Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/08/22 in Blog Comments

  1. Raffish, my new English word of the day As for his suit, I was looking to break the monotony of brown and dark grey suits and found a photo of James Inglis inspecting facilities at Fishguard ("Edwardian Enterprise", p.23) . He is in a very light suit, cream or sand, so I copied that - no other comparison intended between the raffish type and this very reputable engineer. Yes the Henley photo is not your average commuters. In fact I have been wondering whether the middle class - which began expanding in the 19th century - could generally afford the very elaborate dresses we see in representations of Victorian and Edwardian fashion such as that below. Source: Extract from a longer timeline, made from historical fashion plates etc. Widely shared on the web, original full images on Imgur here.
    8 points
  2. As to shading, I will repeat what I have said before, (sorry),. Wargamming figures are usually painted with heavy shading and a black wash to bring out the detail, and as such they look great for Waterloo in 1815, We however want our figures ready for the 18:15 from Waterloo and despite what people might think Waterloo Station in the rush hour is not like facing Napoleon's Army. Someone whose name I have forgotten, sorry, who is a very good figure painter says highlighting in 4mm is not necessary. Note: you will notice I do not do close ups as close as Mikkel when showing my figures.
    8 points
  3. Informative and amusing - all very nicely done: believable people in a believable place, you can almost overhear their conversation.
    8 points
  4. next time you're on a platform, stand about two coach lengths away from the other people. I guess the colours of their clothes will be a bit muted, you'll see shadows where their eyes are, and maybe under their chins, a beard or moustache might show, as will hair colour & hat if applicable, but beyond that...? I know, coaches are longer these days :)
    7 points
  5. One thing I have found with any kind of magnifier, (and common sense tells me that I should have realised) is to always ensure that you set the angle of the lens at ninety degrees to your line of vision for every job. Otherwise you do get a wobbly or distorted view whilst working.
    6 points
  6. Thanks Charlie. The fact that Modelu figures don't need priming is a nice bonus. In fact I think Modelu could use it more actively as a selling point. For beginners or those who don't prioritize figures it makes life easier, and for those who enjoy figure painting it means one less layer of paint (primer). This is a particular advantage in faces, where you only want 1-2 thin layers to avoiding clogging up/smoothing out features. Good point about the depth of field. The lamp I have allows the glass to be exchanged, so it is tempting to try out the greater strength but perhaps I should see if I can try before I buy. I've also thought about head glasses but have gotten used to the lamp type and like working under that because the light is so good. Yes, I think in many model railway situations you don't need more than that - for 4mm at least, not sure about larger scales. Caption: Commuters at Slough Station, Berkshire, c 1907. Getty images, embedding permitted. The challenge is if you want to go up really close e.g. with a camera, that's when some sort of indication of eyes etc is needed to avoid the "blob face" look. Caption: Sarah Bernhardt at St Pancras Station, London, 28 July 1894. Getty images, embedding permitted.
    6 points
  7. When I am painting figures, or anything small, I have both elbows on the table, the figure in one hand, paintbrush in the other, and I have my little fingers touching. Although this might not anchor them rigidly, it does mean that the brush and figure wobble in unison.
    6 points
  8. Many thanks Dave. My new magnifier lamp helps a lot, though it turns out I mistakenly bought one which magnifies x3 rather than x8 It has light diodes in a circle though, which gives very good light. The question of course is how far we want/need to go with face details on 4mm figures. Most of it cannot in fact be seen with the naked eye, raising the broader question: How much should we be doing for the sake of the camera alone? Thanks! The Modelu site says they don't need cleaning (see almost invisible text at the top here: https://www.modelu3d.co.uk/painting/). So the above figures have not been cleaned at all as an experiment - and sure enough, the Vallejo paints go on very well. Rubbing them does not remove any paint at all.
    6 points
  9. No, that’s a different brand of model figures…
    5 points
  10. All the first class ladies have gloves on, and most appear to be thick leather ones so that could add to the size. The third class ladies probably do as well although it is difficult to see from Andy Stadden's web site, and I have not dug mine out to have a look.
    5 points
  11. Wonderful! Super painting and excellent story telling to go with it. I firmly believe that a model railway is always a great opportunity for a little theatre and you do it so well. A masterclass!
    5 points
  12. ...you may be better off with x3. I found higher power magnifiers had a very limited depth of field so the object of my attention went in and out of focus with each wobble of my hand - it reminded me of the "fishing boat bobbing sea" (Dylan Thomas). Anchoring the object to an immovable something or other would assist but I gave up on it and stuck with 3x. I'm with ChrisN on the difference between 1815 and the 18:15 and although railway modelling sometimes feels like a war game battlefield, my station master brandishes no more than a pocket watch (but duly picked out in Vallejo's gunmetal colour).
    5 points
  13. (just noticed the gauze falling off of a fan unit!)
    4 points
  14. I wasn't trying to be over critical, the figures really do look the part, it was only a couple which as I said were in cruel close up and probably won't be noticeable in reality where the hands looked large to me and those are not wearing gloves in the photos above. I did have a good look through Andy Staddens website, the figures he produces are truly impressive and I was rather hoping to find some suitable for the thirties and forties among the range, as I would definitely be getting out the debit card. My bank manager is glad that I no longer collect military models, that's for sure.
    4 points
  15. Indeed - a new skill, being learnt by younger men. No-one has grown old in the business yet. I agree that your fashion plate timeline shows the haut ton. (Let that be your new English phrase of the day!) You're more likely to see middle as well as working class styles in some of the early films - tramcar rides etc., which also have the advantage of mostly being in provincial towns.
    4 points
  16. So he does! Perhaps I should re-purpose him. Having looked at photos of early GWR motor car drivers today all have moustaches, none have greying beards. Perhaps a generational thing.
    4 points
  17. Your GWR bus driver looks rather like Captain EJ Smith of the Titanic. Hope that's not an omen!
    4 points
  18. Your two Railway Magazine chaps never did write up their piece, more's the pity! They're both too young to be Charles Rous-Marten; I did think the fellow in the yellow suit looked raffishly colonial. The chap in the brown suit could well be C.J. Allen, though, on day release from the Great Eastern. As I'm sure you're aware, your colourisation of Henley is a screen-grab from this film: https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-arrival-of-train-load-of-visitors-at-henley-station-1899-online which does depict the opening day of the Henley Regatta, so the passengers are not typical in that they are (a) overwhelmingly first-class and (b) done up for a day out. The Slough crowd is, I feel, much more typical for a town station in the south of England. (Though I doubt they are commuters - they'll have bought singles or returns, rather than being season-ticket holders.) As you've no doubt noticed, they're all in muted shades of grey...
    4 points
  19. Many thanks Chris. I couldn't resist adding some captions to the photos, though it wasn't really the plan. None of these figures can compete with your Jean Floret de Cauliflower though, surely one of the most memorable figures ever to have appeared on a model railway! I see he is also your avatar now, that nuisance gets everywhere. Thank you Ian, I think a slight bit of highlighting like that does help, e.g. to bring out folds in the clothing. It will be interesting to see how you find the Modelu figures in 2mm scale. I think the two ranges - Stadden and Modelu - each have their strengths. The former have character, the latter have the ultra-realistic features including poses. I suppose it's like impessionism vs realism in the arts. Here's a Modelu and Andrew Stadden line-up: Never thought of that Chris, must give it a try. I'm finding my Windsor & Newton series 7 "00" brush invaluable for the face details (not the range marked "Miniature", I have no experience with those).
    4 points
  20. Mikkel, As others have said those figures are beautifully painted. If I hadn’t known I would have assumed that they were 7mm scale or larger. When I paint my 2mm scale figures I tend to have a palette of two shades of the same colour so that I can use the (slightly) lighter shade as a highlight. I really must see if I can get some Modelu figures in 2mm scale as all of those currently on Modbury are Andrew Stadden ones. Ian
    4 points
  21. Very nicely painted. I especially like the buttons on the moustacheless porter's waistcoat and the bus driver's beard. It's interesting that the modelu ones don't need priming with acrylics.
    4 points
  22. Gorgeous. You have got the eyes and lips perfectly, very difficult to get right. I know exactly what you mean about Andy Staddens ladies. They have something about them, a flow to the figure. He has an eye for it that is truly artistic.
    4 points
  23. Excellent characters @Mikkel although I am also not sure my Henley-on-Thames platforms will ever be that busy. I think the Henley photo was from the Regatta shortly after the canopy was built in 1904.
    3 points
  24. Some very nice figure painting, Mikkel and brought to life by your inimitable story-telling. I recall that I tackled some of the issue you mentioned about holders and magnifiers some time ago and I have now found them in a blog post from 2015 My title was "Figure Painting - First Steps" but I never seem to have taken any more steps! Too many distractions elsewhere, as I flit from one thing to another. That 'Model Craft' universal work holder that I mentioned was very good for holding figures during painting and has a comfortable wooden handle. I also use an illuminated magnifier and agree with others that x3 is a useful strength. My version, however, has an additional smaller area of high magnification, which is great for examining the finer details. If that style is not available, you could perhaps add a small supplementary lens over part of the main lens. The combination of lenses worked well for me. I'll see if I can restore the figures to that post, as they may be helpful. It's clear that we can expect no more 'restoration' in older posts but I have been restoring images to quite a number of my posts, mainly in the Broad Gauge blog, so far. Mike
    3 points
  25. Mikkel, your figures are wonderfully done... as always! (BTW, did you notice that the carriages in the photos at Henley and St. Pancras don't appear to have any lining? We know its there, somewhere, but it just doesn't seem to show up.)
    3 points
  26. All I really learned from this is that we're overdue the return of the bustle to high fashion. #Interesting/Thought-Provoking indeed!
    3 points
  27. Thank you Kit, I think positioning a couple of figures in conversation works quite well visually. Next time I must remember some luggage though! Thanks Wolf, I think scale may also affect whether shading works or not, it can look good on 7mm figues I think. Also has to do with the skill of the painter of course, I just can't seem to make washes work on my figures, having tried both bought-in and DIY ones. Thanks Chris, you are the expert on Victorian dress of course! Regarding Edwardian corsets, I read that the "S-bend" corset became common in the 1900s. But they would perhaps have been more noticeable than seen on these figures? You may well have a point regarding pub lunches. If Wikipedia is to be believed even "Ploughman's lunch" is a 1950s term promoted by the Cheese Bureau!
    3 points
  28. Creative and amusing . I note Modelu figures for not need priming but do they need rinsing or degreasing , please ? im about to paint a batch and your item is timely and informative.
    3 points
  29. I use pens from Faber Castell and Prismacolour. They have a good range but I sometimes feel I should buy a new colour for each building. I colour the edges of window and door openings from the inside in case of slips. For corners I fold them right back and run the pen down sideways, but sometimes have to run it in the groove. I sometimes am able to do bricked corners and leave a gap at the mortar courses. (I am working in OO.)
    3 points
  30. A very nice set of painted figures Mikkel. You are right about the lady with the bustle, I dated her to the 1880s. She does appear to be the only one of the Modelu figures to be wearing a corset though. It is nice to see that the folk of Farthing are as lively as ever. It is a shame about those two going down the pub instead of researching wagon liveries, it would have sac=ved you so much time. (Did pubs do meals in the Edwardian times? Perhaps it was just a liquid lunch, which is where the confusion about red and grey wagons came from.) I shall have to see if we have Tessa or something similar. I have used double sided tape on card which is sort of alright but is not perfect. (I am not supposed to be painting figures at the moment. I only have about 50 to do, and added another one to the list today.)
    3 points
  31. I think that you've made a truly impressive job of painting those figures and I have to agree that less is more when it comes to shading. I've never been convinced with the dark wash some put onto figures. It seems to work on fantasy figures but not on humans. Those hand carved figures are beautifully done and from an artist's point of view are very life-like. The only criticism I would offer is the proportion of some of the women's hands, they look bigger than mine! It's probably not noticeable except in cruel close ups though.
    3 points
  32. New single piece body print:
    3 points
  33. Three photos showing the life of RR 64 taken from roughly the same angle. Original design: Converted to 0-6-2T with original boiler: New boiler raised up by approximately 8" based upon the change in handrail position. I think the increased length of an A class boiler will have been incorporated at both ends (possible because of the sloping grate of the A firebox). A K class boiler couldn't have gone backwards because the firebox grate was flat and the rear driven axle is in the way. Only 64 recieved the bigger boiler; I have a 1922 photo of 65 with a low pitched boiler
    2 points
  34. except now the same effect is achieved with implants...
    2 points
  35. Nice work Mike, - that particular Tri-comp is a favourite of mine too.
    2 points
  36. Whatever the reason, it's of great comfort to small-scale modellers that lining is often invisible
    2 points
  37. Thanks Dana, as usual the figure names are drawn from Dickens, although I can never remember who is called what so need to check to ensure continuity In the Henley photo, perhaps the lining was lost with colourizarion, or maybe doesn't show on the original film.
    2 points
  38. Hi Graham ...oh dear! When the images were lost on RMweb a few months ago, I eventually attempted to reload the missing pictures from my files here....but clearly not that: my apologies. I don't think I wrote much about it but I did have photos of the unpainted sides (only) which I posted again above. There isn't a lot to say about them. The artwork for the Silhouette cutter was created as DXF files in layers - the outer layer (1) being the panelling: the next layer (2) the main side which was scored on the Silhouette to represent the planking and with complete cuts for the openings for the side and drop lights of the grooms' compartment together with the louvres to the horses' compartment. The next layer (3) had oversized cut outs to accomodate the glazing and louvres and the last layer (4) is the "interior" such as it is. I discount the panelling layer as a full layer since it contributes little to overall stability of the assembly. The material is all Bristol board coated both sides with shellac prior to cutting on the machine (I didnt take pictures step by step). The layers were laminated using regular pva "white" glue, brushed on, and the layers set up on the turn-under former (pictured below) which is no more than a board in the shape of a carriage side with a straightedge at the base so it's pretty similar to the method for forming the roof except that simple weights (my grandfather's "gravity clamps") do the job. The left hand picture is the whole former - long enough for a 60' coach in 7mm (some hope!) and the right hand picture is the end elevation of the former showing its shape. Once again, apologies for the wild goose chase - I've been on a few myself, only to find those annoying "placeholders" and no picture. Best regards - Kit
    2 points
  39. Thanks Dave for your kind comments - much appreciated. Yes, the GWR (like other companies) seem to have employed subtle roof shapes and in some variety, so one former will do horseboxes in the early diagrams but later diagrams will need another - thankfully, the formers don't actually take very long to make as the arcs are in a single plane. Much more difficult would be, for instance, the American style MET coaching stock with the ends rounded in both longitudinal and transverse directions. The overall roof thickness at just under 1mm would, I think, make the system viable for 4mm scale.
    2 points
  40. I built another one, although with a slightly different approach. For this one I used the cheaper Bachmann B4 bogies (no pickups) and cut the ends of a Bachmann chassis so I could use their close coupling system. I printed my centre chassis section and kept the body ends removable. I then fitted battery powered LEDs with a latching reed switch operated by a magnetic wand. I wasn't sure how long the battery would last so I didn't add the chassis lighting, but, it came out really nicely:
    2 points
  41. Very interesting Mike, a truly hybrid model. Very clever as always and a nice result. Fortunately I have enough stuff that the grandchildren can use without touching what I have made.
    1 point
  42. Thanks Mikkel. This video explains what old fashioned carpenters/joiners call a "scratch stock". Usually made in house, they were used for cutting simple mouldings in wood. https://www.finewoodworking.com/2008/07/31/how-to-make-a-scratch-stock There are one or two things to note about the cabinet scraper version I made. 1) there are two sets of teeth on the one illustrated, only one set is necessary (I should have pointed that out in the original post). 2) the teeth are angled so that as they cut into the wood, they also move sideways slightly to form the characteristic angled louvre rather than just slats - if you see what I mean.... and 3) I start with a small toolmaker's clamp on the scraper so that it's held against the edge of the wood, hopefully to a straight line - a similar "fence" is built into the scratch stocks illustrated in the video. Once the scraper has cut into the wood a bit, I take off the clamp and the scraper follows the lines it's already cut.: it's one of those things that you really have to try for yourself, you'll quickly discover the ins and outs of it. The wood I use is jellutong (I think it's also known as bass wood, particularly in US). It's favoured by pattern makers, has a close, straight grain and is very workable. Left: the scraper (used for No 88's louvres) with a toolmaker's clamp attached. Middle: the scraper beginning to form the louvres (in a bit of mdf to illustrate how it works - not suitable for finished work!) and Right: another corner of the same scraper with a more traditional moulding shape in it -used for building cornice in 7mm scale.
    1 point
  43. What you have done should be recoverable and improved. Try scraping all the ballast off the top of the sleepers (small screwdriver) and filling in any areas where ballast is thin or missing. Once dry apply a thickish wash of dark brown paint (enamel or acrylic - I only use the latter) all over the ballast, sleepers and rail sides, wipe the top of the rail as you go, including the inner edge of the rail top for good electrical pick-up. Have a look at photos of ballasted old rail, sleepers and ballast tend to be all roughly the same colour. Don't be tempted to pick-out the rail sides in bright rust colour - this will look awful!
    1 point
  44. This looks very good and I think the Silhouette cutter works better with card than with plasticard, where it can only cut very thin sheet. Your roof moulding is a real tour de force I wrote about the Dean clasp brake at https://www.rmweb.co.uk/blogs/entry/19076-broad-gauge-mail-coach-part-5/ The important thing to recognise is that the pivots work in two planes.
    1 point
  45. No need to use paint. Get a pack of coloured felt markers, these work well. The edges are easier to colour before assembly though. John
    1 point
  46. Impressive looking wagon. . The roof forming method is very clever, these subtle roof shapes are so difficult to get right but that looks spot on.
    1 point
  47. Thanks Mikkel. That’s a really smart bit of kit, I didn’t know you could get one of those. It’s a good price so I’m tempted to try one. The different spacing options could be very handy.
    1 point
  48. What a beauty already. A couple of days ago I was in a war gaming shop (they have good modelling stuff) and saw this rivet roller with interchangeable blades from Green Stuff World. Yours is much neater of course, but your results make me think I might give this one a go: https://www.greenstuffworld.com/en/cutting-tools/1371-hobby-rivet-maker-planes-military.html
    1 point
  49. Well, it is an exercise in thinking about scale and what we take as being normal. For instance those driving wheels would be 5' in 4mm OO for which they were made. However they are thicker than a gibson wheel, so I wouldn't use them for EM. However they are only a OO wheel insofar as it says so on the bag. Machine out the centre and they just become a component, in this case a 1m driving wheel of a realistic thickness at 1/50 th. Really a case of thinking about scale from a different direction.
    1 point
This leaderboard is set to London/GMT+01:00
×
×
  • Create New...