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  1. "Surely you do not intend to transport my prize-winning champion in that ?!". Mr Bull looked incredulously at Woodcourt, the Station Master of Farthing. Woodcourt was acutely aware that the situation required all his diplomatic skills. "I'm afraid this is our only option" he replied "and we do convey horses in cattle vans quite frequently. The sheeting will keep her from panicking." He decided not to mention that the only horses ever carried in cattle vans were lowly farm animals. Faced with no alternative, Mr Bull f
    12 points
  2. The Hornby/Mitchell Castle has now received its new identity and has got a little more grubby along the way!
    6 points
  3. Work continues to get the layout ready for the Nottingham show. For my own part I've finally completed work on the Hotel Royale and its neighbouring houses. As those who know the real thing may notice, I have omitted the glazed 'sun deck' over the entrance that existed in the 1960s and 70s and backdated the building to its original form. Due to lack of photos, I have had to speculate a little on how the entrance might have looked before this was added. In particular I have assumed that the big beam that is present today was added to hold up the 'sun deck' and was not part of the origi
    5 points
  4. This Blog entry is about making good a Bachmann Manor. It could equally well apply to an older Bachmann Hall and I dare say might also apply to Dapol / Hornby Counties, not to mention Granges and the new 28xx. This view above is my version of the Cambrian Coast Express. I have fond memories of the ex GWR Manor Class engines and Dovey Junction. As mentioned elsewhere on this web site 'Dad and I' had a little look round Aberystwyth Shed in the very early 1960s and couldn't fail to be impressed by all the spotless polished brass and deep green paintwork. Needless to say I have had to
    3 points
  5. Greetings. Just a few extra details added this evening, before quitting to watch Whitechapel. This is a very detailed kit - far too so for me, personally, as it requires soldering under magnification of some very fiddly detail. My eyes are just not that good anymore! The etches though are astonishing in terms of quality. I found the tiny (.3mm) holes in the chassis for the brake wire too close to the driving wheels. When I tried slotting a piece through it actually rotated with the wheel. I have therefore taken liberties with the brakes,omitting and bypassing the centre shoe, and s
    3 points
  6. It's been a while between blog entries this month, mostly because I've spent an inordinate amount of time sleeping when at home. The traveling is finally starting to get to me! But I cannot complain because I like my job and it pays well for the time I put in. However with the tiredness, comes mistakes, and for anyone who has a copy of RCTS volume 2A, you'll spot the mistake which creeped into my modelling this month in about three paragraphs time. I choose to relate it here, because in a noble sense, hopefully it will stop others from making the same mistake - and in a less noble sense, i
    2 points
  7. A doubleheaded down Paddington-Penzance express with a Hall, King and 14 on!
    2 points
  8. One of the reasons I chose to model Farthing was the rather unusual combination of stock sometimes seen in that area . In this case, East meets West as the thoroughly Cornish 0-4-4T No. 34 heads a train of Holden 4-wheelers from the Metropolitan area. A highly implausible combination, especially during this period and in this location! Above, Driver T. F. Oberon eases the branch train into the bay, while Fireman R.S. Peaseblossom is looking desperately for his lunch bag. The branch train comes to rest in the bay. It is seen from the alternate, non-viewing side o
    1 point
  9. Farthing, June 27, 1914. Europe is on the brink of war, but noone knows. The staff go about their morning routines, and No. 835 sleepily shunts a horsebox. Station Master A. Woodcourt examines the scene. He likes the order and calm of the bay area. He is feeling his age and hopes it will be a quiet day. But it is not to be. As he propels the horsebox into the sidings, driver T.F. Oberon notices a problem. Throughout his life with the railways, he has been able to smell a hot axlebox. And he can smell one now.
    1 point
  10. I finished the second row of Howard Scenics cottage fronts the other day, and finally took some photos out doors today while the sun was out (well, mostly): Here is what they look like from the back, posed on the layout:
    1 point
  11. Some progress has been made on the “Brush 4â€, to the extent that I think the “body†is now done. The main area of focus has been around the front ends, in a bid to try and make the model look a bit more like the prototype. As I’m sure I mentioned before I’d acquired some Extreme Etchings Class 47 windscreen surround etches... and very nice these are too. So I wanted to use these and soon realised that these would be quite a bit bigger than the Bachmann openings so an improved look could result. I also wanted to replace the handrail, having already removed the “thick†plastic han
    1 point
  12. Update - Its been a bit of a frustrating 10 days or so for me... Last week our two boys were away on holidays so I took the opportunity to work on their 4mm roundy roundy. I made quite a bit of progress although when they returned this weekend it wasn't long before the screaming, shouting, arguing and fighting started and I nearly went a threw the whole lot on the floor in frustration So, rather than work on finishing the station building and weathering it, I decided to work a little on the motive power for Kyle. Aside from a large logo tractor, the first two locos will be 24113 and 2
    1 point
  13. Thank you kindly Will. I have just finished the stripping of 60034 for conversion to 60028 and it's well on its way to being a single chimney A4 all over again...! New nameplates ordered, the Lord Faringdon plates I have managed to salvage along with the numberplate for future use. No harm done, bar a few nights work, but I thought it might amuse or strike a chord with anyone else who has had that "facepalm" moment when you realize you've made a schoolboy error!
    1 point
  14. As he walked back to his office, Woodcourt looked back at the wagon, lifted his cap and scratched his head. He walked on shaking his head and thinking "What xxx stencilled the date on that wagon sheet? He obviously couldn't tell the difference between thirteen and thirty!" Good stuff, Mikkel. Looking forward to the next episode. Nick
    1 point
  15. It's a credit to your honesty that you owned up! I wonder how many people would've known LF never ran in that condition? I certainly didn't! PS. I do like the last pic - very 'LNER publicity department'
    1 point
  16. One small comment, Ilkeston Town is the work of Nottingham MRS, Ilkeston Woodside club had part of their Kimberley layout on show
    1 point
  17. Well if that 26 is the result of the eyesight and patience I think you're not doing too bad at all. As others have said I'm like the way your blog details the highs and lows, it inspires us all who have similar lows!! And I've threatened to throw my lads Brio in the bin on more than one occasion and he's only 18months! What have you used for the front end detail on your 26 and 24? Also do you have any pics of the 24? Might help inspire me to carry on with my 25 conversion - having a crisis of nerve!
    1 point
  18. Thanks for all your kind comments. From looking at photographs, I think the corner framework is square section timber so on the finished model they should look the same thickness when viewed from either the side or the end. Therefore if the sides go between the ends, the framework on the sides should be thinner than that on the ends by the thickness of a layer of etch. Now that the kit is assembled its hard to measure but looking at my first photo on this blog entry, if anything the ends look thinner which would suggest the ends go between the sides. I've just measured the finished mo
    1 point
  19. Cracking shot Pete, put a smile on my face!
    1 point
  20. Loving the headlights, cold looking layout, cool looking locomotive.
    1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. have to agree with Kris its the wrong colour I thought I had cornered the market in low points Drink Gin it a be fine
    1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. Thanks for the comments. Pete, I was wondering whether you knew the location of those Brazilian survivors but, of course, it is a rather big country. Mikkel, I'm not sure I'd like to meet such a bug, it would probably be as big as the model. Yes, the diorama idea was just a passing fancy as I've every intention of getting it to run soon. Having looked at the photos and videos of this work on the Joyce restoration pages, I noticed that the lifting was done with most of the fiddly bits removed from the boiler, so they may well have done the same with overhauls in the past. Sallydog, Adam, I'v
    1 point
  25. Apart from two pieces on 15 refuges (waiting for timber delivery) the refuges are now all done. Here are all 72 of them lined up, with the incomplete ones at the back. They still need trimming and fitting in places. With each refuge having 19 pieces, when the last 15 are done there will be 1368 pieces in the photo above! Balustrades are also all done, and here they all are, 70 'standard' ones and 8 'specials' which are a bit longer for the runs between the pavilions and the inner pavilion and first refuge. The standard balustrades have 7 pieces each, while 6 of the specials hav
    1 point
  26. It does make a huge difference to some already outstanding models
    1 point
  27. Crickey, this is a nice bit of model making - another thread I've missed until now.
    1 point
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