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How realistic are your models? Photo challenge.

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A hot and gloriously sunny day at Bala Town.

DSCF2097.JPG.509f830bc192dc280e10be53ed23b0de.JPG

 

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On 04/12/2019 at 14:03, ianathompson said:

I came across this topic recently, whilst poking about in areas of the forum that I had not previously frequented. Having looked through the photos posted here I decided that my best efforts would not pass muster but then reconsidered.

 

The title is an open question, "How realistic are your models?" My honest reply would be, "Not very good!" Then I facetiously wondered whether that meant that I was barred from posting on this thread because it was based upon the assumption that only good modellers would post realistic photos. Are you allowed to post if you acknowledge that your models and pictures are not particularly good?! Interesting question, and I would bet that that was not behind the originator's perceived intentions! Anyway I have taken the plunge.

 

Anyone wishing to be critical of the realism of my train set could have a field day!. I've already taken a couple of pot shots! Feel free to do so yourself if so inclined.

 

https://flic.kr/p/2hULANP1 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

1. A Billard A 80D passes between two barns that bracket the track in the Altingablecaŭtoj. The trees certainly don't pass muster and the figure has been lifted straight out of a box. The windows on the railcar aren't too convincing either, although the model is over forty years old and was built in my youth. The whole scene is also a bit bright but I suspect that that is down my ineptitude with the photo editing package.(5 out of 10? It vaguely looks like a train running in the countryside.)

 

https://flic.kr/p/2hUP4Vy2 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

2. A Berliet railcar enters Jakarutu beneath a bastion of the ruined defences. The model is short of one compartment so it isn't the real McCoy. The stonework is a little bright and the backscene might as well have an arrow pointing out where it begins and the 3D scenery ends, the blending is so poor. The site was conceived as a deliberate attempt to see how far a painted backdrop would suffice as a quick and easy substitute for 3D modelling in a minor location on a large system. I suppose that the obvious answer is that it does not but I don't delude myself that I will ever produce anything much better! If I had really wanted to cheat I could have pulled the railcar forward an inch or two to hide the joint. (5 out of 10 in the realism stakes? If you half close your eyes you could possibly believe it was real. Alright totally close them then!)

 

https://flic.kr/p/2hUQeM13 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

3. The rack loco rolls to a halt high on the moors. The loco is generic and makes no provision for rack valve gear whilst the coach is a half baked attempt to represent a distressed vehicle. At least the tundra landscape wasn't too challenging to effect (it is all taken out of packets) and the photographer used a digital SLR so the exposure is quite good. He was a former colleague at the local High School and later told me that the kids thought this was a photo of the real thing! We must be breeding a half blind, credulous generation of children out here in the Fens! (Perhaps it hits the heights of 6 out of 10 based on a competent photographer wielding the camera and a simple scenic subject?)

 

https://flic.kr/p/2hUQeT84 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

4. Another diorama aimed at creating a rural ambience, of a peasant woman shovelling manure onto the dung pile. The cheapo trees mar the picture again and the haystack also screams, "This is a model". I suppose the absence of anything mechanical (barring the die-cast Schuco tractor) helps with the illusion. (Perhaps, given this caveat, and that it is a favourite photo, it might reach the heights of 7 out of 10, or am I deluding myself? As I have remarked before, lunacy is such a wonderful palliative in perceiving the worth of one's own models.)

 

https://flic.kr/p/2hUSknk5 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

5. The loco from the local goods runs down to the toe of the loop at Boursson. The loco is the type of abomination that gives freelancing a bad name and probably should not be allowed near a serious layout. The point operating system is conspicuously based on the Bavarian Railways trapezium lock, because the cover is open.  The weighted local ground throw, based upon a French prototype is released by the Schlusselwerk (a German system of sequential key locking) but it is incongruously painted in standard Swedish colours. This gives us a combination of equipment and liveries from three different national systems to work one piece of equipment on this freelanced layout. To paraphrase the question, "How realistic is this?". I assume that most people will have given up reading this post by this point but, aside form the subsiding grain silo and lurid backscene, the main point is, to what extent should incongruities be airbrushed out of photos to increase realism? The top of the backscene and the point operating knob have been digitally removed to create this image. (I suppose that we are plumbing the depths  of any known realism here so the photo might score as low as 2/2½ on the scale.)

 

I have enjoyed creating this post and engaging with the thought processes concerning realism. The vast majority of ham fisted modellers, in which band I include myself, will never obtain an image of their modelling which could be passed off as the real thing. In some ways I suppose that it could be argued that I have ducked the issue by deliberately modelling a freelanced railway in the non-existent province of an imaginary country, although this creates its own problems in turn.

 

I look forward to seeing the reaction (hopefully, fearfully, from behind the settee?!)

 

Ian T

I've known about this layout for a while and looked at the website. It has a delight quirkiness about it quite different from mainstream modelling, well worth a look in my opinion.

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Seeing as Ian has had the courage to post up photos of his layout, here's one that I took last week:

 

Moorland track in the setting sunP1010316.JPG.1b9476a107bf8c7755c5fe1894faa301.JPG

 

I was trying out some flocking on my grandson's layout (the one I re-started last Christmas and trying to get done for this one :whistle:).

 

Cheers,

 

Philip

 

(Well, I liked it as the sun just popped out for a few moments - it looked better in the flesh!)

 

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A prairie waits to leave the Forge sidings, heading for Truro.

 

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I took this photo of a class 60 I had here for sound and cab lights fitting, I used the zoom camera on my iPhone 11 Pro Max and edited it a little bit with Instagram, I really like how it turned out

 

78151102_2167144040052227_3906014559458033664_o-2.jpg.be1b5041d2a916e6de031eb6f84bd871.jpg

 

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5513 departs Porth Merryn on 2nd May 1956.

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9 hours ago, Northmoor said:

Very nice scenes in all those you've posted.  What's the small Prairie - Bachmann?

Thanks, Yes, It's a Bachmann, I had 4555 and 5513 with the sloping Tanks, both really good runners, and petty little Locos, IMHO.:good:

Edited by Andrew P
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Good morning

 

A view across Haymarket MPD eastern elevation with some added smoke.

 

Regards

 

David

60510_IMG_0011S.jpg

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2 minutes ago, LNER4479 said:

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/1841163677_Shap_BW_MaidenLane(AYork).jpg.3882187fa358af797f349b084717da53.jpg

46248 'City of Leeds', in the last year of its life (1964), free wheels down Shap bank with the fast (perishables) fully fitted freight to London's Maiden Lane goods depot.

 

My layout - but not my picture. Courtesy of the webmeister Mr York and as posted by him on my layout thread yesterday.

 

Please forgive my (genuine) ignorance of such matters but shouldn't there be a guards/brake van? My knowledge of such matters is severely limited so this is a genuine enquiry.

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There is one - it's the third-to-last vehicle in the train. As it's fully fitted, then additional tail end traffic can be added (provided they are also fitted).

 

It was a bit of a thing with milk tanks on the West Coast mainline. The train depicted is based on a Derek Cross picture and there is plenty of other pictorial evidence of this practice, going back to LMS days.

Edited by LNER4479
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15 minutes ago, LNER4479 said:

There is one - it's the third-to-last vehicle in the train. As it's fully fitted, then additional tail end traffic can be added (provided they are also fitted).

 

It was a bit of a thing with milk tanks on the West Coast mainline. The train depicted is based on a Derek Cross picture and there is plenty of other pictorial evidence of this practice, going back to LMS days.

 

Many thanks for that -makes total sense.

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Up to 2 vehicles can be marshalled behind the brake van on a fully fitted train (steam era) with the brakes working.  It was done for marshalling purposes to minimise shunting moves when picking up or dropping off traffic, or (particularly on the ECML) at the behest of the guard to steady the ride of the brake van at the higher speeds.  The train pictured can run up to 55mph assuming the milk tanks are loaded (they were restricted to 45mph empty) and could run up to 60mph without them (45mph for short wheelbase vehicles was introduced in the late 60s).  ECML fully fitted goods and fish trains were famous for liberally interpretation of those limits, encouraged by the use of pacifics and V2s, and the ride in the van could be a bit, um, lively...

 

Hope it's not a hot day, as the guard is going to be surrounded by the small of gone-off milk and decaying fish from the exteriors of the vehicles.

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