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Alister_G

Ladmanlow Sidings

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Love the cottages, looking very much like a slice of Derbyshire.

 

Inspiring me to put some track down and get a bit of modelling done.

 

Cheers,

 

Keith

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I didn't realise my plank was Ladmanlow Sidings, albeit with an extra siding top right, just goes to show there's nothing new in the world!

 

Mike.

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Thanks Keith.

 

Hi Mike, I think it's quite a common shunting puzzle arrangement, I've seen quite a few similar, which is why I settled on that design, it provides plenty of moves.

 

The extra siding adds to that of course.

 

Nice to hear from you,

 

Al.

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This Yesterday morning, I decided to add some crew to my loco fleet.

 

Some time ago I bought some of the Modelu laser scanned and 3D printed figures, and here's how they arrive.

 

post-17302-0-72971300-1544315287_thumb.jpg

 

So I stuck them in my specially acquired, immensly expensive spray booth (a cardboard box):

 

post-17302-0-30378400-1544315288_thumb.jpg

 

and gave them a blast of Matt Black from an aerosol as an undercoat:

 

post-17302-0-81490100-1544315288_thumb.jpg

 

post-17302-0-30172700-1544315289_thumb.jpg

 

post-17302-0-83764300-1544315289_thumb.jpg

 

Then, after a lot of painting, they turned out like this:

 

post-17302-0-32609000-1544315290_thumb.jpg

 

post-17302-0-11369400-1544315291_thumb.jpg

 

I took two more and gave them the same treatment:

 

post-17302-0-79204100-1544315291_thumb.jpg

 

I painted them as well, however the paint I used for these two didn't seem to like the base coat, and they were not as successful, but they'll do at a distance:

 

post-17302-0-29271700-1544315292_thumb.jpg

 

post-17302-0-76246200-1544315292_thumb.jpg

 

Anyway, here's a few photos of the crews in the locos:

 

post-17302-0-22065900-1544315587_thumb.jpg

 

post-17302-0-94615900-1544315587_thumb.jpg

 

post-17302-0-48349700-1544315588_thumb.jpg

 

post-17302-0-01589100-1544315589_thumb.jpg

 

More in a minute.

 

Al.

Edited by Alister_G
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So here's a question for you all to ponder:

 

Should I just add grass and fields at the back of the layout, probably with a hill rising up on the back left, or should I make it a set of quarry sidings, like for instance Longcliffe or Minninglow was, and have a quarry face at the back left, instead.

 

If I do the first, there needs to be a reason for the yard to be just stuck in the middle of the countryside, and I'm not sure what that would be?

 

If I do the second, I don't want to overpower the rest of the layout and detract from the open countryside setting which is quintessentially the look of the C&HPR.

 

Hmm, more thought needed.

 

I've plenty to do before I get to the stage of worrying about that, anyway.

 

Al.

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One of the reasons sidings were where they were on the C&HPR was to facilitate splitting/rejoining trains which were too big/heavy to go up the next bit of line, there doesn't necessarily have to be a raison d'etre for them.

 

Mike.

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Loving the pics so far mate, excellent stock as well.

 

I liked the cottages, but more sidings would give more operation long term and stop it from stagnating, however, as is often said in these pages, Less is More.

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I use Halfords primers, so far without any adverse effects with other manufacturers paints.

 

Go for less is more.

 

Gordon A

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First bit of video, just to prove the layout works! :)

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Al

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Hi Al, the layout is coming along a treat, I like the idea of a quarry plenty of modelling oppurtunities. All the best Adrian

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I think the real Ladmanlow Sidings worked as a small goods yard and exchange sidings for the branch to Grin Quarry.

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I think the real Ladmanlow Sidings worked as a small goods yard and exchange sidings for the branch to Grin Quarry.

 

 

 

Brilliant. Thanks both of you, that's very clear, and gives good justification for the yard.

 

This won't be an attempt in anyway to model the prototype, but it's good to get the history of the real thing.

 

Thanks,

 

Al.

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This evening, a quick experiment regarding the ground cover.

 

If you look at photos of the yards around the C&HPR you can see that they don't have visibly ballasted rail, instead there is a compacted ash surface up to the top of  - and even above - the sleeper tops:

 

post-17302-0-27551800-1544387510_thumb.jpg

Copyright John Evans used with permission

 

When I started my Cromford Wharf layout, I tried to replicate this with DAS clay:

 

post-17302-0-13602900-1544387659_thumb.jpg

 

Which whilst  partially successful, was quite messy, and needed a lot of remedial work afterwards to clear the clay from the rail sides.

 

So thinking about this, i decided to try a different approach.

 

I had a sheet of 10thou styrene which had been sprayed in Humbrol Matt Black, which I used for the windows of the Grindleford Cafe.

 

So I took the sheet and cut it into strips, to fit between the rails.

 

Here's what it looks like:

 

post-17302-0-94403000-1544387510_thumb.jpg

 

post-17302-0-52440400-1544387511_thumb.jpg

 

post-17302-0-47815000-1544387512_thumb.jpg

 

Obviously, it's too black and plain at the moment, but some weathering and static grass will soon tone that down.

 

My plan is to present the yard as quite overgrown in any case, as most of the C&HPR was by the 60s so I'm not looking for a pristine finish.

 

The advantage of the styrene sheet method is that I can cut it precisely around point blades etc, and it can be made removable - if I use some 40thou styrene underneath between the sleepers, it will  be rigid enough just to lay in place, and the gaps can be staggered to fix strips seamlessly together.

 

Yep, I think this is the way I will go.

 

Thanks for looking.

 

Al.

 

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This all looks splendid, Al.

 

 

I shall look forward to the updates as and when. I would have no issue with the middle of the fields thing. Few buildings and lack of height will add to the open feeling of it all.

 

 

Rob.

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https://www.screwfix.com/p/no-nonsense-lightweight-filler-white-1ltr/88504

 

I've used the Spanish equivalent of this on my plank, goes on easily without a lot of mess or working in, and can be easily cut afterwards with a craft knife.

For the between the tracks bit I run a spare bogie up and down the track and this makes the required clearance inside the rails, and can be easily adjusted and trimmed afterwards if need be.

 

Mike.

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This all looks splendid, Al.

 

 

I shall look forward to the updates as and when. I would have no issue with the middle of the fields thing. Few buildings and lack of height will add to the open feeling of it all.

 

 

Rob.

 

 

Thanks very much Rob. The simplicity of Sheep Lane impressed me very much, and I would like to try and get that same feel.

 

Cheers,

 

Al.

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https://www.screwfix.com/p/no-nonsense-lightweight-filler-white-1ltr/88504

 

I've used the Spanish equivalent of this on my plank, goes on easily without a lot of mess or working in, and can be easily cut afterwards with a craft knife.

For the between the tracks bit I run a spare bogie up and down the track and this makes the required clearance inside the rails, and can be easily adjusted and trimmed afterwards if need be.

 

Mike.

 

 

Thanks Mike,

 

I've used a similar plain filler before, and it is quite amenable to hacking about once dry.

 

I'm interested to try the styrene approach, just to see how it works though - I may well give it up and go back to filler or clay.

 

Al.

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I had a sheet of 10thou styrene which had been sprayed in Humbrol Matt Black...

 

...Obviously, it's too black and plain at the moment, but some weathering and static grass will soon tone that down.

 

 

Could you make up a mix of greys and black plus talcum powder and try stippling onto the styrene sheet to replicate the ash texture? Edited by Tortuga

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Could you make up a mix of greys and black plus talcum powder and try stippling onto the styrene sheet to replicate the ash texture?

 

I was thinking of trying some real ash, sieved and crushed a bit.

 

Al.

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I was thinking of trying some real ash, sieved and crushed a bit.

 

Al.

 

A bit like this...

 

post-17302-0-00945900-1544483461_thumb.jpg

 

post-17302-0-81242600-1544483461_thumb.jpg

 

post-17302-0-44422000-1544483462_thumb.jpg

 

Al.

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Unfortunately IMHO the curving of the base card an that the ash does not go under the rails and around the chairs spoils your effect.

 

Perhaps experiment on a separate short length of track separate from the layout. Glue the card down first with castellated sides to pass under the rails.

 

Gordon A

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