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Wright writes.....


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Some more locos for sale on behalf of a good cause................

 

All the builders of these are unknown (one of the chaps who might have known is no longer with us). 

 

938100920_DJHU.jpg.6a2e36f2123980e08512b29e308ace91.jpg

 

A DJH U. A beautiful runner.

 

1655139450_GEMGeorgetheFifth.jpg.84a3fa5c52c3fcd73fc1a2ae782f83ba.jpg

 

A GEM George the Fifth. Mounted on a Tri-ang L1 mechanism, it's a remarkably good runner. 

 

42698329_LY2-4-2T.jpg.3d72c36dcea9f038d55e04ff9726a1ee.jpg

 

An ex-L&Y 2-4-2T (anyone know whose kit this might be?). Despite its K's wheels, it runs fine. 

 

441664834_StephenPooleY5.jpg.d5e0228fbd9621d94bf4706d866636ac.jpg

 

A Stephen Poole Y5. It has a K's HP2M motor, which means it's not that quiet. That said, it's visually very smooth. 

 

425595440_WatfordTank.jpg.a8ced8957da6b2c7500fcdf7919c96b5.jpg

 

And a Watford Tank (again, anyone know what this kit might be, please?). Another beautiful runner.

 

I've checked all these out, cleaned and oiled them as necessary. Would anyone interested in buying any, please PM me. 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

In the early '70s, I taught with a guy whose father had worked on 10000, and he said the name came from the 'secrecy' surrounding its building.

 

That was the reason given in an encyclopedia my Grandfather had that I used to read avidly (well, the railway and aircraft related bits) in the early 60's as a young boy.  

 

Of course, encyclopedias by their very nature  are not specialist publications and presumably are (were?) produced by jobbing researchers/authors, are not definitive references and were always out of date.    Or is that an appalling generalisation!

 

Alan

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I'm not surprised the U has gone as it looks very nicely made, and I don't recall seeing it in the DJH range for some while. I'd have put an offer in if I wasn't away from my PC.

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

Good morning Andrew,

 

I think you've provided the 'definitive' answer; thank you.

 

The reason I use my images from time to time is because the question keeps cropping up (I, obviously, have no prototype pictures). 

 

My mention of 'battleship grey' is because that is the colour described in so many publications. What was its official description? 

 

Another question? What is the origin of the loco's nickname? In the early '70s, I taught with a guy whose father had worked on 10000, and he said the name came from the 'secrecy' surrounding its building. However, a (late) professional railwayman I spoke to decades ago, who'd actually fired it, said it was because of the sound it made when running.

 

Interesting.................

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Good afternoon Tony,

 

I'm not sure if there was an official description. I would have to go trawling through tons of stuff to check. I recall it was a mix of two colours, one was a 'named grey' and I think the other was charcoal. I know that Laurie Loveless examined the Darlington apprentice model and found evidence of the original paint work, the repaint is well documented in the insurance claim. There was talk raising money to restore the Darlington model to its original condition but nothing seems to have come of it.

 

I think that the term 'Hush Hush' predates the completion of the locomotive, this would fit as there was a great deal of secrecy surrounding its design and construction. However, there is no doubt the locomotive had a very distinctive 'whispering'  exhaust, one that would fit with the onomatopoeia nature of 'Hush Hush'.

 

There is a clip of colour film of the locomotive, traveling with the dynamometer car at perhaps thirty or forty miles per hour and prior to the fitting of the double chimney. The exhaust is unlike any other LNER locomotive, having eight beats (more like pulses) to the turn of the wheel. Those on a thread in another place, wishing to equip their high pressure 4 cylinder compound, with DCC sound from A4, seem to have little understanding of either locomotive.

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1 hour ago, Headstock said:

There is a clip of colour film of the locomotive, traveling with the dynamometer car at perhaps thirty or forty miles per hour and prior to the fitting of the double chimney.

 

Is it available online, do you have a link please?

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1 hour ago, PupCam said:

 

Is it available online, do you have a link please?

 

Good afternoon PupCam,

 

I think the film is on one of the steam on 35 mm video / DVD / Whatever. I haven't looked at it in years. However, I did an online search and came up with this rather poor copy, that looks like it has been filmed off the TV screen.

 

I think that the original was probably BW not colour, just my memory cheating.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tf2k7xVxcYo

 

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7 minutes ago, Headstock said:

I think the film is on one of the steam on 35 mm video / DVD / Whatever.

 Thanks.  Sounds like one of John Huntley's offerings.

 

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6 minutes ago, PupCam said:

 Thanks.  Sounds like one of John Huntley's offerings.

 

 

I think so, I can't remember which one, I will have a look later. The unique nature of the exhaust is quite apparent, even in the poor quality copy seen in the link.

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5 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Another question? What is the origin of the loco's nickname? In the early '70s, I taught with a guy whose father had worked on 10000, and he said the name came from the 'secrecy' surrounding its building. However, a (late) professional railwayman I spoke to decades ago, who'd actually fired it, said it was because of the sound it made when running.

 

Interesting.................

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

What noise does a galloping sausage actually make? 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Headstock said:

 

I think so, I can't remember which one, I will have a look later. The unique nature of the exhaust is quite apparent, even in the poor quality copy seen in the link.

https://www.huntleyarchives.com/results.asp?txtkeys1=Hush Hush&category=RR

 

This looks like the clip (towards the end) in the Huntley Archive.    Whilst I don't doubt the loco had a sound all of its own, the source states that the film is silent.  

 

Are you sure the sound on the clip is not just a bit of generic dubbing (please tell me it's not a Castle or a King!)?

 

Alan

Edited by PupCam
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Tony,

 

the Watford Tank will be from a GEM kit. Later ones have an etched brass kit. The appearance of the brake shoes might indicate it is one of these.

 

Jol

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23 minutes ago, PupCam said:

https://www.huntleyarchives.com/results.asp?txtkeys1=Hush Hush&category=RR

 

This looks like the clip (towards the end) in the Huntley Archive.    Whilst I don't doubt the loco had a sound all of its own, the source states that the film is silent.  

 

Are you sure the sound on the clip is not just a bit of generic dubbing (please tell me it's not a Castle or a King!)?

 

Alan

 

My apologies Alan, 

 

I don't quite understand your post. There is no sound recording of the locomotive, all we can go on is the ear witness reports that describe the uniqueness of that sound. I was referring to the way the smoke visually exited the chimney in the clip. At eight beats per rev and at speed, it must have sounded like a whispering machine gun.
 

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5 minutes ago, Headstock said:

There is no sound recording of the locomotive, all we can go on is the ear witness reports that describe the uniqueness of that sound. I was referring to the way the smoke visually exited the chimney in the clip. At eight beats per rev and at speed, it must have sounded like a whispering machine gun.

 

Ah, sorry !    We're at cross-purposes but that's sorted now.     What we need is a clever fluid dynamicist with a very big computer to model the steam paths, valve events and other factors in order to actually re-create the sound.     That'll rule me out then!

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32 minutes ago, Headstock said:

 

My apologies Alan, 

 

I don't quite understand your post. There is no sound recording of the locomotive, all we can go on is the ear witness reports that describe the uniqueness of that sound. I was referring to the way the smoke visually exited the chimney in the clip. At eight beats per rev and at speed, it must have sounded like a whispering machine gun.
 

Or, with 8 beats per revolution, Maunsell Lord Nelson :scratchhead:

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I'm not sure at all that 10000 would have 8 beats per revolution - as it was a compound, only the low pressure cylinders would exhaust to atmosphere, making 4 beats from the two low pressure cylinders.  The only explanation would be that when working simple engine to start, the high pressure cylinders exhausted to atmosphere - I find that hard to believe as it would really complicate matters.

 

Castle and Kings etc didn't have 8 beats either - the cylinders exhausted together .  The Nelsons did have 8 though!

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22 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Something new (and unusual?) on Little Bytham today. 

 

1849795591_HornbyNBType2.jpg.a4e90c31b9077950199b0ac2f114a24f.jpg

 

This is a conversion from a Hornby NB diesel-hydraulic Type 2 into one of the (ill-fated) diesel-electric ones, completed by a friend.

 

He's done a lot of work on the original, and I think it looks quite presentable. No doubt Clive will tell us (I hope) what's wrong (or, with luck, what's right) with it.

 

With its original wheels opened out to the correct b-t-b and its flanges turned down, it actually works (astonishingly) well through all types of pointwork, even with its pancake-type motor.  Yes, I know the wheels should be spoked. 

For what it's worth - I saw that loco, on delivery from Doncaster along with D6112, approaching Chesterton Junction on the St.Ives loop (now the infamous misguided busway).

 

Stewart

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7 minutes ago, New Haven Neil said:

I'm not sure at all that 10000 would have 8 beats per revolution - as it was a compound, only the low pressure cylinders would exhaust to atmosphere, making 4 beats from the two low pressure cylinders.  The only explanation would be that when working simple engine to start, the high pressure cylinders exhausted to atmosphere - I find that hard to believe as it would really complicate matters.

 

Castle and Kings etc didn't have 8 beats either - the cylinders exhausted together .  The Nelsons did have 8 though!

Of course. I forgot it was a compound. You are right

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7 hours ago, MarkC said:

The L & Y 2-4-2T is possibly Cotswold, Tony? Looking at the leading and trailing wheels, it's that sort of vintage.

 

Mark

Tony,

 

I agree with Mark. I have a Cotswold kit of the L and Y 2-4-× T and the box and it looks familiar. Cannot do detailed check at the moment as they are packed away.

 

Tom D

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On the subject of sound, I've never seen any mention of what the Turbomotive sounded like - presumably a sort of continuous roaring whoosh, with no chuffing chuffing?

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1 hour ago, New Haven Neil said:

Castle and Kings etc didn't have 8 beats either - the cylinders exhausted together .  The Nelsons did have 8 though!

 

That's all foreign talk to me  :)

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15 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks again, Clive.

 

I was told the front end (and rear end, which is which?) had been extensively modified. 

 

Does Dapol produce such a loco today? Not that you've got one, I'd imagine - have you scratch-built one? 

 

Though they were originally employed on the southern end of the ECML, I never saw one in reality. I believe they were rapidly removed to 'home waters', much further north, such was their unreliability. I did see several examples of the WR hydraulic equivalents. Were they any better?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Dapol produce a very fine model of a Class 21/ D61xx. It was released just before Covid so pretty recent. Here is mine running on Gresley Jn. I’m not sure if this is prototypically accurate as I can only find one picture of the real things running on the GN  - and that was on a railtour!

 

2711936E-F3AB-44E5-9B19-7AC264FBF44A.jpeg.f9a4ca3e897e4d12432dd9cdad360964.jpeg

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