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The Sheep Chronicles : Chapter 5: Woolney. A pastoral corner of the Wisbleat and Upwool.......The Sheep goes East. These are the continuing adventures of Norman Lockhart, connoisseur of traditional British breakfasts and well filled baps.


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I would have thought that gassing kitchen etc cars far outlasted any need of gas for lighting (on the BR system at any rate) although later diners went over to using bottled propane - or rather I think it was propane.

Hi Mike,

Yes it was Propane.

Propane does not freeze or suffer pressure reduction in cold weather in the way Butane does - of concern when the bottles are in cabinets subject to wind chill on a moving train.

If I remember correctly BR had a supply contract with Calor for many years.

Regards

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There is a photo of the plate in Peter Kay's book.

 

 

Passenger services were withdrawn from 7th September 1963. 1421 hauled the last train. D2140 worked the goods from the following Monday. Later on it was 22s and 25s up to closure in 1975.

We have seen shots of Hymeks too at Hemyock.

 

Kevin

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I am becoming increasingly concerned about the way this thread is losing its muse with reference to things such as rhinos and uandress.  So let's get back on the curvy and delightful please -

 

attachicon.gifhb1.jpg

 

Well, I dropped by this thread hoping to see some fantastic models and I have to say I haven't been in the slightest bit disappointed.

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I was dubious about the Blue Anchor SB model as well.

 

In order to get the 'right' SB type you need to consider not only the size of frame which it needs to accommodate, but also when, and by whom, the SB was erected in the first place. No good having an early style of box if the design was superseded long before your railway is assumed to have been opened. On the other hand, if you have an 'early-ish' railway, then if you're going to use a box like BA (opened 1904) you will need an ''excuse' for it being of a latter type. EG at BA the 1904 replaced an older box when the passing-loop was added. Other excuses might include station layout expansion requiring a bigger box in a different location or a box getting burnt down and needing to be replaced etc. My 'gut feeling' is that a smaller, older, wooden superstructure type on the platform /might/ be more suitable, but it would depend upon the actual layout.

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I am becoming increasingly concerned about the way this thread is losing its muse with reference to things such as rhinos and uandress.  So let's get back on the curvy and delightful please -

 

attachicon.gifhb1.jpg

That's a bloke.......it's obvious from the ......................................................

Quack

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I would have thought that gassing kitchen etc cars far outlasted any need of gas for lighting (on the BR system at any rate) although later diners went over to using bottled propane - or rather I think it was propane.

Ah the nightmare that is the identification of what 'drove' the equipment on catering vehicles at a particular time. I suppose the old gas stuff was converted to electrics once coaching stock was electrically heated so it bears no relevance to this period.

As for the Thompsons being 'refilled' at Exeter, I'd really like to know if they were converted to gas on transfer. I'm not convinced but happy to be shot down in a flurry of feathers and beak. can't find any info in my huge library of coach info re LNER coaches.

 

P

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Thanks to the feathered menace who sowed the seed.....

 

The 'Shallowford Rocket' ( average speed 20mph) is now seen in the early sixties guise with the Thompson suburban brake coaches 'aquired'. Apparently, two were originally sent for use on another Devon branch but despite assurances that they had been sent, could not be located

.....until the closure of the Shallowford branch in 1964.

Two more were sent a couple of years later (1962)for use on the Hemyock branch. Normally only one was used but on Saturdays and Market days, both were required due to Squire Craddock sending produce from the estate.

 

Rob

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post-14122-0-11593900-1421156606_thumb.jpg

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Over on Western Thunder, Steve Cook has been upgrading a Hornby Thompson brake - http://www.westernth...e-2#post-111536

 

Followed the Captains link above earlier. Some really good stuff there and gave a lot of information about the Thompson coaches.

 

To echo Duckys observation, these really are tremendous models and are undoubtedly some of the best RTR coaches ever.

 

Bamfylde is starting to make sense now.

 

I am still in two minds whether or not to have a loop. Obviously operation will suffer but I can't help feeling that it would be more in keeping with the location, not to have a loop.

 

Reluctantly, Blue Anchor box will not be used. There will a smaller box on the platform. I think that small structures will lend the station a more spacious feel and allow the scenery to dominate.

 

Rob

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Ah the nightmare that is the identification of what 'drove' the equipment on catering vehicles at a particular time. I suppose the old gas stuff was converted to electrics once coaching stock was electrically heated so it bears no relevance to this period.

As for the Thompsons being 'refilled' at Exeter, I'd really like to know if they were converted to gas on transfer. I'm not convinced but happy to be shot down in a flurry of feathers and beak. can't find any info in my huge library of coach info re LNER coaches.

 

P

HSTs definitely had all electric kitchen equiipment - I'm rather wary of making such a definitive statement for anything built prior to them as many (all?) Mk1 catering vehicles had gas fuelled kit.

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Poor old Rob. Seems like anyone called Rob and that owns, or plans to own a GWR/WR layout has to put up with some very annoying posts! I shall be speaking to Mr York about this! Only on page 6 and things are totally out of hand. Absolutely disgusting. As for that Duck character, it should be ordered to get in the loft and get on with something sensible.

D. Cameron.

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Reluctantly, Blue Anchor box will not be used. There will a smaller box on the platform. I think that small structures will lend the station a more spacious feel and allow the scenery to dominate.

 

 

Rob - before you make a final commitment either way, have a think also about what will 'look right' in the overall context of the scene that you are looking to create.

 

A later pattern box, like Blue Anchor, is certainly a possibility, as you could easily argue that signalling upgrades or the like had been done around the turn of the century, so you now have the choice of the older or newer pattern boxes.

 

What I'd like to suggest is that you take the new(ish) Ratio Type 7 signalbox kit, and kit-bash it to produce a slightly smaller box, perhaps a 4 window one. You could platform-mount it as well, but you'd have something that was completely individual and very 'GWR'...

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Rob - before you make a final commitment either way, have a think also about what will 'look right' in the overall context of the scene that you are looking to create.

 

A later pattern box, like Blue Anchor, is certainly a possibility, as you could easily argue that signalling upgrades or the like had been done around the turn of the century, so you now have the choice of the older or newer pattern boxes.

 

What I'd like to suggest is that you take the new(ish) Ratio Type 7 signalbox kit, and kit-bash it to produce a slightly smaller box, perhaps a 4 window one. You could platform-mount it as well, but you'd have something that was completely individual and very 'GWR'...

The newish Ratio 'box is rather nice and a sort of 'in between' size as far as the lever frame is concerned being right for around 21-23 levers.  I don't know about shortening it but it is very difficult to extend it due  to the way the windows don't work out in relation to just about everything else.

 

What seems to be emerging here is something akin to Staverton on the SDR - small structure working not very much -

 

post-6859-0-67789300-1421189142_thumb.jpg

 

post-6859-0-29356700-1421189179_thumb.jpg

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HSTs definitely had all electric kitchen equiipment - I'm rather wary of making such a definitive statement for anything built prior to them as many (all?) Mk1 catering vehicles had gas fuelled kit.

Hi,

Some of the earlier Mk1 catering vehicles - particularly full kitchen cars - were equipped with anthracite fuelled stoves.

These were some of the earliest Mk1 corridor stock withdrawals.

 

Regards

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  • NHY 581 changed the title to The Sheep Chronicles : Chapter 5: Woolney. A pastoral corner of the Wisbleat and Upwool.......The Sheep goes East. These are the continuing adventures of Norman Lockhart, connoisseur of traditional British breakfasts and well filled baps.
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