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coachmann

Oswestry in 0 gauge? Selling up instead....

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All very tempting as I haven't started laying Track yet.

 

 

NOTE TO SELF. :O

 

 

DON'T KEEP LOOKING IN HERE. :no:  :no: :no:   :sungum: 

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All very tempting as I haven't started laying Track yet.

 

 

NOTE TO SELF. :O

 

 

DON'T KEEP LOOKING IN HERE. :no:  :no: :no:   :sungum: 

Do keep looking Andy. You've done 0 gauge and worn the tea-shirt so you will be useful!     :biggrin_mini2:

Edited by coachmann
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Your 6' looks rather narrow. Not sure why as I have always assumed that Peco was set up to give the correct spacing.

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Your 6' looks rather narrow. Not sure why as I have always assumed that Peco was set up to give the correct spacing.

I had a conversation with some of the 7mm brigade on Saturday at Cradley Heath about using Peco 7 mm turnouts.

 

They were saying that you do need to insert a short length of track between the two diverging roads of the Peco turnouts that form a crossover.

 

I suppose a Templot printout would give you the correct spacing.

 

Gordon Gravett's 7 mm Modelling Part two quotes 80 mm between track centres on double track.

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Hi coachmann.

 

The curved one, in my opinion: it looks so much better.  From a practical point of view, though, you've also much less chance of any bufferlocking when you're shunting - though obviously that depends on what couplings you use and how you intend to operate the layout.

 

Rod

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Excuse me being a pedant, but quality of workmanship aside, it won't be true working valve motion.

 

Even if they put a proper crank axle onto the loco, it will be driving from the crank end and not the pistons, will not notch up and I very much doubt that the reversing lever will change to the opposite end of the quadrant prior to a change of direction. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_angel.gif

I am a long way from my Jubilee though there is a crank on the driven axle, but i cannot ascertain if the valve gear is "driven" from cranks.

 

And yes, the latest models from both Lee Marsh and Masterpiece do have a representation of reserval. On the Jubilee this occurs as the loco starts off in the opposite dircetion so I suppose the timing is slightly delayed.

 

I understand your pedantry, quite reasonable as everything moving on electric steam locos is backwards!

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Any Gauge 0-ers any experience of Masterpiece Models locos? They're a bit out of my price range but their 38XX 2-8-0 looks smashing. I remember the pleasure I got out of watching the 00 Hornby model.

I have been pestering Pete W for years now, and when I saw him at Telford this year he showed me a box of a very nearly ready kit of an 38xxx ( 2884 ). So hopefully we are not far off production, I love the 38xx's and I will be first in the queue when they finally appear.

 

Martyn.

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Still lurking which is BAD NEWS for my wallet, hahaha.

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Still lurking which is BAD NEWS for my wallet, hahaha.

Only a handful of my 4mm locos were ever fitted with DCC sound and run. So for me 0 gauge and far fewer models is easy.

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To clarify the representation of inside motion (inside cylinders and valve gear). The following basic options are available in Gauge O:

 

1. Bare minimum - a few strips to represent the slide bars under the front of the boiler. Connoisseur Models sometimes has this feature, which is quite good on the Jinty.

 

2. Good representation but static - David Andrews' kits include the parts but there is no crank on the driven axle. His Midland Compound is typical of this level of detail. David recommends soldering the parts up once installed. The driven axle simply rotates inside the soldered mass of parts.

 

3. Working crank(s) and eccentrics using Laurie Griffin's kits. This entails fixing a crank or two on the driven axle with Loctite and then cutting the axle. I have the kit for the Midland Compound, this model is third on my to do list. Laurie's web site includes videos of various inside motions at lgminiatures.co.uk

 

4. The South Korean built "museum quality" limited run models, with excellent representation. Given the healthy competition between manufacturers expect these models to become even more realistic in the future.

 

You pays your money and makes your choice!

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I think that tracks running out onto an external covered shelf might be a good feature so that the shed is assumed to be off stage....

Isn't that a bit of a risk to have your most valuable items on a shelf which could become exposed to the elements.  IIRC you did have problems with the mark 1 external track under plastic corrugated roofing.

 

if you were to use a shelf it should be well insulated and sealed which might impact access to retrieve stuck engines.

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Excuse me being a pedant, but quality of workmanship aside, it won't be true working valve motion.

 

Even if they put a proper crank axle onto the loco, it will be driving from the crank end and not the pistons, will not notch up and I very much doubt that the reversing lever will change to the opposite end of the quadrant prior to a change of direction. :angel:

 

I have seen true working motion in 0 gauge by one Clarey Edwards who built things as close as he could manage for 0 gauge live steam (including chain drive for the Bulleid pacific). However the Gresley conjugated gear gave problems. Clarey said. It was a bit iffy full size but scaled down lost some rigidity which made matters worse.

As far a electric driven models go people have made the gear operational in that it could be notched up or reversed usually on outside valve gear so others could see how clever they have been. This is usually done by those who enjoy the challenge. However to me the difficulty in building working crew rather negates the effect.

On those locos where the boiler is high enough to see into the frames some stimulation of the valve gear and con rods etc does avoid the empty space look of some models. If it can be made to move so much the better.

Not that one can see it very easily when romping round with a train. It tends to be more visible when moving slowly in station limits such as a run round.

The sharpie shown in my earlier post does have moving inside motion (the work of Chris Basten who built it for me as I was rather busy with other things at the time)

Don

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To clarify the representation of inside motion (inside cylinders and valve gear). The following basic options are available in Gauge O:

 

1. Bare minimum - a few strips to represent the slide bars under the front of the boiler. Connoisseur Models sometimes has this feature, which is quite good on the Jinty.

 

2. Good representation but static - David Andrews' kits include the parts but there is no crank on the driven axle. His Midland Compound is typical of this level of detail. David recommends soldering the parts up once installed. The driven axle simply rotates inside the soldered mass of parts.

 

3. Working crank(s) and eccentrics using Laurie Griffin's kits. This entails fixing a crank or two on the driven axle with Loctite and then cutting the axle. I have the kit for the Midland Compound, this model is third on my to do list. Laurie's web site includes videos of various inside motions at lgminiatures.co.uk

 

4. The South Korean built "museum quality" limited run models, with excellent representation. Given the healthy competition between manufacturers expect these models to become even more realistic in the future.

 

You pays your money and makes your choice!

 

I have some Finny parts to fit the Dean goods and Duke I have to build. Perhaps these parts will be available from the new owners. Incidentally I have been advised to silver solder the crank axle for strength.

Don

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I have some Finny parts to fit the Dean goods and Duke I have to build. Perhaps these parts will be available from the new owners. Incidentally I have been advised to silver solder the crank axle for strength.

Don

Be very careful with that one.

 

Getting parts up to red heat, if they are dissimilar metals could lead to distortion, especially if the parts you are trying to silver solder are lost wax castings.

 

The last crank axle I made (for a live steamer) was  all steel, secured with loctite and pinned.

 

Then the axle were cut out from between the  respective crank webs.

 

I was having kittens cutting it out as I was worried I'd bend it, but I needn't have worried.

Edited by Happy Hippo
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Be very careful with that one.

 

Getting parts up to red heat, if they are dissimilar metals could lead to distortion, especially if the parts you are trying to silver solder are lost wax castings.

 

The last crank axle I made (for a live steamer) was  all steel, secured with loctite and pinned.

 

Then the axle were cut out from between the  respective crank webs.

 

I was having kittens cutting it out as I was worried I'd bend it, but I needn't have worried.

 

I hope we are not too far off topic, but Loctite is the adhesive recommended by Laurie Griffin.  A pin makes good sense as well.

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Mindful of Paul's comment about getting off topic, I'll try and steer a straighter course!

 

I'm sure that sizes have previously been discussed, perhaps in the Oswestry 4mm thread, but I can't find out how long Larry's train shed that contains the newer version of Oswestry is, and I'm terribly nosy about fellow modeller's sheds.

 

Mine is 14 x 10, but will never see a model railway installed as it's too full of tools and the like.

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Scorpio Models include cast whitemetal dummy inside motion with most of their kits.

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I know I'm coming to this and your previous 4mm thread a bit late, but thought I would highlight a chapter on Oswestry in The Times' book "Mapping the Railways" by Julian Holland and David Spaven. Might be helpful in providing further info or inspiration?

 

Dave

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<snip>    Some temporary dismantling and the attachment of a new stringer started the ball rolling...

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gifWEB Baseboard 1.jpg

 

 

Isn't that part of the area where you cut back the baseboard on the OO version, or have I got the wrong side of the shed?

 

I'm following this with a sense of bewildered learning.....the speed of construction, the speed of destruction, the speed of reconstruction, the interesting and logical comments you present on why each change was made, your legendary paint finishes on the OO stock now set aside. I'm also very impressed by the weather you are enjoying in your part of the world!

Dave

Edited by DIW
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Just keep a spare 1430mm with a dropped baseboard for a model of Victoria Bridge, or have an extension outside.

Won't be long until the first etched brass "R-T-R" sample lands from Korea.

Edited by Cliff Williams
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Still lurking which is BAD NEWS for my wallet, hahaha.

Know exactly how your feeling Andy ...... it's.......so ........temping .............. :scared:  :scared:

 

Larry regarding the comment about six foot for when you come to lay track properly there were three excellent articles in the Modeller over the last couple of month, about getting the correct formation with Peco track I would imagine that it will apply in 7mm. 

 

Just to add to the vote (defo 2nd )

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Larry regarding the comment about six foot for when you come to lay track properly there were three excellent articles in the Modeller over the last couple of month, about getting the correct formation with Peco track I would imagine that it will apply in 7mm. Just to add to the vote (defo 2nd )

Thanks. PGH was on the case a few days ago and gave me recommended 'six-foot' depending on curvature etc. So if I make any mistakes, it's my own fault. 

 

 

Isn't that part of the area where you cut back the baseboard on the OO version, or have I got the wrong side of the shed?

Hi Dave,

 

Yup, it's the part that was cut back on the 00 gauge layout. Now it's been necessary to widen it to accommodate a small 0 gauge goods yard. I think the next job will be to narrow the storage sidings board opposite the widened section, as I hate being hemmed in. I never leave any models in the shed and most of the fiddle yard was never used.

Edited by coachmann

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Maybe you didn't see the new shelf that was built to replace the one with a corrugated clear roof. This is it using glazing material used in conservatories.. Access is simple. This one will be dismantled to become two....One to go back here over the station tracks and the other to go the door end of the shed to cover the motive power yard. Access will be easier with 0 gauge and the cubicles will probably have a fixed glazed cover...

 

attachicon.gifWEB railway shed 1.jpg

 

You may need to ensure the shelf is ventilated. Warm moist air from inside the shed can condense in places like the shelf causing problems. I know of cases where the tracks out of the shed have been boxed in and ventilation was found necessary.

Don

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You may need to ensure the shelf is ventilated. Warm moist air from inside the shed can condense in places like the shelf causing problems. I know of cases where the tracks out of the shed have been boxed in and ventilation was found necessary.

Don

In practice there have had to problems whatsoever since it was built. 

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