect a woman's eye somewhere in the Swindon drawing office:   another example of Miss Havisham's influence, perhaps?

 

Mike

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Mikkel

Posted (edited)

11 hours ago, gwr517 said:

It is good to see the finished loco as I followed the progress since the start. I have also build one from this era using a Mainline body and a Comet chassis in EM. I used a piece of electrical conduit to replace the belpaire firebox and taking your lead purchased brass boiler fittings from the UK.Thank you for the paint no.s as we can't buy precision paints in Western Australia due to postal concerns and I have used your blog to gain the Vallejo numbers that you use.One day I may be brave enough to post a photo but after viewing yours there seems no need.

 

Many thanks! I hope you will post a photo, the Comet chassis and Mainline body must be a pleasing combo. 

 

Finding the right Vallejo colours has long be a headache, but I think I'll use these again. Here is the test sheet, the 70.850 + black (5:1) looks very dark like this, which is probably why it took me so long to find it. The satin varnish does make a big difference also, adding a bit of eggshell finish (not seen here):

 

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8 hours ago, ChrisN said:

 

Mikkel,

Thank you, but please do not tempt me.  I actually have too many locos, but none of the right sort.  As you from my thread know quick conversions tend to become more than you expected.  As pictures of three section saddle tank 850s in 1895 gratefully received.  The version I have is tender drive so that is another issue.  On the other hand if there was a body that could easily be converted...………  (If you could give me a link, or point me in the right direction of the article I promise I will completely ignore it as I have far too much else to do..:D  )

 

Ha, your internal struggle with the temptation comes very clearly in that paragraph, Chris :D. I agree, the words "quick conversion" are the most dangerous in the modelling world! See PM about the article.

 

8 hours ago, MikeOxon said:

I feel I must write again specifically about that tender step.  It is the sort of detail that few would notice and yet, once recognised, turns a utilitarian feature into a work of art.  The way it complements the curve of the engine step to create such as interesting shape is remarkable. 

 

Do I detect a woman's eye somewhere in the Swindon drawing office:   another example of Miss Havisham's influence, perhaps?

 

Mike

 

Thanks for the words on the model Mike, and thanks also on behalf of Dean for those observations about the tender step.  If I remember correctly, Churchward's tender steps don't have quite the same grace. I sometimes think of Dean as the last romantic on the Great Western.  Er, I mean, Miss Havisham of course! :)

 

 

Edited by Mikkel
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Many thanks Al. Depite the setbacks along the way I enjoyed the project. Not the goal but the journey and all that.

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Thanks again for the insight into how you achieved the shade of paint you needed. It is the same as in my work as a book and paper conservator.At least we have a clue from the remaining work of art. It is difficult to judge from printed material due to the variations in that medium. I have only recently found a supplier of Vallejo so here goes.I also have to agree with the other posts. Your work is an inspiration. Roll on some thing from Armstrong etc.:)

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Just come across this,  superb workmanship and great end result. It's very interesting how many details changed between original and later condition locos. Lots of good tips there, liked the archer rivets for example.

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That is one lovely, lovely loco and I say this as a devotee of Crewe/Derby  products:D

 

Mike

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Wonderful work, Mikkel, and inspirational.

 

You said you were worried about soldering the coal rails and used epoxy instead.  I can understand your concern if you had used conventional soldering but resistance soldering would have been ideal for this type of job.

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Mikkel

Posted (edited)

13 hours ago, gwr517 said:

Thanks again for the insight into how you achieved the shade of paint you needed. It is the same as in my work as a book and paper conservator.At least we have a clue from the remaining work of art. It is difficult to judge from printed material due to the variations in that medium. I have only recently found a supplier of Vallejo so here goes.I also have to agree with the other posts. Your work is an inspiration. Roll on some thing from Armstrong etc.:)

 

Conservator, that must be a useful background to have as a modeller. Good luck with the Vallejo, it's my favourite paint as it flows so well. Strangely though I get occasional bottles where something has gone wrong: The paint is thin and glossy and no amount of mixing seems to help. I've never understood the reason.

 

10 hours ago, railroadbill said:

Just come across this,  superb workmanship and great end result. It's very interesting how many details changed between original and later condition locos. Lots of good tips there, liked the archer rivets for example.

 

Many thanks Bill. Regarding the archer's rivets, I normally add them after painting as they don't stick well directly on bare plastic or brass. However I saw a tip recently in this post: 

 

 

Edited by Mikkel
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7 hours ago, ikks said:

That is one lovely, lovely loco and I say this as a devotee of Crewe/Derby  products:D

 

Mike

 

Thanks Mike, I think a thousand LNWR and Midland men just turned in their graves! Mind you I've often been tempted by something from those stables. So many locos, so little time.

 

37 minutes ago, davidbr said:

Wonderful work, Mikkel, and inspirational.

 

You said you were worried about soldering the coal rails and used epoxy instead.  I can understand your concern if you had used conventional soldering but resistance soldering would have been ideal for this type of job.

 

Thanks David, my soldering skills are very basic so I haven't really considered resistance soldering yet. I've seen it as something more advanced, but maybe that's a misunderstanding/myth. I see Raymond Walley has a page on it here: http://www.raymondwalley.com/misc/tools/rsu.html

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