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  • RMweb Gold

The missing wall is a Beeching thing.

 

Nick, the interior looks great. The scales part of the weighbridge mechanism was visible inside, in case you're looking for more details to add.

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  • RMweb Gold
7 hours ago, Regularity said:

I think Brian was being humorous about the lack of a wall or roof, Nick... 

 

I did get the joke, Simon. Hence the laughing emoji! 

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  • RMweb Gold
13 hours ago, Brinkly said:

IMG_6108.jpg.f14cc8436ffe2aaf89bc14152455d546.jpg

 

Presumably the desk will go against the back wall, Nick, to make room for the weighing machinery?

 

And you are clearly going to be fitting some illumination, so that we can still see the lovely interior detail, once the front wall and roof are in place?

 

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36 minutes ago, Captain Kernow said:

Presumably the desk will go against the back wall, Nick, to make room for the weighing machinery?

 

And you are clearly going to be fitting some illumination, so that we can still see the lovely interior detail, once the front wall and roof are in place?

 


I wasn’t entirely sure what other bits and bobs would go inside the building, so yes in answer to your question! Although, I’ll need to do a bit of research.

 

I think so re right. Something warm and not too bright. I have drilled a hole in the floor behind the fireplace for the electrical fitters. 

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The standard type of weighing gear on the railway was by Pooleys. On the wall facing the outside weigh table was a window, and behind the window across the length of the wall was the weigh beam.

https://bwlr.co.uk/other-php-html/the-pooley-weighbridge/

We had one in the wagon shop yard for re-taring wagons after repair just like this, the same green column and brass. You just slid weights across the brass beam until it “floated” and read the weight off on the beam scale.

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I knocked together a (very) rough outline of the Pooley machinery linked to by Northroader the other day. Once you fit the roof it almost disappears in the gloom. 

IMG_20200814_071519418_HDR.jpg

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  • RMweb Gold

Mange Tout, Brinkers. 

 

This is providing much in the way of inspiration for my forthcoming 7mm adventure. I intend having a couple of similar buildings so this info is very useful. 

 

Thank you. 

 

Rob. 

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4 hours ago, Tim V said:

Winchcombe weigh house in 1980!

Interesting photos, Tim and I note that the low rail is provided at that location.

 

It seems that not all weighbridges had such rails installed, though, presumably to do with the layout of the location concerned?

 

 

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Just guessing that the rail is there to make sure vehicles are passing over the table square on and roughly symmetrically. By the way, if you’re standing in the weighhouse looking out, the main column of the beam is on your left.

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2 hours ago, Stubby47 said:

The rail could also be to ensure the whole lorry is on the scales , and not half on the ground affecting the recorded weight.

As if!

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9 hours ago, Tim V said:

Winchcombe weigh house in 1980!

Winchcombe 15 March 1980 OM1 192-001.jpg

 

 

Excellent picture Tim, many thanks.  I think I need to revisit the height of the chimney though, it appears I may have one or two courses too many?

 

877640051_EndElevation-Window.JPG.e2139977171e27b17259e34a0e95362b.JPG 

 

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  • 1 month later...
On 31/07/2019 at 08:46, Brinkly said:

Mary Tavy was very similar to Coryton. The buildings are almost identical. @Harlequin

 

IMG_0450.JPG.6ad2b64f74f6e118d02e47e741426ed0.JPG

The siding itself was beyond the end of the platform. Just a simple siding and trap, no kick-back.

 

IMG_0451.JPG.1d9c17869a3c03bd35f5d6938783849f.JPG

 

Was Mary Tavy a bigger station to begin with, and/or reduced in size?

 

If I'm looking at the right station(?), this older map suggests there used to be a few more sidings.

https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=18&lat=50.59021&lon=-4.12219&layers=178&b=1

 

image.png

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On 16/10/2020 at 22:53, bgman said:

Brinkers dear chap.....Where are you ?

 

Hello!


I am here, but haven't any modelling time since returning to work in September. I have a Year 6 class this year, and they are very far behind due to lockdown. Some of them did nothing at all between March and September... 


Anyway, half term starts next Friday at 3:30! So hopefully I'll be able to do some modelling again in between ripping up carpet and repainting upstairs (ha!). 

 

Cheers,


Nick.

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18 minutes ago, Brinkly said:

I am here, but haven't any modelling time since returning to work in September

 

YEY !

 

I assumed that may have been the case mate, enjoy some down-time if you can and make the most of Half Term.

 

G

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Good show!  This is one area that I know something about.  Otherwise I learn of places or layouts representing somewhere I know nothing of!:(

       Brian

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On 16/10/2020 at 21:16, KeithMacdonald said:

 

Was Mary Tavy a bigger station to begin with, and/or reduced in size?

 

If I'm looking at the right station(?), this older map suggests there used to be a few more sidings.

https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=18&lat=50.59021&lon=-4.12219&layers=178&b=1

 

image.png

 

Hello!

 

Marytavy is an interesting case. When the LSWR had running rights from Lydford to Plymouth, the GWR installed the second platform and passing loop to enable a more frequent service. However, this was a relatively short-lived piece of Launceston branch infrastructure. 

 

Once the LSWR had completed their line from Lydford to Plymouth, the GWR removed the passing loop (1890ish). The signalling was removed at the same time, with the signal box assigned a new role as a goods 'lock-up':  a ground frame installed to work the siding. All traffic was dealt with by the 'down' train, on route to Launceston. 

 

Between the 1930s-50s gradually ran the station down, and, as a wartime economy measure, the station became an unstaffed halt in August 1941; the siding was removed in December 1948. Even before this took place, the station had a bit of a reputation for being down at heel. In the early 1920s, the local GWR authorities had forty fits when they became aware that the 'up' platform had been converted into a rather extensive chicken run by the station staff! After an inspection, the practice ceased! 

 

Building wise the platform was 300ft long, with a structure not dissimilar to the one at Coryton - constructed from local stone, with rather ornate gothic-style arches above the doors and windows. The signal box was a Saxby and Farmer model, similar to the examples at Horrabridge and Bickleigh. Similar to Bickleigh's, a sliding door was fitted below the windows for ease of goods movement: I'm not sure exactly when this took place. At the end of the siding, stood a 42ft loading bank and from what I can tell from late 1940s photographs, the siding went right up to it. So I don't think the siding was shortened during the station's existence. 

The station building and signal box both retained their GWR colours right through to the end, although, it did look rather shabby when the halt closed 1962. 

 

Thanks for your interest and the great map! 

 

Kind regards,

 

Nick.

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4 hours ago, KeithMacdonald said:

Has anyone modelled Launceston? I did try the search facility (that's how I found this topic), but not so much on Launceston itself.

 

https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=18&lat=50.64138&lon=-4.36326&layers=168&b=1

 

image.png.0ed13260f34825ddd903b0b1c51713af.png

 

Yes, seen in Cornwall back in the late 90's. Most of the buildings were make with individual plasticard stones:blink::wacko:. Don't recall seeing after that though so sorry no idea where it is now. S

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On 20/10/2020 at 14:37, KeithMacdonald said:

Has anyone modelled Launceston? I did try the search facility (that's how I found this topic), but not so much on Launceston itself.

 

https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=18&lat=50.64138&lon=-4.36326&layers=168&b=1

 

image.png.0ed13260f34825ddd903b0b1c51713af.png

 

 

I do like the dual station at Launceston. GWR/SR modeller's dream - different companies stock, legitimately running along side eachother. 

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