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Camel Quay - A North Cornwall inspired layout in 4mm


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A couple of summers ago, I landed down on Newlyn Marina after a rather long rail journey with so many changes I thought I’d never get there before the tide went out - then, only as far as Penzance before getting a taxi to the harbour. You see, I was joining a friend on his small yacht back from Portugal to give him a hand to sail it back to North Wales. After rounding Lands End, our first stop was Padstow Harbour, alongside the wall once reserved for merchant vessels, where we tucked into some well-earned traditional Cornish pasties.

So, I now ‘knew’ the place even though the railway had long gone. Little did I know this was going to become the subject for a future model based on the North Cornwall Railway. Little did I know, then, I would even be getting into model railways.

The following Christmas, I watched James May’s Top Toys – say no more....down to the model shop....

At the time, there seemed to be a lot of Southern Railway locos and rolling stock available some of which, with a little renumbering/modification, would be suitable for a NCR layout. Needless to say, it had to be steam. Before long, I had amassed a collection of identifying stock including T9s, West Country, N Class and Beattie Well Tank locos; Maunsell and Bullied coaches; and some vans and wagons including those china clay ones.

Using relevant material, I set about planning a layout. It needed to be of a size that could be put up and used at home or be portable to take to the Railway Modelling Group’s unit or to exhibition using our car. This limited the overall size to 10ft 9in x 1ft 4in.

The track plan was derived from the track plans in Branchline to Padstow, Middleton Press. Obviously, with the space available some serious adjustments would be required. With the width available, only the single terminus platform (shortened) with run around loop and carriage siding would be modelled there being no room for the adjacent fish shed. The quay was sited at the other end of the layout with a kick back siding leading to a passing loop along the wall on the Camel Estuary.

Padstow was appealing because, although it was, seemingly, just a small end of the line station overlooked by the imposing Metropole Hotel, in its heyday, it served tourist passengers on the Atlantic Coast Express, a thriving fish industry and the transportation of china clay, coal and agricultural produce. This would give ample opportunity for a range of operational scenarios.

The baseboards were built a year ago using modified Brilliant Baseboards modules then progress came to a standstill while other things took over my time.

January 2013, time to get stuck in….

Edited by tender
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Hi Ray, This looks really interesting, I look forward to seeing the buildings develope and also the Harbour.

 

You have  already overtaken Jeff, (Physicsman) :O  although it's not a race and you have a lot less to do. :no:  

 

Will Polly be giving you a hand or she too busy with Great West Road? :nono:

 

Good luck and ENJOY.

 

Andy :sungum:

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OK, I admit it, you've got me hooked.

 

This looks realy interesting and can't wait to see it develop.

 

I also like the look of the Peco 75 with the sleepers being re-spaced.

 

Duncan

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Will Polly be giving you a hand or she too busy with Great West Road? :nono:

 

Andy :sungum:

 

Hi Andy

I hope so, I'm ok with building stuff but when it comes to visualising things such as landscapes etc i draw a blank. Polly's the artistic member of the family so will be drawing on her expertise in this area.

 

I also like the look of the Peco 75 with the sleepers being re-spaced.

 

Duncan

Hi Duncan

Nothing original there, this has been well documented by Andy Y in these pages somewhere. The modifications to the turnouts are a little more unusual, it's surprising how many exhibition layouts have them laid un modified. IMO removing the switching mechanism improves the appearance no end.

Edited by tender
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......and the standard of ballasting are first class.

Hi Ray,very nice modeling!! very neat ballasting.... :sungum: :locomotive:

Hi Scouser, Class66

Many thanks for your comments regarding the ballast. Personally I think the grain size is a little on the large size but the increased sleeper spacing helps the illusion. When I was testing out a few options I did try some 'N' gauge ballast but using this method of laying track and ballast together it came out looking more like concrete. It is a very quick method and beats the hell out of poking around bits of ballast with a brush and dropping dilute PVA/Klear from an eyedropper. That would drive me insane if I had a lot to do. I think it would look even better with SMP or C&L track with their thinner sleepers.

Hi Ray

 

Great start to is going to be an excellent layout... Will I be seeing you or this in part at the Llanberis show this month Feb...

 

Jamie

Hi Jamie.

We'll be going to Lanberis with AVAGO and Camel Quay as a work in progress/Modelling Demo.

 

BTW Jamie,saw this on 'Wheal Elizabeth' at Stafford last weekend and thought of you.

post-11105-0-02872700-1359974282.jpg

Edited by tender
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Next stage - wiring the layout.

 

Spurred on by the thread 'Show us under your baseboard' I was determined to avoid the usual birds nest of wiring and keep it to the bare minimum.

The layout will be DCC operated from a NCE Powercab system using an expanded macro controller system that I used for AVAGO and accessories from Tam Valley Depot.

 

post-11105-0-21116700-1360000764_thumb.jpg

First a DCC bus was laid under the full length of the baseboard using self adhesive copper bus strip. 0.8mm holes were drilled next to each rail section and brass droppers soldered to the outside of the rail sections passing through the baseboard and short wires linked these to the DCC bus.

 

post-11105-0-70271700-1360000899_thumb.jpg

R/C servos were fitted under each turnout on a piece of 4mm foamboard using my new found friend a 'hot glue gun'. These are connected to Tam Valley Depot singlet servo controllers wired to the DCC bus.

 

post-11105-0-47933700-1360001064_thumb.jpg

These have manual push buttons and indicators as well as DCC operation.

 

post-11105-0-74099900-1360001199_thumb.jpg

They were mounted on the rear of the baseboard at the appropriate position for manual control and troubleshooting along with the UTP panel for the Powercab throttle to plug into.

 

post-11105-0-00157300-1360001333_thumb.jpg

This is the complete wiring for one board (platform end). The small pcb in the middle is a dual frog juicer for the two turnout live frogs. The only connection between baseboards is the white two pin connector that carries the DCC bus between boards.

 

The quay end board is wired the same with 2 servo singlets and another dual frog juicer, and the centre board has 6 servo singlets, a hex frog juicer plus a DCC 5 amp booster (also from Tam Vally Depot). I felt with 10 accessory decoders (singlets), 10 frog juicers and a few sound locos it all might be a bit too much for the Powercab alone.

Wiring complete, the layout was fully tested with a selection of locos from Beattie Well Tank to West Country class for any problems. Thankfully all seems to be OK. Mission accomplished.

 

Next job - adding the back scenes.

Edited by tender
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I am considering changing my turnout control from SEEP solenoids over to servos as I am finding the route selection to be unreliable so I am interested to see how well these work. I do like our method of fixing them in place. Frog Juicers leads installed on many turnouts so the change over would be relatively easy.

 

I have a strong interest in North Devon and North Cornwall railways so look forward to seeing your layout progress.

 

Ian

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Morning young Ray, I am very impresed with the wiring you have done, I thought mine was tidy but this is really good. I have only ever used Peco, Seep, wire in tube or third finger solinoid for points so I am learning from all you Lunes, Sheds, and just about every body that has moved on from the above methods.

 

Lovely bit of ballasting as well Ray. Well done and please keep the pics coming

 

 

 

HEY I HAVE JUST THOUGHT as we have Lunester, Shedster, Trebster, YOU SHOULD BE THE QUAYSTER  :mail:

 

Old Quayster :sungum: 

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Hi Scouser, Class66

Many thanks for your comments regarding the ballast. Personally I think the grain size is a little on the large size but the increased sleeper spacing helps the illusion. When I was testing out a few options I did try some 'N' gauge ballast but using this method of laying track and ballast together it came out looking more like concrete. It is a very quick method and beats the hell out of poking around bits of ballast with a brush and dropping dilute PVA/Klear from an eyedropper. That would drive me insane if I had a lot to do. I think it would look even better with SMP or C&L track with their thinner sleepers.

Hi Jamie.

We'll be going to Lanberis with AVAGO and Camel Quay as a work in progress/Modelling Demo.

 

BTW Jamie,saw this on 'Wheal Elizabeth' at Stafford last weekend and thought of you.

attachicon.gifjamie.JPG

Hi Ray

Very nice coming along great. That engine i think is made from the Match box model similar to the one I made for GTD.Just over a week to get it all finished??? Will we see you this week end.

 

Peter.

 

PS Andy POLLYESTER I think you will have to start wearing a tin hat if Poly is around, also what am I now?

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PS Andy POLLYESTER I think you will have to start wearing a tin hat if Poly is around, also what am I now?

 

I hereby nominate Great Tunster for said Title.

 

Signed: Quayster (First Mate)

Edited by southern42
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Resin castings for the wall and platform edges arrived today.

 

The wall castings have been given a key of Plasticote before being epoxied to the baseboard.

post-11105-0-98198100-1360187340_thumb.jpg

 

The platform edges need a little thinking about before assembly to make sure the platform surface aligns in the groove of the moulding. I also have to decide if to make the platform in one piece which will then need to be removable as it crosses a board join or make it in two halves and risk have an unsightly join across it.

 

Couldn't resist another photo shoot.

 

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This time Beattie Well Tank 30586 with Maunsell 2P set 23 in Carmine & Cream as depicted in Branch line to Padstow (Middleton Press) plate 112.

The Hornby BCK at the front just needs re-numbering and the set number added. The BTK at the rear is not quite right as it should be a diagram 2114 coach. As Hornby haven't produced one yet this has been substituted with a Hornby BTK diagram 2102 for the time being.

Edited by tender
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Had a day off work today so made a start on the station platform.

 

I've decided to make the platform in one piece which will be removable when the layout is moved.

 

post-11105-0-99675600-1360359601_thumb.jpg

 

First I epoxied the individual pieces to a length on 44x12mm strip wood. Due to the moulding process the thickness of each piece was a little inconsistent but a quick rub over a course sandpaper on a flat surface soon sorted that out.

 

post-11105-0-33195100-1360359855_thumb.jpg

 

Ive just constructed a frame for the whole platform with three captive location screws passing through the base board held in place by thumbscrews underneath. When the glue dries I will be covering the frame with 6mm MDF before applying the final finish.

 

Moving on to the other end of the layout, Polly has been playing around with ideas for hiding the fiddle yard entrance.

 

post-11105-0-76861700-1360360189_thumb.jpg

 

One using an arched wide bridge.

 

post-11105-0-21705900-1360360240_thumb.jpg

 

The other using a girder bridge.

 

On the platform on top go the fiddle yard will be a row of low relief buildings with a road in front swinging around onto the bridge.

 

I can't help thinking that the arch bridge is a bit too oblique to be believable.

Behind whatever bridge we decide to use will be a deep tree lined cutting to hide the entrance.

 

We've been looking for prototypical examples for ideas on the style of bridge and a stone arch seems to be most favourable. Not seen any girder type examples as yet so still keeping an open mind to this.

 

Any suggestions welcome.

 

Ray.

Edited by tender
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Hi Ray, lt was good to meet you and Polly at stafford on saturday, and put faces to names at last, l was with AndrewP and we had a brief chat, the layout is coming on very well and is looking good, must agree with Andy the wiring is very neat and tidy, keep the pictures coming.

 

George.

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Hi Ray

Very nice coming along great. That engine i think is made from the Match box model similar to the one I made for GTD.Just over a week to get it all finished??? Will we see you this week end.

 

Peter.

 

PS Andy POLLYESTER I think you will have to start wearing a tin hat if Poly is around, also what am I now?

Hi Ray, just a read and catch up it is coming on really well, you must be very pleased with progress so far.

 

Just a quicky to Peter, sorry bud I missed that last comment, I guess YOU must be a GILLIESTER??????? wot????????? G I L L I E S T E R !!!!!!

 

As for Polly I am staying well clear from no on, hahahhahheheheheeee

 

Andy :sungum:

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Arch bridges abound on the North Cornwall, so my quick trawl through the Irwell Press book confirms. St Thomas's Road Bridge at Launceston is very offset, and steeply inclined across the railway. Padstow opened in 1899, when there were still very few motor vehicles of any sort - roads were not constructed to consider artic lorries, so corners could be tighter, as many still are in the West Country. Maybe use the arch slightly less obliquely - and face with stone, of course.

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