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LNER/BR(ER) modellers - heads up!


jwealleans
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Mousa 51ft underframes have been available for a little while now (or rather available again as I believe they are a re-release). @billbedford has kindly added battery boxes to them as the usual ones are a little big for these.

 

They are a separate part from the underframe print so you can choose to fit one, two or none. I've not attached the support strap to the solebar hence the small gap.

 

20230210_184124.jpg.399778d9d72c6c492e38adebcf673954.jpg

 

20230210_184412.jpg.c5d225c3060d72015ee609f72d8166d5.jpg

 

 

Edited by Bucoops
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  • 2 months later...

Over the weekend I was pointed towards Bygone Wagons in Australia.   3D printed wagons which I was advised are of very high quality.

 

Although the range is heavily oriented to the GW, there are some which are applicable to the LNER.

 

On 'Rolling Stock 1', the Cordon DD4 is very similar to an NER vehicle.  

 

'Rolling Stock 2' has warflats and warwells (these were the wagons my acquaintance has had from them) but also a 6 wheel road tanker wagon and tank which might be adaptable to the ones the LNER used.

 

'Rolling Stock 3' includes the Parrot, which the LNER also built and the original design of Grano which they adopted. That needs different buffers, brake levers and solebar steps but is otherwise identical to the GW build.

 

If anyone else has knowledge of the range, please comment.

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On 13/04/2023 at 10:01, jwealleans said:

Over the weekend I was pointed towards Bygone Wagons in Australia.   3D printed wagons which I was advised are of very high quality.

 

Although the range is heavily oriented to the GW, there are some which are applicable to the LNER.

 

On 'Rolling Stock 1', the Cordon DD4 is very similar to an NER vehicle.  

 

'Rolling Stock 2' has warflats and warwells (these were the wagons my acquaintance has had from them) but also a 6 wheel road tanker wagon and tank which might be adaptable to the ones the LNER used.

 

'Rolling Stock 3' includes the Parrot, which the LNER also built and the original design of Grano which they adopted. That needs different buffers, brake levers and solebar steps but is otherwise identical to the GW build.

 

If anyone else has knowledge of the range, please comment.

'Rolling Stock 3' also has Ramp wagons, which were used with the Warflats to allow tanks onto the 'flats from ground level, very useful accessory wagon to the 'flats.

 

Also, there's a nice looking LNER Refrigerator Van on 'Upcoming Wagons', available on the 'More' dropdown menu to the right of 'Rolling Stock 5'...

Edited by Chas Levin
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  • 1 month later...

Andrew Emmett has taken delivery of some of the refrigerator vans mentioned above and finished them here.   Turns out they were his commission, so we thank him for that.   I may have one of my own to report on before too long.

 

Some of you may have picked up on a recent trip to Germany - while we were there, Steve Pearce (31A) drew my attention to this:

 

image.png.fe55eedc9d19fc6931c0a6d6e7c7c4dc.png

 

A new publication from Transport Treasury.   Online information about the contents was a bit scant, but I now have a copy and can report the following.   Overall, nicely produced and bound with decent reproduction of the photos.   Pictures are mainly TT's own as you'd expect, but not entirely.   With no disrespect to them I was not familiar with any of the contributors and overall that's probably a good thing, if more researchers and authors are generating material.   Contents are quite eclectic with something of a Lincolnshire bias.  The two largest articles cover the Mablethorpe Loop and the development of Grimsby and surrounds stimulated by the railways.   Some personal recollections (the West Highland Railway), some moderately technical (ACFI Feed Water Heaters from the Railway Engineer, July 1928), a photo feature on Cambridge, the Queen's visit to Stratford in 1962 and an article on concrete signals which veers into a history of William Marriott.  There'll be a little bit of something to everyone's taste.  Whether it will be enough to justify buying every issue remains to be seen.

 

I gather there are already equivalent publications for the other 3 Big Four companies - anyone have any observations on those which might indicate where this series is likely to go?

 

 

 

 

Edited by jwealleans
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On 13/04/2023 at 17:01, jwealleans said:

 

 

If anyone else has knowledge of the range, please comment.

Jonathan, I have dealt with Amanda for several years now and she has provided me with a good number of wagons, which with a little care and attention, turn out very well in my opinion.

DSCN0197.JPG.c96307fefc65b4fe713e224bd8ffe539.JPG

 

Parrot wagon with load.

DSCN0253(2).JPG.053c27a36704829d7de281652fa514a3.JPG

LMS Iron Ore hoppers.

DSCN0652.JPG.effeea97b366e919f14f67071a4fea6d.JPG

 

GW Grano.

More in next post.

Peter C.

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DSCN0439(2).JPG.ca5a02bc933e5e3623316d23938344d8.JPG

B.R. Strip coil wagons and loads.

DSCN0328(3).JPG.e86a7cfab0411718f6d3a3316a3d4440.JPG

Conflat LD and dolomite containers.

Cordon2005(1024x768).jpg.5763fac849301ce7af1b50d39f478f81.jpg

Cordon.

Amanda is very easy to deal with and can offer savings if you wish to use your own wheels, couplings etc. which she then does not have to provide. I am waiting for her Insixfish van, she messaged me recently that it not too far away!

Cheers from Oz,

Peter C.

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21 hours ago, jwealleans said:

Andrew Emmett has taken delivery of some of the refrigerator vans mentioned above and finished them here.   Turns out they were his commission, so we thank him for that.   I may have one of my own to report on before too long.

 

Some of you may have picked up on a recent trip to Germany - while we were there, Steve Pearce (31A) drew my attention to this:

 

image.png.fe55eedc9d19fc6931c0a6d6e7c7c4dc.png

 

A new publication from Transport Treasury.   Online information about the contents was a bit scant, but I now have a copy and can report the following.   Overall, nicely produced and bound with decent reproduction of the photos.   Pictures are mainly TT's own as you'd expect, but not entirely.   With no disrespect to them I was not familiar with any of the contributors and overall that's probably a good thing, if more researchers and authors are generating material.   Contents are quite eclectic with something of a Lincolnshire bias.  The two largest articles cover the Mablethorpe Loop and the development of Grimsby and surrounds stimulated by the railways.   Some personal recollections (the West Highland Railway), some moderately technical (ACFI Feed Water Heaters from the Railway Engineer, July 1928), a photo feature on Cambridge, the Queen's visit to Stratford in 1962 and an article on concrete signals which veers into a history of William Marriott.  There'll be a little bit of something to everyone's taste.  Whether it will be enough to justify buying every issue remains to be seen.

 

I gather there are already equivalent publications for the other 3 Big Four companies - anyone have any observations on those which might indicate where this series is likely to go?

Looks very interesting Jonathan, thank you (and Steve P too) for drawing attention. 

It looks as if it favours a slightly later era though - is that largely because there's so much more material available than for pre-grouping or early LNER times?

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8 hours ago, 45568 said:

 

Amanda is very easy to deal with and can offer savings if you wish to use your own wheels, couplings etc. which she then does not have to provide. I am waiting for her Insixfish van, she messaged me recently that it not too far away!

Cheers from Oz,

Peter C.

I first came across this range on ebay, and I don't think she had the website back then.  I too have been happy with the quality of her wagons (particularly the GWR crocodile and "Dyson" Ro-Ro milk tankers) and the service she provides.  They are more like unliveried RTR than kits - some bits are supplied separately, but it's never a big assembly job.

 

Postage from Australia is inevitably expensive (as it is the other way) and it seems unreasonable when added to the cost of a single wagon.  I have considerable sympathy with our Aussie cousins over what is costs them for anything produced in this country, especially for very small items.  However the cost doesn't increase proportionately as the number of wagons increases, so it does makes sense to order several wagons at once to reduce the percentage of your outlay that she has to pay for the shipping service.

 

When funds permit I will be placing another order - I want some of those dolomite wagons, a Cordon and pehaps a couple of ICI hoppers, but I will probably wait until the Insixfish is ready.

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On 30/06/2023 at 17:24, Chas Levin said:

That's a very nice looking vehicle Johan!

Thanks Chas,

 

It's actually my third Isinglass coach, I made a pigeon van and a GNR Howlden 45' Clerestory Luggage brake van. 

Both a bit too dark painted for my liking, so I changed the basecoat from black to light grey, but good testbeds for working with 3D kits, imitating teak, and lining coaches (for that I went back to enamel for the first time in a decade, and a big thank you to Mike Trice for the YT videos!!).

 

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5 hours ago, Johan DC said:

Thanks Chas,

 

It's actually my third Isinglass coach, I made a pigeon van and a GNR Howlden 45' Clerestory Luggage brake van. 

Both a bit too dark painted for my liking, so I changed the basecoat from black to light grey, but good testbeds for working with 3D kits, imitating teak, and lining coaches (for that I went back to enamel for the first time in a decade, and a big thank you to Mike Trice for the YT videos!!).

 

 

We've covered similar ground then: I haven't built any Mail coaches, but I've built both the LNER Pigeon Van and a 45' Clerestory Luggage brake, though they were from D&S kits rather than Isinglass: the 45' one is the first model on my own modelling thread (linked in my signature) and the Pigeon Van is further on in the same thread.

The 45' coach was an early attempt at teaking, the Pigeon Van was a few along and looks a lot better.

For teak basecoat I too start off with something very light too, usually Phoenix Precision's Teak Basecoat P995.

 

If you're after further teak techniques, Jonathan Weallean's West End Workbench thread on here has some excellent teaking techniques (hope it's OK to reference you for this @jwealleans?). That link should take you straight to page 36 of his thread, which features a tutorial on coach teaking (previously been available on the LNER forum) but in case it doesn't and you land instead on page 1 (which I've noticed some RMWeb links seem to do some of the time) the teaking recipe post was on April 19, 2017.

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Side Lamps for 1930s/40s Toad D and E brake vans.

 

I'm tidying up some of my older stock. Constructed some 30 years ago. A re-worked Dapol Toad E appears to have reasonable lamps. I think I must have attempted to make lamps for a Bachmann Toad E , but they look a bit small.

 

I could probably work out how to make some, but does anyone know of a possible provider?

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17 hours ago, Chas Levin said:

 

We've covered similar ground then: I haven't built any Mail coaches, but I've built both the LNER Pigeon Van and a 45' Clerestory Luggage brake, though they were from D&S kits rather than Isinglass: the 45' one is the first model on my own modelling thread (linked in my signature) and the Pigeon Van is further on in the same thread.

The 45' coach was an early attempt at teaking, the Pigeon Van was a few along and looks a lot better.

For teak basecoat I too start off with something very light too, usually Phoenix Precision's Teak Basecoat P995.

 

If you're after further teak techniques, Jonathan Weallean's West End Workbench thread on here has some excellent teaking techniques (hope it's OK to reference you for this @jwealleans?). That link should take you straight to page 36 of his thread, which features a tutorial on coach teaking (previously been available on the LNER forum) but in case it doesn't and you land instead on page 1 (which I've noticed some RMWeb links seem to do some of the time) the teaking recipe post was on April 19, 2017.

Thanks for the tips! I'll have some reading (and learning) ahead of me!

Would a Comet Pigeon van be a good starter for a solder novice like me (apart from elec. wiring)?

Or are there other LNER models that are better suited to learn the ropes?

 

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20 minutes ago, Johan DC said:

Thanks for the tips! I'll have some reading (and learning) ahead of me!

Would a Comet Pigeon van be a good starter for a solder novice like me (apart from elec. wiring)?

Or are there other LNER models that are better suited to learn the ropes?

 

 

Well if you're totally new to soldering, then I'd suggest the smaller and simpler the better - an open wagon is a good start, just to get used to soldering and to making sure the wheels are all in contact with the rails and everything's square! Wizard Models (where I'm guessing you've looked at Comet kits) do lots of wagons and vans under various brands such as 51L; whether you want to start with brass or white metal is another question; some find brass easier because although you're working at higher temperatures, there's no chance or damaging the actual brass pieces, whereas with white metal, achievening a strong joint whilst also avoiding melting the castings can take a bit of practice.

If you like reading books (as opposed to reading online) then Iain Rice's books on kits would be my recommended reading - the one on building white metal locos has a huge amount of info just on white metal kits, equally applicable to wagons or vans.

If you prefer online reading, I'd guess there must be lots of stuff on YouTube about soldering (certainly, Tony Wright;s videos can be found on there) and there's a lot to be said for watching a video of someone doing something like soldering, because actually seeing how molten solder behaves and what happens when the joint gets sufficiently hot for the solder to flow properly is difficult to convey really graphically in words but easy to see when it's done...

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On 03/07/2023 at 13:22, Chas Levin said:

 

Well if you're totally new to soldering, then I'd suggest the smaller and simpler the better - an open wagon is a good start, just to get used to soldering and to making sure the wheels are all in contact with the rails and everything's square! Wizard Models (where I'm guessing you've looked at Comet kits) do lots of wagons and vans under various brands such as 51L; whether you want to start with brass or white metal is another question; some find brass easier because although you're working at higher temperatures, there's no chance or damaging the actual brass pieces, whereas with white metal, achievening a strong joint whilst also avoiding melting the castings can take a bit of practice.

If you like reading books (as opposed to reading online) then Iain Rice's books on kits would be my recommended reading - the one on building white metal locos has a huge amount of info just on white metal kits, equally applicable to wagons or vans.

If you prefer online reading, I'd guess there must be lots of stuff on YouTube about soldering (certainly, Tony Wright;s videos can be found on there) and there's a lot to be said for watching a video of someone doing something like soldering, because actually seeing how molten solder behaves and what happens when the joint gets sufficiently hot for the solder to flow properly is difficult to convey really graphically in words but easy to see when it's done...

2 51L kits ordered. Will pick them up (with some other orders) later this week. Cheaper to make a short trip to Albion once in a while than paying all these VAT, import, handling etc costs. One is a £12 Pig iron wagon. Ideal to start. In the mean time, already saw some YT, and got down the amazing rabbit hole of West End. Your link worked as intended. 👌

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20 hours ago, Johan DC said:

2 51L kits ordered. Will pick them up (with some other orders) later this week. Cheaper to make a short trip to Albion once in a while than paying all these VAT, import, handling etc costs. One is a £12 Pig iron wagon. Ideal to start. In the mean time, already saw some YT, and got down the amazing rabbit hole of West End. Your link worked as intended. 👌

Excellent - very glad to hear it and hope the wagons go well. Lots of people - myself included - prefer metal to plastic for all sorts of reasons, others disagree of course: see what you think...

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  • 3 months later...

Eastern Times Volume 2 is now available.  i picked up a copy at Shildon show.   Contents and preview in the link: I've skimmed it thus far.  The D20 article looks interesting, the B17 article casts doubt on a number of withdrawal dates and the article about the New Works scheme has some interesting photographs of the LNER in East London.  The article about Henry Casserley and accompanying photographs is the highlight thus far for me.

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Floyd Kraemer now has a website to order their 3D prints:

 

https://fk3d.co.uk/

 

And for 7mm modellers, with the kind assistance of the Great Eastern Railway Society (and my badgering!/), 15 spoke "Buckjumper" wheels are now available:

 

PXL_20231210_172241252.jpg.f0800625642b9ccd86ec2def891f4ccb.jpg

 

Used on shunting locos, they were unbalanced and a slightly longer stroke - hence the joggled rods on the Connoisseur kit.

Edited by Bucoops
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Two items which have recently come ot my attention; Ian MacDonald is offering a brass kit for the BR Diagram 2/002 Armour Plate wagon which can also be built as the prewar LMS and LNER versions.    As it happens I'm almost through a scratchbuild of one of these:

 

spacer.png

 

If anyone is considering a brass kit, I can't recommend Ian's highly enough.  I believe the first batch may be all or largely spoken for, but there will undoubtedly be another run.

 

At Doncaster show, Brian at 247 kindly gave me a set of 6 3D printed containers they've just launched.   Four of the set of 6 are LMS, one GWR and one LNER, a ventilated steel BL from 1929.   Individual containers are available by order.

 

247_containers.jpg.74e9099952c5976635e89aeec6cd205d.jpg

 

 

 

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