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76084 - High Speed Testing Successful


Andy Y

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High Speed Testing Successful

 

The shareholders attending yesterday’s Annual General Meeting were informed that Riddles Standard 4 2-6-0 number 76084 successfully ran at 60 mph completing 3 runs at this speed on the Great Central Railway on Monday 20 October 2014 with no ill effects noticed.

 

Such testing was one of the reasons for 76084 visiting the GCR so that the locomotive could be tested at speed prior to a return to mainline running. The 76084 Locomotive Company Limited, owners of the Standard 4, launched a ‘Go Mainline’ Appeal at their Annual General Meeting last year. Funding for the first of the three necessary technologies, Train Protection and Warning System (TPWS), has already been raised and the Company have moved onto fundraising for the second technology, On-board Train Monitoring and Recording or OTMR for which approximately half of the necessary funding has been raised.

 

In parallel with the installation of these mandatory rail network safety systems the suitability of running at prolonged periods at relatively high speeds has to be established. Standing still in a scrapyard for over 14 years may well have made tender wheel bearings, for instance, somewhat fragile and incapable of withstanding sustained high speed.

 

The GCR with its similarities to the actual mainline was an ideal place to test 76084 under strict safety conditions. Indeed, the GCR has safety notices wherever the public might access their system to warn of up to 75 mph running day or night. 60163 Tornado was similarly tested prior to her mainline certification on the GCR. The GCR management preferred to use the Down line (Leicester North to Loughborough) so before the speed trials were undertaken 76084 was turned at Quorn & Woodhouse – a first for the loco in preservation.

 

The runs and measurements were witnessed by personnel from our Vehicle Assessment Body who gave a thumbs up at the end of the day.

76084 has now returned to the North Norfolk Railway .

 

The Shareholders were also informed that 76084 has been allocated a TOPS number. She will be identified on the TOPS system as 98484.

 

 

The Company commissioned a small number of photographers and videographers to record the high speed runs. This footage can be found on the Company’s Flickr site here and will be included in a ‘Locomotive Profile’ DVD showing restoration work, first movement under her own power and action from the 3 heritage railways she has so far performed on. It will be released on 1 December 2014 at a cost of £15 plus P&P available from our website.

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My recollection was that the Pacifics and some 73xxx had chimes. When I was about 8-y-o there was a train in the distance around bedtime which was normally hauled either a Black 5 or 73xxx. I could almost tell which of the regular locos was on whilst lying in bed by the sound it made and its whistle. Fooled me completely one night when it had a Jubilee.

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I am slightly baffled by the desire for a relatively small locomotive to gain main line certification. I don't believe the Standard 4MT Moguls could handle much more than eight carriage long trains (?), and probably not even that many when fully loaded. For most main line excursions the trains need to be quite long and fully loaded to make enough money to be worth doing. So what am I missing here with why this one is being put up for such certification?

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Given the loco was restoerd at Ian Storey's workshops in Northumberland and his association with the NYMR this is a possible destination for her. She would be ideal for the Whitby turns which means she needs this gear, and once you have it you might as well go the whole hog. 76079 did a good turn in Scotland on the Jacobite a while back.

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Because they can?

 

But it also costs quite a bit of money too, as I understand it. However, 'Ed-farms' reply re Whitby runs on the NYMR has perhaps answered why they might be able to justify the cost.

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I am slightly baffled by the desire for a relatively small locomotive to gain main line certification. I don't believe the Standard 4MT Moguls could handle much more than eight carriage long trains (?), and probably not even that many when fully loaded. For most main line excursions the trains need to be quite long and fully loaded to make enough money to be worth doing. So what am I missing here with why this one is being put up for such certification?

The 'Pocket Rocket' was a very versatile class, the BR1b tendered examples were masters of the Waterloo to Basingstoke, and Bournemouth semi-fasts, their superb acceleration from the many stops was a definite advantage even outperforming their 4-6-0 cousins which were originally meant for that work, they coped with ten coaches with ease.

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Is this not the loco that is now North Norfolk Railway based? There was talk from them of having a loco (possibly this one) mainline certified for use on the Sheringham - Cromer line, in a similar fashion th the NYMR use of the Whitby line.

 

Stewart

 

Thats what I was thinking. Ian Storey might have had links to the NYMR in the past but his engines are not there often now. 44767 George Stephenson made a visit after returning and now 76084 has already returned to the North Norfolk Raiway, where its just as likely his collection could be based. This railway is really making a go of things with the desire to use what it has but also get agreements in place. Expect 76084 to go under the care of WCRC, as the railway obviously has links to the company given the agreements made for Mayflower to be based there when not needed mainline. Additionally Stewart is right in suggesting that there seems to be a concerted push to use part of the 'mainline' to extend the NNR following on from the agreement with the NYMR over Whitby.

 

It seems that smaller mainline engines are being sought by preserved railways to extend their routes over lines that link to the Network. Whitby operation has shown that procedures and operations can take place, so long as they are removed from the main operational network by some distance.

 

The use of the standard 4 makes mainline work around the Fens possible given its route availability, but it all depends what the tour promotors have in mind and what is possible. Either way, it seems 76084 is a Norfolk based engine for the time being.

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Such smaller locos would be useful on the Cambrian, if the ERTMS issues are ever solved. I believe that the Ian Riley 76XXX was used in the past, axle load restrictions on structures like Barmouth Bridge come to mind.

76079 was also used on the seasonal 'Dawlish Donkey' a few years ago hauling 7 MK1sI From Exeter to Paignton?

 

post-1161-0-06193600-1415885957_thumb.jpg

 

post-1161-0-85844000-1415885999_thumb.jpg

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Is this not the loco that is now North Norfolk Railway based? There was talk from them of having a loco (possibly this one) mainline certified for use on the Sheringham - Cromer line, in a similar fashion th the NYMR use of the Whitby line.

The RSSB Deviations Register (pdf) appears to show that permission has been granted for the B12:

 

Operation of the following preserved steam locomotive from

Sheringham East Network Rail / North Norfolk Railway

(NNR) boundary to Cromer bufferstops Platform 2, with

diversionary route to Cromer Platform 1 for contingency

purposes.

 

Note that:

• There is no run round facility at Cromer;

• Movements from the NNR must be routed to Platform 2 at

Cromer and the route set throughout;

• There is limited scope for parallel movements – only at

Cromer;

• Sheringham East Network Rail (NR) boundary is protected

by rail stop devices vice Train Protection and Warning

System (TPWS);

• Working of single lines by Pilotman is currently

implemented for all Cromer to NNR movements London and

North Eastern Railway (LNER).

 

B12 class steam locomotive No. 8572

 

TOPS No. 98472

 

Painted No. 8572

 

Class / Power Classification 4

 

Wheel Arrangement 4-6-0

 

Maximum Speed 25 mph.

 

Chris

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The use of the standard 4 makes mainline work around the Fens possible given its route availability, but it all depends what the tour promotors have in mind and what is possible. Either way, it seems 76084 is a Norfolk based engine for the time being.

Not totally inappropriate, given its design relationship with the Ivatt Doodlebug, a M&GN staple in the latter days.

 

The Nim.

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I am slightly baffled by the desire for a relatively small locomotive to gain main line certification. I don't believe the Standard 4MT Moguls could handle much more than eight carriage long trains (?), and probably not even that many when fully loaded. For most main line excursions the trains need to be quite long and fully loaded to make enough money to be worth doing. So what am I missing here with why this one is being put up for such certification?

Then again, there are two mainline certified panniers and 1450 was likewise a 'mainline' loco at one point.

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