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Container flats in the 1990s


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Don't know if anyone in the group can answer this.

 

I vaguely remember reading the railway press about a short-term spot freight fow carrying contaminated ship's ballast from Falmouth some time in the mid-1990s, using "Bin Liner" style containers. So far internet searches have come up with nothing.

 

Can anyone remember this, and know anything about the wagons or containers used?

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I can't remember now if these wagons seen at St Blazey on 24Jun97 were being used. They may well have been for another short term flow.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/irishswissernie/6834838715/in/album-72157629212802745/

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/irishswissernie/6834925965/in/album-72157629212802745/

 

Ernie

Edited by Irishswissernie
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Don't know if anyone in the group can answer this.

 

I vaguely remember reading the railway press about a short-term spot freight fow carrying contaminated ship's ballast from Falmouth some time in the mid-1990s, using "Bin Liner" style containers. So far internet searches have come up with nothing.

 

Can anyone remember this, and know anything about the wagons or containers used?

Was it ship's ballast, or contaminated material from shot-blasting ship hulls during ship repairs and painting?

 

cheers

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Can anyone remember any more about the flow? In particular, where were the wagons loaded?  And did they run as a short block working or as part of the scheduled "Enterprise" working east of St Blazey?

Was it Falmouth Docks? Certainly that was where the material came from.

There was mention of a traffic in sand (not the china-clay waste) from Falmouth. IIRC, this was from a ship that had to put in there for urgent repairs, the traffic being taken by road to Truro, and transferred to rail there. In this case MEAs were used.

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  • RMweb Gold

As far as I can recall, the traffic was amongst the last, or actually the last to come out of Falmouth Docks, before NR unilaterally severed the connection to make track renewals and maintenance easier for them a couple of years ago.

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Huw Phillips is the man who would know....anyone (CK?) have a contact?

Maybe I should explain for those who won't know who Huw is, he was the BR railfreight manager based at St Blazey at the time. He worked hard to develop business, and I guess was behind the subject matter of this post.

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The container wagons in the links above were indeed used on Toxic 'shot-blast' material loaded at Falmouth Docks. I remember 37671 taking a train load through Plymouth. Destination was Northenden. This flow also used MEA wagons in later years, loaded at Falmouth Docks in addition to the already mentioned MEA loading at Truro with ferrous sulphate.

Edited by nat37670
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  • 5 weeks later...

post-9183-0-94901300-1484077544_thumb.jpg

 

The stuff at Truro was actually cargo from a ship that ran into difficulty. Quote from elsewhere on the net:

'The cargo is bagged ferrous sulphate which had been removed from the ship 'MV Newcastle' at Falmouth Docks. The ships cargo which originated from Spain and can be used to make fertiliser and iron tablets, got wet when the ship ran into difficulty and was in danger of turning into toxic and corrosive sulphuric acid. Workers at Falmouth Docks had to pump out the sea water and take the cargo ashore after the Maritime Coastguard Agency stopped it travelling any further by sea. 6,000 tonnes were moved by rail from Truro Yard to Grimsby.'

 

From the picture you can see the bagged cargo being lifted into MEA wagons which were lined with protective sheeting.

 

I do recall a wagon having to be removed from one of the trains at Tavistock Jn and being classed as a dangerous goods incident.

 

 

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