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Tony Wright

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Craig,

 

I really don't have much of an idea what the 'DX' and 'FX' descriptions mean, but there must be an obvious difference. Regards,

 

 

Tony. 

 

 

If memory serves it relates to the sensor size, ‘D’ being the smaller digital sensor the earlier types of digital cameras had, and ‘F’ relating to a 35mm neg sized sensor. When I changed from film to digital I was looking at both Nikon and Canon, I found the right spec Canon body first hence went that route rather than Nikon.

Edited by PMP
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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Craig,

 

I really don't have much of an idea what the 'DX' and 'FX' descriptions mean, but there must be an obvious difference. 

 

I know both the Nikon digital bodies I have were (at the time) the 'pro'-spec for the company, both giving full-frame capability. Strangely, the Df didn't prove as popular as anticipated (the digital equivalent of the legendary F), but I love mine. It has all the controls on the outside of the body - all dials and so on. All worked by digits!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/89683101_NikonDfandF.jpg.a6f53078df7bea4bb6f04a0491173c36.jpg

 

 

'Ancient' (on the right) and 'modern' (on the left). Both are naturally 'used' (and abused), and both are all-black - the only colour for 'pro' cameras. The old 'F' (the camera type which went to Vietnam, where the photographer was blown up and the next guy just picked it up and carried on taking pictures. One actually saved the picture-taker's life by deflecting a bullet!) has the new lens attached. 

 

I've no wish to turn this into a thread about photography (but, gosh, it does go off in all directions), though I hope this topic is of some little interest. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

The Df was Nikons foray into digital cameras but with a smaller body rekindling the look of the F film camera but with a full frame digital sensor. A very good camera it is too. I had a whole raft of the original Pro Olympus lenses so decided to stay with their retro offerings of the OM range.

 

Regards

 

Peter

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Back to some modelling for me. Here's some N/2mm hand brake wheels attached to wire ready to be added to a 3D printed diesel brake tender. They are fairly small - that's a 5p piece they are sitting on:

 

DSC_8419.JPG.d9201b199d9bc9f07f6647616ef654d9.JPG

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42 minutes ago, Dr Gerbil-Fritters said:

....Now I just use my phone, and hate myself a little bit more each time.

 

There’s nothing wrong with using a ‘phone for everyday photography, if you have an eye for a good angle and composition, you still have that whatever camera you use.  But ‘phones do very quickly lose their resolution when you digitally zoom in on the subject.

 

You still need ‘proper kit’ if you are taking high-res studio shots or your work is to be published.

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4 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Craig,

 

I really don't have much of an idea what the 'DX' and 'FX' descriptions mean, but there must be an obvious difference. 

 

I know both the Nikon digital bodies I have were (at the time) the 'pro'-spec for the company, both giving full-frame capability. Strangely, the Df didn't prove as popular as anticipated (the digital equivalent of the legendary F), but I love mine. It has all the controls on the outside of the body - all dials and so on. All worked by digits!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/89683101_NikonDfandF.jpg.a6f53078df7bea4bb6f04a0491173c36.jpg

 

 

'Ancient' (on the right) and 'modern' (on the left). Both are naturally 'used' (and abused), and both are all-black - the only colour for 'pro' cameras. The old 'F' (the camera type which went to Vietnam, where the photographer was blown up and the next guy just picked it up and carried on taking pictures. One actually saved the picture-taker's life by deflecting a bullet!) has the new lens attached. 

 

I've no wish to turn this into a thread about photography (but, gosh, it does go off in all directions), though I hope this topic is of some little interest. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

FX cameras have a full-frame sensor, same size as a 35mm film neg. DX models (including the D3 and all other early Nikon digital SLRS) have a smaller one. Not necessarily with fewer megapixels, though.

 

First Nikon with a full-frame sensor was (IIRC) the D800 and cameras so equipped (the Df excepted) nowadays* have 3-digit model numbers.

 

*There was a D300 in the past which had the smaller DX sensor, but that predated the full-frame range.

 

John

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If I had the money I would go Nikon full frame DSLR.

 

My current kit is old 1960s Miranda and Tamron, prime lenses, and a light leaking camera body.

 

So no ties to old kit.

 

I do like Nikon lenses and Sony image sensors.

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12 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 

'Ancient' (on the right) and 'modern' (on the left). Both are naturally 'used' (and abused), and both are all-black - the only colour for 'pro' cameras. The old 'F' (the camera type which went to Vietnam, where the photographer was blown up and the next guy just picked it up and carried on taking pictures. One actually saved the picture-taker's life by deflecting a bullet!) has the new lens attached.  

 

12 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 

Here is a photo of Don McCullin's Nikon F which saved his life. I saw this camera many years ago at the Museum of Photography Film and TV in Bradford. I believe it is now in the Imperial War Museum in Manchester. Don was later badly injured by a shell and continued to take photos on his way to hospital.                           

Don McCullin - Nikon F

 

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Tony,

 

I see from the December Railway Modeller that Little Bytham is to feature in the January 2020 edition. By pure coincidence my article on my previous layout Fairhaven Road is also to appear in the same issue. Thank you for the photos which you took and allowed me to send to them along with mine. I hope they credit you, as I asked Steve to do. 

 

Archie

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7 hours ago, Dunsignalling said:

FX cameras have a full-frame sensor, same size as a 35mm film neg. DX models (including the D3 and all other early Nikon digital SLRS) have a smaller one. Not necessarily with fewer megapixels, though.

 

First Nikon with a full-frame sensor was (IIRC) the D800 and cameras so equipped (the Df excepted) nowadays* have 3-digit model numbers.

 

*There was a D300 in the past which had the smaller DX sensor, but that predated the full-frame range.

 

John

 

I think you’ll find that the D3 has a full-frame sensor, not the smaller DX sized sensor.  It was the first full-frame digital SLR offered by Nikon.

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1 hour ago, 4630 said:

 

I think you’ll find that the D3 has a full-frame sensor, not the smaller DX sized sensor.  It was the first full-frame digital SLR offered by Nikon.

Thanks, I'd been under the impression that the D3 was merely the successor to the D2.

 

It does explain why used D2 bodies can currently be had for under £200 whilst a D3 can still command about five times that.

 

John

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23 minutes ago, Dunsignalling said:

Thanks, I'd been under the impression that the D3 was merely the successor to the D2.

 

It does explain why used D2 bodies can currently be had for under £200 whilst a D3 can still command about five times that.

 

John

 

It’s not always been easy to follow Nikon’s numbering policy for its DSLR cameras.

 

As you say, the numbering convention for its ‘professional line’ of cameras, using single digits, kind of implies that the sensor size of the D3 would follow on  from the D2 variants. 

 

Especially as their second full frame DSLR was the D700, but then later had the full-frame D600 and D650 slotted in below in the range.  The much later D500 is though a DX sensor.

 

All capable, solid cameras that were better than their predecessors, although the D600 had some significant quality control issues IIRC. 

 

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Not Buffalos, but CAC Boomerangs. Boomerangs were developed from the CAC Wirraway trainer a licenced built version of the North American NA-16.

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25 minutes ago, Pebbles said:

Not Buffalos, but CAC Boomerangs. Boomerangs were developed from the CAC Wirraway trainer a licenced built version of the North American NA-16.

Correct

Andrew

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I did a road trip with my wife in 2015 (8000km in three weeks) and on the way back passed through Narromine to discover trials for an airshow the next day.  My wife was very happy to stop and watch. I was watching and taking photos when this Avenger appeared and I was in love. Sounded fantastic and looked, well, you can see. Taken with Nikon D750 and 70-200 VR F2.8

 

Regards,

 

Craig Warton

Avenger.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Craigw said:

I did a road trip with my wife in 2015 (8000km in three weeks) and on the way back passed through Narromine to discover trials for an airshow the next day.  My wife was very happy to stop and watch. I was watching and taking photos when this Avenger appeared and I was in love. Sounded fantastic and looked, well, you can see. Taken with Nikon D750 and 70-200 VR F2.8

 

Regards,

 

Craig Warton

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/Avenger.jpg.37d23ff0b6fb1dc078bfaca9f283669b.jpg

 

What a great photograph!

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12 hours ago, Woodcock29 said:

Strange when trying to add a new post RMweb brings up my last post like others have indicated previously!

 

Whilst we're on the subject of cameras I've been using the amateur range of Nikon DSLRs which generally suit my purpose.  Currently I use a D7000 and before that D70s.  In the 'old days' I was an Olympus man and thought the Zuiko lenses were second to none. However, for model railway photography I've gone over to using a compact camera, in fact the Canon G12 like that used by Gilbert Barnatt on his Peterborough North thread.

 

Now for something completely different (I hope Tony doesn't object) I've added a few photos I took at an Air Show here in Adelaide last weekend which show that even with amateur range cameras and lenses its possible to achieve quite reasonable outcomes. These were taken with the D7000 using a Nikon ED 70-300mm lens. Obviously not of professional standard they still look quite good - I've done a small amount of work on them mainly to crop a bit and to adjust the lighting. the variation in sky blue is interesting but that varies as much depending on the angle of the sun of course.

 

Andrew

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/173796849_DSC_2587ps1.jpg.04829f06d689916ff044ac18880457c4.jpg

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/1834980726_DSC_1835ps1.jpg.0b9346713f917c734edb61a16463ffd4.jpg

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/1001203538_DSC_2109ps1.jpg.bfd65dd93de5dd96cd2e3576195b9d09.jpg

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/1175049828_DSC_2267ps1.jpg.62f9acde8331a04b1247976b8e11a6a3.jpg

Why should I mind, Andrew?

 

Who would?

 

I've just finished reading a book about the Spitfire by John Nichol. I thoroughly recommend it. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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On 05/11/2019 at 16:48, Tony Wright said:

More and more at shows now, when I'm demonstrating modelling techniques, I 'build' a plastic wagon kit. 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/1761785460_Parksideex-LNERhorsebox.jpg.2131bbae433c8ab8af6694a4aef5dccb.jpg

 

I started this Parkside LNER horsebox at Spalding on Saturday morning, completing it this morning. Though I've weathered the chassis, the bodywork still needs a touch of toning down. 

 

Soldering complex metal kits together can seem a bit daunting, but the plastic wagon kit is a splendid introduction to the delights of personal model-making. I'd be astonished if even the least-experienced modellers could not build/paint/complete something as simple-to-put-together as this. 

 

 

As it happens, I've just completed my own version of this kit.

 

 

Post_10.JPG.8688b41549a9572633e6dec7ef667bf1.JPG

 

Different modellers, different approaches!

(And my photography isn't very good either!)

 

I like to add some more features to the running gear (although only those which can be seen from the side!)

These include:

Making the cross-shaft thicker. I use insulation stripped from old layout wire

Adding the safety straps.

Adding (some) of the VB pull gear.

 

On this kit I re-made the lower footsteps with copper and brass elements soldered up. In the above picture the vertical support looks a bit bent, but I'm pretty sure that that happened with similar originals anyway. 

I also replaced the handrails and door handles with brass.

 

It was difficult to find any pictures of these vehicles in LNER livery, but there was some useful help on the LNER forum ... here and previous page) - I was able to add the additional vertical control pipe on the compartment end, 

Of course, this was built on my home workbench and not while demonstrating at a show!

(Not something that I would be able to do very well!

 

Thank you Mr Wright for encouraging us all.

(Now I have to get back to boring layout wiring!)

 

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I've now built three DJH C2s. The other was the one rejected by my 'customer' as being way below 'his' standard (the only loco I've ever built which anyone has been dissatisfied with). One observation of his was that the tender made a noise as it went over pointwork! At first I was 'hurt', but then I saw his layout at a show. Non-prototypical, an unworkable trackplan, incorrect liveries on carriages, non-working signals (good job, because their siting was nonsense), no lamps on locos, no crews, and it ran like a bag of rusty nails. I'm now delighted I didn't match his 'standard'! Why should I lower mine to do so? 

 

 

 

The idea of an  "standard" for exhibition layouts is an interesting thought. ;)

 

Andy

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A quick improvement to the aircraft images would be to select a shutter speed of 1/250th or 1/125th sec which will give the propellers some movement.

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9 minutes ago, Andy Reichert said:

 

The idea of an  "standard" for exhibition layouts is an interesting thought. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_wink3.gif

 

Andy


‘Exhibition Standard’, discuss. Use one side of the internet, you may start now.

 

That’ll break the Internet if anything will... :)

 

 

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2 hours ago, drmditch said:

 

As it happens, I've just completed my own version of this kit.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/Post_10.JPG.8688b41549a9572633e6dec7ef667bf1.JPG

 

Different modellers, different approaches!

(And my photography isn't very good either!)

 

I like to add some more features to the running gear (although only those which can be seen from the side!)

These include:

Making the cross-shaft thicker. I use insulation stripped from old layout wire

Adding the safety straps.

Adding (some) of the VB pull gear.

 

On this kit I re-made the lower footsteps with copper and brass elements soldered up. In the above picture the vertical support looks a bit bent, but I'm pretty sure that that happened with similar originals anyway. 

I also replaced the handrails and door handles with brass.

 

It was difficult to find any pictures of these vehicles in LNER livery, but there was some useful help on the LNER forum ... here and previous page) - I was able to add the additional vertical control pipe on the compartment end, 

Of course, this was built on my home workbench and not while demonstrating at a show!

(Not something that I would be able to do very well!

 

Thank you Mr Wright for encouraging us all.

(Now I have to get back to boring layout wiring!)

 

That's a far more detailed model than mine.

 

Thanks for showing us. You've used replacement ventilators as well (cast metal?) - the plastic ones supplied are really puny. 

 

Mr. Wright? No, Tony.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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