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Andy Y

Minerva announce O Gauge Iron Mink van

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I collected a flurry of MInks today - what the GWR referred to as "iron covered wagon".  Very nice models at an extremely nice price.

 

OK, I am going to have to change the wheels as I use the S7 standards..  and replace the buffer stocks with a version which is tapered like the prototype...  and prise the door moulding off of the body so as to replace with a new frame to improve the look of the doors relative to the stanchions.

 

Then there is the question of the livery, I can live with all of my models being 25" G and W, what needs to be changed is the running number.  Hint to those who are thinking of buying examples:- Minerva has four running numbers in each of the different liveries.

 

regards, Graham

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I collected a flurry of MInks today - what the GWR referred to as "iron covered wagon".  Very nice models at an extremely nice price.

 

OK, I am going to have to change the wheels as I use the S7 standards..  and replace the buffer stocks with a version which is tapered like the prototype...  and prise the door moulding off of the body so as to replace with a new frame to improve the look of the doors relative to the stanchions.

 

Then there is the question of the livery, I can live with all of my models being 25" G and W, what needs to be changed is the running number.  Hint to those who are thinking of buying examples:- Minerva has four running numbers in each of the different liveries.

 

regards, Graham

 

There is photographic evidence for cast number plates with 25" G W for vans built to later Lots. How about some red survivors - good for up to 1910-ish?

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There is photographic evidence for cast number plates with 25" G W for vans built to later Lots. How about some red survivors - good for up to 1910-ish?

We would have to do a run of at least 200. Is there sufficient potential demand? Send some good illustrations of what you want and we'll discuss it.

 

CK

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We would have to do a run of at least 200. Is there sufficient potential demand? Send some good illustrations of what you want and we'll discuss it.

 

CK

 

Not for me personally - I'm at 4mm scale. There is a photo example of an Iron Mink with cast numberplates and 25" G W in Atkins et al., GWR Goods Wagons (3rd edition) Plate 492, p. 369. I've no idea how big the pre-Great War market is in O gauge but I imagine as at 4mm scale, the vast majority of GWR modellers go for the 1930s or post-nationalisation.

 

My comment was more of a suggestion to Western Star (who I have the impression may be a pre-grouping modeller) that cast plates might add variety when renumbering vans in the 25" G W livery. For the pre-Great War period, grease axleboxes are another variant giving greater variety.

Edited by Compound2632

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As I commented on the lack of a red one when they were first announced, and how it's the only way I'd be tempted, I suppose you'd need to find another 199 sales! I'm not really into spending £40+ on wagons, and I'm not sure how often one would have turned up on the Kent & East Sussex, which is my O gauge interest, but as my main interest is 19th century and early 1900s GWR it would be very appealing.

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My pair arrived the other day, lovely, very pleased with them...............

 

 

 

 

post-14906-0-74586400-1510512283_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Jinty ;)

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Very nice Mick. How did you do it? 

 

Thank you, Chris.

 

The highlighting of detail (rivets, hinges, strapping) was done using a dark coloured enamel wash. When that had dried a tiny amount of paler brown pigment was added to create the beginnings of shadows. A layer of matt lacquer was then sprayed over this to seal it in place. The roof was given an all-over coat of the same colour wash and then grey-black pigment added before it dried. Once again, a layer of matt lacquer was applied to seal it.

 

The underframe was airbrushed with a predominantly earthy brown/black mixture and then more black added to the mix to introduce tonal variation. The axle boxes were given a small amount of old grease coloured pigment and the brake blocks were treated to a purply-brown pigment. A very fine mist of thinned enamel paint was then applied to the body, with a slightly heavier application in some places to achieve the variation in tone you see in the photograph.

 

I had no colour photograph to work from, so had to estimate colours using black and white photographs and the various shades of grey that they show. If somebody can produce a colour photograph of one of these vehicles then I can make some changes.

 

It occurs to me that a step by step description could be produced and placed in the weathering thread on this forum if people think it would be useful. That's providing it doesn't turn into a 'me too' thread where every RMweb weatherer tells us how they do it and with far cheaper materials.  :no2: 

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Thank you, Chris.

 

The highlighting of detail (rivets, hinges, strapping) was done using a dark coloured enamel wash. When that had dried a tiny amount of paler brown pigment was added to create the beginnings of shadows. A layer of matt lacquer was then sprayed over this to seal it in place. The roof was given an all-over coat of the same colour wash and then grey-black pigment added before it dried. Once again, a layer of matt lacquer was applied to seal it.

 

The underframe was airbrushed with a predominantly earthy brown/black mixture and then more black added to the mix to introduce tonal variation. The axle boxes were given a small amount of old grease coloured pigment and the brake blocks were treated to a purply-brown pigment. A very fine mist of thinned enamel paint was then applied to the body, with a slightly heavier application in some places to achieve the variation in tone you see in the photograph.

 

I had no colour photograph to work from, so had to estimate colours using black and white photographs and the various shades of grey that they show. If somebody can produce a colour photograph of one of these vehicles then I can make some changes.

 

It occurs to me that a step by step description could be produced and placed in the weathering thread on this forum if people think it would be useful. That's providing it doesn't turn into a 'me too' thread where every RMweb weatherer tells us how they do it and with far cheaper materials.  :no2:

Thanks Mick. I have been searching high and low for a colour photo of an Iron Mink in BR revenue service. I suspect they will display some signs of corrosion in places where the paint has been scraped away or chipped, but yours is a great job.

 

Regards,

 

Chris

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Mine arrived yesterday morning – good service Minerva. It's in the 25in lettering style and carries the number 11300 which makes it one of the later batches, either Lot 310 or 352, both built in 1901. It has the long vents introduced in 1899 and of course oil axleboxes. Did any of these have the cast-plate style of livery, or had the GWR reverted to painted letters by then?

 

The down side is that the model cannot be backdated to my 1895 operating period. The up side is that means I don't have to repaint it! I can just stash it away for when I need to create stock suitable for a c1908 period.

 

The other problem is how to convert it to Scale7. The floor has vestigial half-height representations of the underframe parts of which may have to be milled away to make room for the sprung W-irons. It will also need extra weight which might cause problems for the soft drawbar springs. Meanwhile it can go back into its box...

 

At least the brakes are right, though it does need the pilar support adding behind the V-hanger. Overall, it's a nice model.

Edited by wagonman

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I think a 1901 built one would have had plates, and may well have been painted red. It would probably be OK as it is for my 1905 period, and if I was modelling the GWR in 7mm I might be tempted. Fortunately I'm modelling the Kent & East Sussex, and already have a few GWR opens that will be visiting. I can't add anything else from that far west, especially when I've got nearly enough wagons to operate the layout, but nothing local yet.

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I think a 1901 built one would have had plates, and may well have been painted red. It would probably be OK as it is for my 1905 period, and if I was modelling the GWR in 7mm I might be tempted. Fortunately I'm modelling the Kent & East Sussex, and already have a few GWR opens that will be visiting. I can't add anything else from that far west, especially when I've got nearly enough wagons to operate the layout, but nothing local yet.

 

Col Stevens would buy almost anything if the price was right.

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Col Stevens would buy almost anything if the price was right.

The GWR weren't selling such new wagons at the time, but he did buy a nice, but rather life expired, outside framed, timber solebar, brake van from them for the K&ESR!

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One of my Minks, weathered.

As Chris has said, colour photos are not readily available, so I've had to go with a 'best guess' attitude and accepted there would be some corrosion showing in the late 50's.

Chris & Chris have produced an excellent wagon here, and available so close after announcement too. Top marks ;)

 

 

post-14906-0-16353100-1515952489_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-14906-0-47933100-1515952498_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

Jinty ;)

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Thanks Mick. I have been searching high and low for a colour photo of an Iron Mink in BR revenue service. I suspect they will display some signs of corrosion in places where the paint has been scraped away or chipped, but yours is a great job.

 

Regards,

 

Chris

Hi Chris, I've been trying to find a link to the iron Mink on the Website, i.e. Price, Spec's etc.

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The GWR weren't selling such new wagons at the time, but he did buy a nice, but rather life expired, outside framed, timber solebar, brake van from them for the K&ESR!

 

Yeah, but no, but yeah, but no ...

 

... just found a picture in one of my books of a LSWR Iron Mink which was part of a batch built by a contractor to a GWR diagram.  They later passed into SR hands.  Would there be enough demand for a run though?

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One of my Minks, weathered.

As Chris has said, colour photos are not readily available, so I've had to go with a 'best guess' attitude and accepted there would be some corrosion showing in the late 50's.

Chris & Chris have produced an excellent wagon here, and available so close after announcement too. Top marks ;)

 

 

attachicon.gifTally 272.jpg

 

 

attachicon.gifTally 273.jpg

 

 

 

Jinty ;)

Those look lovely, excellent weathering job you've done on them, too.

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I have at long last got around to weathering a Minerva Iron Mink. Enamel paint applied with a brush and finished with a smidgeon of weathering powders.

post-13142-0-99285000-1517596744_thumb.jpg

post-13142-0-30600400-1517596764_thumb.jpg

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I have just finished weathering a brace of Minerva Iron Minks for a customer. 

post-13142-0-07753400-1520358782_thumb.jpg

post-13142-0-99808200-1520358825_thumb.jpg

post-13142-0-39372900-1520358840_thumb.jpg

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