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BBC article on forgotten stations


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I thought it was a good article and the two Liverpool stations briught back many memories for me.  I've got some slides of Exchange somewhere and of central.   I should have a particualr emotional link to Liverpool Exchange as my late father was taking loco numbers there one day in late October 1952 and the laconic comment "James born"   appears at the side of the page.   He was there looking at 72002 when my poor mother was in labour in Carlisle.

 

Jamie

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...I'd meant to post it earlier too but the morning's chaos of kids waking up took over rather! I was half expecting several of us on the forum to post it at the same time!

That said, I've not got my brain defrosted properly to digest the article fully yet...

TTFN

Ben

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Certainly an interesting article, but containing a strange statement: 'the Somerset and Dorset line which was closed within days in the 1930s' ? And in the Bath Green Park section, what is the 'station round shed'; Presumably he means the loco shed ?

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Nice article - thanks for the link. I've always been a sucker for "before and after" shots of railway infrastructure. One of my most treasured possessions was a hardback book featuring black and white shots of stations, yards etc in their heyday next to a colour shot of the same location in the wake of Beeching. It sadly ended up on a trip to a charity shop whilst my back was turned. As an aside to this thread, if anyone knows what that book was called, let me know and I'll try to get another copy. Pete.

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Pete 75C - You're thinking of 'then and now' type books. There have been lots of them over the years, and mostly they are of either specific lines or specific areas, so it would be difficult to lock down which one without more information of what subject was in yours.

 

Edit: like this Somerset and Dorset one: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Somerset-Dorset-Then-Mac-Hawkins/dp/184013321X

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Pete 75C - You're thinking of 'then and now' type books. There have been lots of them over the years, and mostly they are of either specific lines or specific areas, so it would be difficult to lock down which one without more information of what subject was in yours.

 

Edit: like this Somerset and Dorset one: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Somerset-Dorset-Then-Mac-Hawkins/dp/184013321X

 

Thanks Ian, that's the kind of thing. I'm reasonably sure mine was just London area, so I'll do a little digging online.

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Certainly an interesting article, but containing a strange statement: 'the Somerset and Dorset line which was closed within days in the 1930s' ? And in the Bath Green Park section, what is the 'station round shed'; Presumably he means the loco shed ?

I like the ffact that the 'source' for that is given as 'BBC News'. So citing yourself as a reference  :nono:

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I'm pretty sure they had that in the cheap bookshop over the road from starling's a while back

 

Thanks Russ. Guess where I'll be popping into tomorrow on the offchance they still have it...? Apologies for taking the thread off-topic!

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I thought it was a good article and the two Liverpool stations briught back many memories for me.  I've got some slides of Exchange somewhere and of central.   I should have a particualr emotional link to Liverpool Exchange as my late father was taking loco numbers there one day in late October 1952 and the laconic comment "James born"   appears at the side of the page.   He was there looking at 72002 when my poor mother was in labour in Carlisle.

 

Jamie

 

I remember both stations well, I travelled on a Farewell to Exchange special - several months before the actual closure !

I used to pester my mum to let me look to see if any trains were in the "big station" at Central which then mean walking down the spiral staircase to the low level where we caught the train to Rock Ferry - unless I could persuade her to get off at Hamilton Square and get a steam train from Woodside - she suffered for my art did my mum. I can only clearly remember a diesel at Central which would be the DMU to Gateacre presumably, but have vague memories of things with steam and smoke, but nothing more detailed.

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My own experience of Manchester Central was in it's GMEX incarnation, so my curiosity is always peaked by such articles (and of course Ron Heggs of this Parish and that layout of his he's tinkering with.........LOL).

 

Was slightly disappointed not to find a reference to Wolverhamptons low level station. Although in honesty I really should get of my lazy backside (or get on it would be more accurate) and burn up some internet time, researching it for myself.

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Should have come to Lincolnshire - plenty of 'Station Roads' but no station.  ISTR some 154+ were closed up to 1971. The town of Alford renamed their road as 'Beechings Way'.

 

BTW the blame is probably better put on Ernest Marples - Transport Minister at the time of Dr Richard Beeching's report. He did not drive but did own a large road construction company; after transferring his shares to his Wife, the firm built many roads in the UK. 

 

They allegedly emigrated after some funny business with the taxman.

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Should have come to Lincolnshire - plenty of 'Station Roads' but no station.  ISTR some 154+ were closed up to 1971. The town of Alford renamed their road as 'Beechings Way'.

 

BTW the blame is probably better put on Ernest Marples - Transport Minister at the time of Dr Richard Beeching's report. He did not drive but did own a large road construction company; after transferring his shares to his Wife, the firm built many roads in the UK. 

 

 

 

Correct me if I'm wrong but 75pct or more of the closures happened during a non-Conservative govt.  They had ample opportunity to reverse any skulldeggery by Marples. 

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A quick check on wikipedia gives the date of the 1964 election as 15th October, and as far as I can tell, many of the closures were earlier in 1964*. Even if the incoming Labour government had wanted to stop all closures, I dare say some would have been too far progressed to stop them closing immediately after the election.

 

* the ones I'm more aware of were the likes of the Salisbury and Dorset Junction which closed in 1964. Of course, there were 'quite a few' closures continuing into the 60s, and even into the 70s, and yes in those cases there was plenty of time to rethink for political parties of any colour. But that's Politics with a capital P and not for discussion unless we want the Mods or Andy to get the thread lock out.

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