Jump to content

Recommended Posts

II'm not sure I'll leave the Land Rover in though. I can't imagine anyone would use an 88 to deliver drums of chemicals. It'll only hold 3 at the most and it would be quite a task to get them in.

 

 

The last photo above, with the wisps of steam on a damp day, looks the part and that Series two / or SIIA looks at home. Why worry about how many drums fit in the back? What says that the poor forlorn Landy has to be the factory hack?

 

In the photo the placement of the model looks great, as if someone has parked with just enough care as to not get in the way of shunting.

 

regards, Graham

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Gratuitious shot with steam effects photoshopped in. :)

Fantastic shot, Ruston - only enhanced by the 'steam'... it's a good overall view anyway, and really captures what this layout is all about! B) ;)

 

Re the Landy; who says it's what the oil drums are delivered in?? Considering how heavy those drums are (ever tried moving a full one? :blink: ) I for one would not just assume that the Landy was used to transport them - and even a Transit wouldn't be able to carry many - it is merely parked in that area (amazingly considerately, as someone else has said!! :D ) while the driver is on other business - maybe he's the Works Mechanic fixing something in the shed? stick a toolbox and some junk parts in the back to give that sort of impression, maybe..?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, OK, I'll keep the Land Rover! :P I didn't mean that it would carry the drums anyway. Full drums leave the works by rail! New empty drums would arrive by rail too. What I was thinking of was a van for local deliveries of smaller consignments, or a small lorry for local deliveries of less than railway wagon-load.

 

I'll probably modify the Land Rover to be a mobile welder unit. They did build some series 2s with a PTO-driven generator and arc welder set in the back. After all, it was the World's Most Versatile Vehicle! I could make some sort of cameo with the landy and a bloke welding some piece of plant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really, really nice. The PS'd shot just exudes atmosphere - well done!

 

 

PS Glad you're keeping the Landy, it fits right in IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, OK, I'll keep the Land Rover!

 

A wise decision. I started with a SIII SWB, went to a SIIA LWB and then to a County 90 V8. Damn decent vehicles.

 

 

I'll probably modify the Land Rover to be a mobile welder unit. They did build some series 2s with a PTO-driven generator and arc welder set in the back.

 

No doubt that there will be some of us who mightl check that you have put the PTO lever in the correct place.

 

regards, Graham

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... I could make some sort of cameo with the landy and a bloke welding some piece of plant.

...but not near all those drums full of inflammable liquids..!! :blink: :D ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure it'll be perfectly safe. :blink:

 

As I've run out of corrugated plasticard and my local model shop is waiting for a delivery from Slaters, I thought I may as well have a do with this here Land Rover and make a start onconverting it to a mobile welder and at the same time correct a few inaccuracies on the basic model.

 

post-494-003519800 1289846210_thumb.jpg

For a start, that heater intake has got to go. Only series 3s had that and it's on the wrong side for a home-market motor anyway.

The wing mirrors are a bit too chunky so they'll be heading for the bin.

 

post-494-020995400 1289846214_thumb.jpg

The ridge on the top of the tub will have to go. This seems to be to locate the top on an optional hard top version of the model.

The rear cross member (fallen off in the photo) is the wrong colour and doesn't have a PTO hole in it so that needs something doing about it.

The Land Rover badge has the extra piece for a Station Wagon badge underneath it so that'll have to go.

The tailgate appears to have fixings for pioneer tools - on a civilian motor. What were they thinking?

 

 

 

 

post-494-017198600 1289846205_thumb.jpg

Oh dear, what have I done? The interior is for a series 3 so I'll have to ditch that horribly realistic plastic interior and get it back to basics. The steering wheel is on the wrong side too!

 

The whole thing is going to get repainted. Deep Bronze Green, the classic Land Rover colour, for the bodywork and wheels with black for the chassis and drivetrain/suspension. I'm also going to ditch the truck cab and attempt to make a full canvas hood but I haven't quite figured out exactly how yet...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a SWB welder at work some years ago it had a truck cab and a tilt.

If you realy want a challenge we also had a LWB version!

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I remember rightly they had the plant permanently fixed in the truck bed and driven via a pto just behind the gearbox. It's all a bit vague now , at the tome it was just a Land Rover with a handy welder in the back.

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not much, young snail. It's too cold, I've been wating on a delivery of corrugated plasticard and I've run out of ballast. The Land Rover now has the basis of a 3/4 tilt but it's unfinished.

 

One other thing - I was all for chucking the whole lot in when the locos wouldn't run anything like reliably and even blamed DCC. I've rebuilt the Ruston with full suspension and it runs better, if quite wobbly. The Hudswell runs better after several hours on the rollers. The Hawthorn Leslie hasn't run since I went DCC because I've still not fitted a chip to it. The Markham is still a pile of castings and etches because I haven't even started to build it. The Ruston 88DS scratchbuild is still in the planning stages but only in my head.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes thats the only problems with layouts in cold places is that you dont feel like wanting to go out and work on them!

 

 

Kristian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes thats the only problems with layouts in cold places is that you dont feel like wanting to go out and work on them!

With you lads on that score.... :( :angry: :angry: If only there was utterly odourless glue, solder and paint around, at least I could work on models indoors even if the layout is up the shed.... and yes, I know acrylic paints are not supposed to smell, but according to my SWMBO, who has a highly developed sense of smell (and asthma), they "stink"..!! :blink: :rolleyes: <_<

 

Some of us have to suffer for our hobby!!

 

Ruston; you're not the only one with DCC troubles; I've recently took the plunge with an NCE Powercab, as I was recently given some US HO scale locos, 3 of which have DCC Chips... so far they aren't working at all, and I haven't a clue why, yet.... :huh: :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A wise decision. I started with a SIII SWB, went to a SIIA LWB and then to a County 90 V8. Damn decent vehicles.

 

 

 

 

No doubt that there will be some of us who mightl check that you have put the PTO lever in the correct place.

 

regards, Graham

No excuses Dave, my 4mm springside series 3 had 5 levers added: Handbrake, Overdrive, red knob, yellow knob and main gearstick, I even kinked the Handbrake and min gear lever. Sadly can't be seen because I screwed the glazing up. Looking forward to seeing the welder finished its an interesting project, and I think its a great layout so hope you get the running issues sorted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I received a Slaters tank wagon kit for Christmas and it's spurred me on to finish the one I bought myself a month or two ago. I've also finished the other anchor mount tank. I used the better of the resin tanks that came with the Powsides kit and persevered with it.

post-494-0-59029100-1293381559_thumb.jpg

 

post-494-0-03213800-1293381587_thumb.jpg

They all need weathering, including spillage and horribleness down the tanksides.

 

And then there's this building. I'm not too sure what it does. Maybe a boiler house and the hand crane is used for unloading coal wagons?

post-494-0-98802900-1293381661_thumb.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've added another rectangular tank to the tar fleet.

 

It's not exactly prototypically true because I made it from the left over scraps from 4 other kits and the wheels from a long-abandoned project. I think it will look the part once weathered though. There are no rivets in the tank as it's meant to be an insulated type. The timber baulks at the ends are real wood with card corners plates. The tank is made up from plasticard. The vertical stanchions on the ends are scrap plastruct section with some nut mouldings glued on. The headstocks are from plasticard and the frame sides from a GWR van kit with 7mm cut out to shorten the wheelbase. The inside V-hanger is from the same kit but the outside one was made from brass sheet. The rodding through the timbers is iron wire threaded through a piece of plastic rod that I drilled out. The tank filler is made from some sort of plastic bung that was lying around the garage and a shirt button with a plasticard disc on top and also various scraps of plastic rod as the hinge and fastener.

post-494-0-97334500-1294244305_thumb.jpg

 

And then there's the loading shed gaffer, standing on the steps of the building to oversee the yard.

post-494-0-97345900-1294244430_thumb.jpg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That loading shed gaffer, not called Fred is he, by any chance ?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could be. ;)

 

I've done a bit more work on the engineering department's building.

post-494-0-46031400-1294602850_thumb.jpg

 

It's going to have lighting inside to show off the interior. I'll probably make a lathe, a workbench and a few other things to go inside. That drainpipe is too short, I know. :angry: I'll have to re-do that. I'm going to have to put a diesel tank (for fuelling the Ruston and for road vehicles) next to that wall. It would look better under the staircase at the other side of the tracks but then you have to think about how it would be filled. It wouldn't be large enough to warrant being filled from a rail tank so it would have been delivered by road and then how would a road vehicle get to the other side of the tracks? I'm just thinking of the "road vehicles in silly places" topic y' see...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The tank could be serviced by an imaginary pipe under the track, rising to a valved connector anywhere in reasonable reach of the road, couldn't it? Just thinking....

 

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good idea! I'll do that.

 

I've made the tank, painted it, made a hose and nozzle and planted it.

 

post-494-0-70472500-1295122601_thumb.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Luffly!

 

 

[minor, well intentioned critique, wouldn't there be a bit of spilt stuff splashed around?]

 

 

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking the same about spilt diesel, but perhaps a lot rather than a bit if any of the farm tanks that I have used over the years are anything to go by, some on the pipe as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gimme a chance! :P The paint is barely dry so I don't want to add anything else lest it make the base coat of black come off before it's had a chance to harden.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been making a few bits for the interior of the engineering dept.

 

First off - a pillar drill.

post-494-0-74126200-1295294189_thumb.jpg

 

Painted and installed in the workshop.

post-494-0-58047400-1295294227_thumb.jpg

 

I've also made the bench, shelving (with bits 'n' pieces, paint pots etc.) and the oxy-acetylene set. I had the oxygen cylinder and the trolley as cast whitemetal items but I made the acetylene cylinder, regulator and pipe myself. I've also added a vice, made from plastic strips, to the pillar drill.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.