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  1. Tony, With all due respect ..... expecially as you're demonstrating, applying the (waterslide) transfers should be done so as to avoid the "halo" around them - so many people have an aversion to waterslide transfers because they don't know the correct way to do it and hate the "halo". First - acquire some quick-drying acrylic GLOSS varnish - I use the old fashioned Johnson's Klear floor lacquer, but I'm assured that the latest iteration of the product is just as effective; see https://www.amazon.co.uk/Pledge-Klear-Multi-Surface-Wax/dp/B008HFVO32 Apply the lacquer to the areas that are to have transfers applied - it dries in minutes. Apply the transfers in the normal way, and let them dry. Apply another coat of the lacquer over the transfers to seal them. If at any point the lacquer goes milky, panic not ! ....it will dry clear. Weather away to your heart's content - I start with a waft of Testors Dullcote. There really is no avoiding the gloss finish BEFORE applying transfers if you want to avoid the "halo" - and weathering doesn't completely hide it once it's there. You wouldn't short-cut the valvegear on one of your big LNER Pacifics - putting on transfers deserves the same attention. Regards, John Isherwood.
  2. I presume, therefore, that there must have been a hatch in the van floor into which scrap could be dropped whilst the van stood on the weighbridge. A bit like an old fashioned confectioner weighing out sweets - keep (reluctantly) dropping the sweets in to the scales pan until it just twiched! Regards, John Isherwood.
  3. Wire wound guitar string with a slice of plastic rod on the end. That's what I've used in the past. Regards, John Isherwood.
  4. Very true - but difficult to build a vehicle exactly to designed weight. Regards, John Isherwood.
  5. That's an Hseng too - just the single cylinder version. Do a Google search on Hseng AS196 - they're available from loads of outlets, and under different branding too; but Hseng are the manufacturers. The feature that I like on mine is the two position switch. One option has a pressure switch that keeps the tank pressure between 3 and 4 BAR; the other gives variable pressure via the manual pressure valve up to 6 BAR. Regards, John Isherwood.
  6. https://haoshengnb.en.made-in-china.com/product/dskERZSTCQVY/China-Hseng-Portable-Mini-Airbrush-Compressor-As196.html I doubt that I'll ever have to replace it - but, if I had to, it'd be another one exactly the same. I bought it for a ridiculously cheap price - which included a free, very well made, airbrush !! Regards, John Isherwood.
  7. Clive, Spot on - that, in effect, is what I was saying. Regards, John Isherwood.
  8. With respect Tony - the Hornby model is entirely correct. Under BR, wheelbase markings were prefixed 'WB' and had the foot ' / inches '' symbols; tare weight were not prefixed. Still, you have acknowledged that wagons are not your 'thing'. Regards, John Isherwood.
  9. Me too - does everything I want and more. Regards, John Isherwood.
  10. Sorry about the link - when I posted it it went to https://www.google.com/search?q=devilbiss+autograph+63+instructions&client=firefox-b-d&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=48jAqnRbAhpUIM%3A%2CE_0BORZYsKO1PM%2C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kSZSFRHgT4nd1bMQH3xBuh5N8JdwQ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjBv_W2q9PnAhXXShUIHWY0DKgQ9QEwA3oECAoQBQ#imgrc=48jAqnRbAhpUIM: ; presumably it's been sold. To be honest, I only have a vague recollection of the detailed construction of the 63 airbrush - if you can post an exploded diagram I should be able to remeber better and perhaps answer you question. Regards, John Isherwood.
  11. Sorry about the link - when I posted it it went to https://www.google.com/search?q=devilbiss+autograph+63+instructions&client=firefox-b-d&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=48jAqnRbAhpUIM%3A%2CE_0BORZYsKO1PM%2C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kSZSFRHgT4nd1bMQH3xBuh5N8JdwQ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjBv_W2q9PnAhXXShUIHWY0DKgQ9QEwA3oECAoQBQ#imgrc=48jAqnRbAhpUIM: ; presumably it's been sold. To be honest, I only have a vague recollection of the detailed construction of the 63 airbrush - if you can post an exploded diagram I should be able to remeber better and perhaps answer you question. Regards, John Isherwood.
  12. If I may - a tiny suggestion. The chimney would benefit from losing that moulding joint. Sorry to be picky. Regards, John Isherwood.
  13. The cam ring, as I recall, sets a variable limit to the amount your can pull back the needle. This prevents you accidently increasing the paint flow to an excessive extent. It's literally decades since I used an airbrush of this type, and my aging memory is somewhat sketchy. There is one of these airbrushes for sale on Ebay at present, complete with instructions; https://www.ebay.co.uk/c/1623268682; ; if you lack the instructions, the seller may well be prepared to sell you a copy of them. Enquiries here http://www.getpainted.com/vintageairbrushes.html may also be productive. Regards, John Isherwood.
  14. I'd agree - this was my first airbrush and it's a quality item. Get some airbrush 'reamer'; soak the individual components; replace any sealing rings / gaskets; and check the needle under a magnifying glass to ensure it hasn't got any kinks / bends; (which can often be removed by rolling the point on a hard surface with your finger). Re-assemple the airbrush with the needle clamping nut slackened off; gently push the needle full forard into the nozzle; pull back the needle trigger the tiniest amount and then tighten the needle clamp collar. This should ensure that the needle is fully closing the nozzle when the trigger is released. (Incidently, there should be a clamping washer on the needle just before the clamp collar; this comprises a short length of brass tube with angled cut ends. The angled cuts cause the tube to skew and lock onto the needle). Press the trigger to start the airflow, then slowly pull back the trigger to commence paint flow. When finishing a paint pass, let the trigger move fully forward to stop the paint flow before releasing pressure on the trigger to stop the airflow - this should blow through any remaining paint. At the end of a session, or after a long pause / paint change, ALWAYS blow through some thinners appropriate to the type of paint being used. Regards, John Isherwood.
  15. Let's be fair - it's £24 for 21 containers - not 1. You may only have one container, but there are lots of different types and regions on my transfers sheets - because modellers always seem to want something different from the last one! Use the set you need, and sell the rest here or on Ebay. Regards, John Isherwood, Cambridge Custom Transfers.
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