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Peterborough North

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At last some more progress to report. The first two baseboards on the scenic side arrived last week. Here are a couple of photos of the one which will form the first part of the station complex. The bridge shown is not the correct one - it is just there to show where Spital Bridge will be when it is built.post-98-057053300 1290437068_thumb.jpgpost-98-006413200 1290437103_thumb.jpg

 

Next board is due on 15th December, and all eight are scheduled to be in place by early February. I have not been idle though in the last couple of months, well, not all the time anyway, and after much thought and head scratching I have finally managed to come up with a scheme for one end of the fiddle yard which does not involve anything less than three foot radius curves. At the other end I have at the moment about a yard of 34 inch radius curve, which doesn't bother me much, and one Peco curved turnout, which does, as it is only 30 inch on the inner side. More thought will go into whether I can dispense with that one and still get the length of roads I need. Anyway, here are a couple of pics of the fiddle yard with track very roughly in place. There are 18 through roads, plus a number of dead end roads which will allow me to store short trains without using the main roads. That means that to my surprise I can store nearly all of the named trains seen in 1958, provided I reduce a few to ten coaches. Most were 11 coach formations anyway, so I don't think that is bad.

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Next job is to get the NCE Powerpro down from the loft and installed in its new home. Then we can put in the two bus bars, and make a start on soldering lots of droppers to the bottom of lengths of rail, and then attaching them to the bus bars. Should keep us occupied for quite some time.

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Do you intend using that bridge elsewhere Gilbert?

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Do you intend using that bridge elsewhere Gilbert?

 

No David, it will be surplus to requirements, as will the one which represented Crescent Bridge on the old layout.

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That's going to be an impressive fiddle yard. Are you going to put some slight edges on the base boards to stop any stock falling on the floor? I could see a coach be caught by clothing as someone lent over to rerail / add something.

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That's going to be an impressive fiddle yard. Are you going to put some slight edges on the base boards to stop any stock falling on the floor? I could see a coach be caught by clothing as someone lent over to rerail / add something.

 

Hi Kris,

 

Yes, there will be a fascia on all the boards, both to make it look tidier, but also to stop expensive stuff taking a 3ft 6 dive onto the floor. We're still in the early stages at the moment, but that is definitely on the long list of things to do.

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Hi Kris,

 

Yes, there will be a fascia on all the boards, both to make it look tidier, but also to stop expensive stuff taking a 3ft 6 dive onto the floor. We're still in the early stages at the moment, but that is definitely on the long list of things to do.

This is going to be an absolute necessity Gilbert, particularly for those times when a certain generously proportioned gentleman of our acquaintance pays a visit!

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Well folks, things have moved on. My NCE system is now installed in the new room, with thanks to Geoff Robinson for ensuring that all was done correctly. The result is that the very first loco has moved on the new Peterborough North. Not very far, about two feet actually, but it's a start. :D

 

You may recall that I said earlier that my fiddle yard was so cunningly planned that any train could access any part of it from any running line. Alas, it was pointed out to me that I was mistaken. :( I had checked it all out several times, or so I thought, but the inconvenient truth was that there was no access from the down main to the up side of the fiddle yard. This immediately b******* all of my clever ideas for a timetable sequence. Panic fortunately was short lived, when Geoff pointed out that one facing crossover would solve the problem. A couple of photos should explain what we did. This one is before......

 

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and here is the new arrangement.

 

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Of course this has in turn created a new set of problems as it shortens the approach to the up side yard, but after some head scratching I think I've solved that too. I shall say no more though until we get it laid out properly- I'm not going to tempt fate again.

 

Apart from that, the snow has caused an onset of general modelling. Having seen the way some of the many drivers of large 4x4's round here handle them, or rather don't, on snow and ice, I have decided to stay at home as much as possible till things improve. What to do while cooped up indoors though? Well, over the last few months I have been acquiring Bachmann MK1's both to augment some of my existing rakes to 10 coaches, and to make up a couple of new trains. After a while this resulted in 25 boxes sitting looking at me, all of which needed the roof ribs scraping off, roofs painted to "in service" colour, renumbering and of course weathering. From past experience I know this is not the most interesting of tasks, so it got put off.Isn't it amazing though what happens if one actually faces up to this kind of job? Two days later I have 25 ribless coaches,and several puncture marks in my finger where the small screwdriver I have sharpened to a chisel point for this job has slipped. The whole thing was about as interesting as watching paint dry, which funnily enough is what I'm doing now. The job's well worth doing though IMO, as it makes already very good coaches look even better. Should get the rest of the job done by Friday, which hopefully will be when we start laying and wiring the fiddle yard.

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Lots of progress I'm pleased to say. My good mate Rob Davey arrived just over a week ago, and we have had a really intensive go at it. When I say "we" that mostly means Rob, as soldering was involved, and I don't rate myself at that. A few problems to start with, such as a permanent short when we first switched the system on. That turned out to be down to an insulated rail joiner in the wrong place. Using snap lock connectors also caused some bad language at first, as unfortunately the first few were in very inaccessible places, but practice makes perfect, or nearly, and the air got much less blue as the week progressed. I'm using connectors rather than soldering droppers having worked out that there will be over 700 droppers to be connected to the bus bars. Plenty of opportunity to get solder in the eye or down the arm there, so no thanks.

 

While Rob was cursing, I mean working, I had yet another go at the far end of the fiddle yard.Perseverance brought its just reward, as it now works with nothing less than three foot radius, and that curved point has gone. Just about the whole of the North end of the fiddle yard is now laid, and here are some photos of the finished job.

 

 

 

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Just a few kick back sidings to do now. To give an idea of scale, that is an eight coach rake on the back road, and it doesn't reach the middle of the yard, so my dream of storing two 10 coach rakes in some of the roads looks achievable. Time for tea, then I'll show how the other end of the yard finished up.

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I like it. You are actually doing something. Will be interesting to see how it progresses, especially since I have some strong (probably distorted) memories of changing at Peterborough from the slow Grimsby to Kings Cross train and jumping on a fast express. My Father was a Station Master so he new all the tricks. I also have not so fond memories of rushing like crazy to try to catch the March train that was timed to leave about 1 minute after the train from Grimsby arrived in.

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I like it. You are actually doing something. Will be interesting to see how it progresses, especially since I have some strong (probably distorted) memories of changing at Peterborough from the slow Grimsby to Kings Cross train and jumping on a fast express. My Father was a Station Master so he new all the tricks. I also have not so fond memories of rushing like crazy to try to catch the March train that was timed to leave about 1 minute after the train from Grimsby arrived in.

 

One of the things that has really surprised me when working out the timetable is the total lack of concern that the people who planned it have shown for good connections into local trains. I expected to see departures to the E.Lincs line and the M&GN a few minutes after a down main line train had stopped, but most of the time they don't exist. There are other anomalies too. Why for instance,an all stations stopper to Grimsby at 1400, followed by another just 42 minutes later? I can't imagine a lot of custom for one train at that time of day, let alone two.

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Here's something to brighten up a dull day, and a lot more interesting than photos of the fiddle yard. :D Look, I didn't mean to buy one of these- after all you can get 10 Hornby models for the same price, and I really can't afford it when I think of the other costs involved in this project......but I weakened, and isn't it just a beautiful object?

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Sorry about the quality. I've got as much light on it as I can without using flash, which would not be a good idea in view of the gloss finish on the loco. For once that is highly appropriate, as number 11's regular duty will be hauling the Elizabethan, and that is the kind of finish that both Kings Cross and Haymarket achieved for locos on that duty.

 

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Here is another view, which for some reason has come out better than the close up. It also shows a Coronation articulated twin first which will run in the Talisman set eventually. Rob Davey built this from the Mailcoach kit, and considering that more than one professional modelmaker turned the job down,I reckon he did a fine job. His reward is to build another similar one.

 

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And finally, here is a closer view of the twin set.

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Just read through the whole thread and the layout looks like it makes good use of the space available!

 

The A4 does look very nice indeed. The finish is quite convincing. It's nice to see a glossy finish which looks so much better than the semi-matt so belvoed of the big RTR manufacturers. But I think weathered to represent a clean loco it would amazing!

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Re The Coronation Twin very nice. I built the Tourist Set and if he builds you more he must be mad or something !! The window painting drives you nuts !! perhaps thats why he is building more :D

 

I presume the A4 is one of those new "cheap" ones ? what does it run like and does it go around curves (dimensions) ???

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Re The Coronation Twin very nice. I built the Tourist Set and if he builds you more he must be mad or something !! The window painting drives you nuts !! perhaps thats why he is building more https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_grin.gif

 

I presume the A4 is one of those new "cheap" ones ? what does it run like and does it go around curves (dimensions) ???

 

Yes, it's the Golden Age model. Unfortunately I have nowhere to run it yet, but Tony Wright has run one on Little Bytham and he says that it runs superbly. The instructions say it will not go round anything less than 32 inch radius without some alterations, but Tony tells me that it went round quite a bit less than that on his layout without problems, and I know he has a few sections of 30 inch in his fiddle yard.

 

As to the artic twin, Rob did mention the window painting was a bit stressful, but fortunately for me not so bad as to make him refuse to do another. I need an RS/SO for the West Riding, but I shan't push my luck by asking him to do any more after that. I did look at doing it myself, but not for long!

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Here's something to brighten up a dull day, and a lot more interesting than photos of the fiddle yard. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_grin.gif Look, I didn't mean to buy one of these- after all you can get 10 Hornby models for the same price, and I really can't afford it when I think of the other costs involved in this project......but I weakened, and isn't it just a beautiful object.

 

It certainly is a beautiful object. I live quite close to the North Yorkshire Moors Railway where 60007 Sir Nigel Gresley spends most of its time. It's amazing how many folks, who never knew these things, just stand in absolute awe when 60007 appears, just as we did when any 'streak' appeared, fifty or more years ago. They were and are a timeless classic and continue to thrill as they always have.

 

Cheers

 

Mike

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Re The Coronation Twin very nice. I built the Tourist Set and if he builds you more he must be mad or something !! The window painting drives you nuts !! perhaps thats why he is building more https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_grin.gif

 

I've a Railway Modeller from the early nineties that includes an article by Tony Wright on building one of these twin sets. He actually speaks quite highly of the kit, now THAT is mad!! :P

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Now that's what I call a layout. Lots of room in the fiddle yard, and some nice long sections for 28XXs with 100 wagon coal trains coming up from the Valleys.........

 

Keep up the excellent and inspirational work.

 

Note to self - remember to consider a large layout room when searching for new house in Spring:D

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Only 11 days since I said I'd post some more photos of the fiddle yard "after tea". Obviously other things have intervened. I've succeeded in laying out the other end of the yard with nothing less than 3 foot radius, but that end will be the last bit to be laid. Pictures of fiddle yards aren't very inspiring, so I won't post more photos unless anyone asks me to do so. However, I do have another very nice bit of rolling stock, which I have decided is my Christmas present to myself.

 

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This was built for me by John Houlden using Rupert Brown's (RDEB kits) superb etches, plus lots of MJT bits, and some scratchbuilding. It represents the triplet set which was rebuilt in 1957 for the Northumbrian, and not surprisingly, that is where it is going to be running. I love these triplet sets anyway, but they also have the considerable advantage that they come out 6 inches shorter than three Mk1's, so I can get more into less space. The photos were taken in natural light BTW, as the sun actually appeared for a while today.

 

My other achievement, if you can call it that, is to complete my sequence timetable, which includes almost everything, passenger and freight, which according to the Working Timetables ran through Peterborough North between 0715 and 2215 in the summer of 1958. Only 360 moves are required to complete the sequence. :rolleyes: Now, the question is, am I crazy even to contemplate this? It will take many hours to complete. I'm not too sure about this - am I trying to do far too much. Your opinions would be very helpful folks.

 

After Christmas I'm hoping that we can get some more fiddle yard laid, and start fitting some Tortoises. The next baseboard is promised for the 30th, so things should get moving.I'll post some more then, but in the meantime a Happy Christmas and a peaceful and prosperous New Year to all who have watched and contributed to this thread. Your interest and comments are much appreciated.

 

Gilbert.

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Superb Gilbert Superb.

 

The GA A4, The ex Coronation twin set and the Gresley Restaurant Triplet set are excellent and I look forward to seeing the rest of the stock and your layout progress.

 

I have built the Mailcoach Silver Jubilee set, which I am happy with, but know etched kits are much better. Cost and skills the determining factor. I have also built a single Restaurant car and a full baggage coach, both Kirk kits in LNER Teak. I have started collecting the Coronation sets to build next year, other than some Wagon kits and the layout I will have to find some time.

 

Keep up the good work and have a great Christmas.

Looking forward to see some British layouts when I am in UK in April-May next year.

 

Mark in OZ

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Quite a lot has happened over Christmas, most notably the delivery of the third baseboard. It may sound strange, but this whole thing has been a bit unreal up to now - I couldn't really believe it was going to happen - but this latest board has suddenly brought the whole thing to life, and now I can see how this is going to turn out. To say the least, I'm excited. Anyway, here are some photos, not very good I'm afraid as there isn't much daylight at the moment, and flash just burns everything out, so this doesn't do Norman Saunders' superb track justice, but you'll get an idea at least.

 

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This shows just the start of the new bit.

 

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and these two show the rest. It might be an idea if I identify what all this track is for. Starting at the window, first we have the down slow, then the up slow, and the third track leads to Platform 6, a down island platform known for some reason as "The Excursion platform". Then we have the entrance to two down bays, platforms 4 and 5. Here unfortunately is where the biggest compromise on the whole layout has taken place, as these roads should both have their own access off the down main, together with a very complex arrangement of slips, the purpose of which I never have been able to fathom out. The real thing can't be done in the space available, so this is the best I can achieve. The next two tracks are the down and up main respectively, heading down to the end of the first of the two notorious dog leg curves. We don't quite get to the end of it on this board. After that we have the access road to two carriage sidings, and via double slip to an independent engine road to New England shed. From that road there is access to the old engine shed yard, which again does not really come onto this board. Finally, there is the access to the District Engineers yard. The signal box is North box, built by our own Gravy Train. I couldn't resist putting it in place just to see what it would look like. The white object next to it is a temporary arrangement to help with alignment of the next board when it arrives. Sorry folks, things are getting out of order for some reason. The close up is to show the double slip next to the signal box, which if you look closely you will see is on a curve! What superb craftsmen there are in this hobby.

 

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Right, let's see if we can get things back in some sort of order. No we can't :angry: I don't know what's going on, but hopefully you get the general idea.

 

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That will do for now, before I put a brick through the monitor. Tomorrow I'll take some more looking in the opposite direction, and show you the result of Rob Davey's labours on the fiddle yard.

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i didnt realise there were sidings in front of spital bridge like that, looking good though.

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wow, that is fantastic, even at this stage I can see where everything fits into the old Peterborough I have seen from books and pictures in my brief research of the topic.

 

I look forward to more!

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Some beautiful work Gilbert. I can't wait to see the layout later in the year....B)

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