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20 hours ago, Mikkel said:

Yes, very un-PC. A lifeperson, obviously.

Still un-PC: what we need is a lifeperchild.

 

But my earlier post was about the need for a lifeperchild at the station.  Maybe if someone has fallen into the cess pool ...

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12 hours ago, KNP said:

Then I tried the same picture but with the wagon alongside the shed.

 

3078.jpg.08a43eb429473522025544520b2fa8f1.jpg

 

Nice touch with the rust stains on the inside.

 

Adrian

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Had the same problem as mentioned by Andrew P, tried upload a picture only to say it could not be saved.

 

Try later.

 

 

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I have followed this topic from the first post. I would like to make an observation. Not a criticism, I have no grounds to criticise. But sometimes I look at one of your pictures and I am there, in the station, in the farmyard, on the dockside. And then I look at another one , and it's a model railway. I have tried to analyse the difference, and I have come to the conclusion it's the camera angle. Low level pictures look real, high levels makes it a model. I guess it's because we see real scenes from ground level, and invariably we see models from a high angle, looking down. And the mind associates those angles with those scenarios. I defy anyone to look at the goods shed pictures above and definitively state if they are real or model. That's not to say that I don't love the high level shots, they are invaluable for ideas and technique, but to my mind the low level ones are the best. Keep up the good work.

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I have to agree with you there, the ground level pictures could have been taken 90 years ago. The birds eye views show the whole scene and help tie all of those images together and give each a sense of place in the landscape. I remember when I was still at school and all of the monthly magazines had just started to introduce the detail pictures, rather than the Google earth photos that were the norm. That is when I got into the idea of building actual model railways rather than adding buildings to a train set.

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Posted (edited)

Eye level pictures are my favourite and my default way of taking pictures.

They are the way we normally see things for real.

They are difficult as you need the the lens at eye level which up until I got my compact camera was near on impossible to say the least for my Nikon DLSR.

With the advent of remote control via the eye phone the whole process got easier.

I say easier but you still have to place the camera in and amongst the scenery with all the inherent risks that entails and there has been many a repair done afterwards to trees, shrubs, point rodding, and other items that got flattened.

But, for you, the intrepid reader we Percy Vere (sounds like one my names for a figure!!!) and push on regardless of effort and sacrifice needed to obtain that picture that otherwise might not have been taken had the challenges had been thought about beforehand..... 

 

  

Edited by KNP
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15 hours ago, Mick Bonwick said:

 

 

I find that picture guilty.

 

Guilty of excellence.

 

Thanks but the loading gauge is now starting to grate as it got bent when earlier the loco past under it and took it for a ride.......

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On 30/08/2020 at 08:08, KNP said:

Eye level pictures are my favourite and my default way of taking pictures.

They are the way we normally see things for real.

They are difficult as you need the the lens at eye level which up until I got my compact camera was near on impossible to say the least for my Nikon DLSR.

With the advent of remote control via the eye phone the whole process got easier.

I say easier but you still have to place the camera in and amongst the scenery with all the inherent risks that entails and there has been many a repair done afterwards to trees, shrubs, point rodding, and other items that got flattened.

But, for you, the intrepid reader we Percy Vere (sounds like one my names for a figure!!!) and push on regardless of effort and sacrifice needed to obtain that picture that otherwise might not have been taken had the challenges had been thought about beforehand..... 

 

  

 

I vaguely remember a cartoon character in a newspaper(?) called Percy Vere towards the end of WW2 Intended to encourage / keep the workers producing the munitions etc. All good propaganda!. (not done a search to verify my recollections)

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3 hours ago, KNP said:

Whilst back down on the farm all appears quite

There I am, in the distance, still leaning on that fence....

 

3083.jpg.e00e14671ad940a9151dbd43d9157ad5.jpg

Im sure if you look at this scene long enough you will see a couple of hens pottering across the yard!

 

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The camera is sitting in front of the pig sty with the lens pointing down the lane.

Macro needed as the nearest buildings distance was 35mm ish.

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1 minute ago, KNP said:

The camera is sitting in front of the pig sty with the lens pointing down the lane.

Macro needed as the nearest buildings distance was 35mm ish.

You have certainly mastered the DoF.

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