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1 hour ago, corneliuslundie said:

I assume that Monsal Dale Viaduct was already a walking route when you took the photo. A nice walk but a bit wet at times beside the river.

Jonathan

 

 

Yes it was by then.  By the way it's one of Dad's photos, hence the J in the file number.

 

I used to know the area quite well, when I was young it was a favourite family day out - with trains back then.

 

Later, when I was a student in Manchester we had several visits to the area for Biology fieldwork - I suppose we did some work but my main memory is of picnics and talking.

 

David  

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Good afternoon, David. I like the Newcastle bridges photo’s, from the 18th November, 1995, which are full of interest and show aspects of those bridges that most photo’s usually do not. In C20651, with the High level bridge, and a class 156 crossing it, with the Swing Bridge and the Tyne Bridge beyond it, with the QE2 bridge in front of them all, you can see that the QE2 bridge is actually not bad for a more modern structure and fits in well with the much older structures.  The following photo’, C20637, with a Metro crossing the QE2 Bridge again shows what a well designed structure it is.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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The last time I was in Newcastle I stayed in the hotel that you can see straight ahead along the riverside in photo C20651. This was the view:

 

6E60C3E8-97BB-4C45-9DD6-C24555BB3E63.jpeg.00f73428d38b0a8dceac1e5e3300a34d.jpeg 
The Metro trains make quite a noise as they cross the QE2 bridge.

Edited by Western Aviator
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Good evening, David. I like the Newcastle Central photo’s, all of which are of interest. The last photo’, with an unidentified class 143 railbus, on the 16th August, 1989, is a superb shot which shows the majesty of the curved trainshed roof. York is, of course, the other big station to have such an imposing roof.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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20 hours ago, Market65 said:

Good evening, David. I like the Newcastle Central photo’s, all of which are of interest. The last photo’, with an unidentified class 143 railbus, on the 16th August, 1989, is a superb shot which shows the majesty of the curved trainshed roof. York is, of course, the other big station to have such an imposing roof.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

There are others - St. Pancras, Kings Cross, Bristol Temple Meads and Brighton come to mind...

Edited by talisman56
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39 minutes ago, DaveF said:

J4248.jpg Travelling over the newly installed (then) experimental slab track...

Last time I looked (within the last couple of years I think), there was still the remains of another section of experimental slab track on the up side of the line north of Derby, in the Belper/Duffield area. Now out of use and a bit overgrown.

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Good evening, David. I like the photo’s from around Radcliffe on Trent, on the Grantham to Nottingham line. All are of interest, and on enlarging the last photo’, with a Grantham to Nottingham train, in March, 1975, you can see the ‘upright’ cab windows typical of a class 104 DMU. The short 57 foot bodies with three and a half windows between the two passenger doors are further clues.
 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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On 28/04/2021 at 18:37, brushman47544 said:

Hope it’s all ok now. We saw that photo of 47344 not that long ago, by the way, but good to see it again as I was on the train as far as Darlington.

 

 

Things are improving, I think.

 

I've checked the photo of 47344, I hadn't realised I'd posted my version of the image a short time ago, the one this week was Dad's version - We must have been standing next to each other that day!

 

David

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Interesting how much changing light has affected the two freight train photos. If you were building a model and had lighting like one of those you would probably be told it was all wrong - whichever one you had chosen.

Jonathan

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Good evening, David. I like the latest Ulgham Lane crossing photo’s which are all of interest. In the first photo’, of a class 143, Pacer, 143007, on a Berwick-upon-Tweed to Newcastle service, on the 7th May, 1988, you have a scene which is historical in two respects. The Pacers have gone and the ECML is now electrified. So thank you for taking such photo’s of these everyday scenes.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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Another lovely set, Dave.

 

91 007, back in the days when it carried the name "Ian Allan", looking very powerful, and 60 074 - has this loco carried more liveries that any other class 60? Off the top of my head, it's carried at least four.

 

Enjoy your Bank Holiday weekend.

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Good evening, David. I like the Blythe and Tyne photo’s at Winning and Cambois. All are of interest, and that last photo’ at Cambois, with 56134, on a breakdown train with a crane, out of sight, in December, 1990, has a quite stark lighting effect in the low December sun. 
 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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Good evening, David. I like the Market Overton and Sewstern photo’s on what was the preserved railway from the end of the former High Dyke branch. All are of historical interest, and it’s such a shame it could not work out. In the last photo’ at Sewstern, with Hunslet, Primrose, number 2, and 03, number D2381, on empty coaching stock to Carnforth, in October, 1974, I am just wondering how far the train got before possibly being hauled by something else over BR metals - a class 37?
I like Newcastle photo’s which are all of interest, and in C13861, with 142516 and 143605, on the 16th August, 1989, you can see the non standard roller blind indicator box on the 142. I cannot recall if any others were so fitted. 
 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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1 hour ago, Market65 said:

Good evening, David. I like the Market Overton and Sewstern photo’s on what was the preserved railway from the end of the former High Dyke branch. All are of historical interest, and it’s such a shame it could not work out. In the last photo’ at Sewstern, with Hunslet, Primrose, number 2, and 03, number D2381, on empty coaching stock to Carnforth, in October, 1974, I am just wondering how far the train got before possibly being hauled by something else over BR metals - a class 37?
I like Newcastle photo’s which are all of interest, and in C13861, with 142516 and 143605, on the 16th August, 1989, you can see the non standard roller blind indicator box on the 142. I cannot recall if any others were so fitted. 
 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

 

A BR loco took over the coaches from High Dyke Junction - BR turned a blind eye to privately owned locos running along the High Dyke branch, which was officially closed anyway.

 

I never asked about the signalling arrangements at High Dyke where traffic was exchanged from a closed line to the ECML.

 

I'm not sure what took the coaches to Carnforth, at the time the usual locos in the area were Classes 31 and 47.

 

David

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