Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 29/05/22 in Blog Comments

  1. Aye , the wagons in that Dunblane train almost look as if they have wooden wings over the axleboxes. Strange, and perhaps they are ex SC rather than Caley. Here is a photo of the ballast plough. Made about 15 years back, Basically scribed styrene with 10 thou slaters rod in a groove to look like the half round beading. A bit rough, but ok from a passing glimpse. The footboard has distorted a bit and it could do with a number plate.
    10 points
  2. Brassmasters do an etch of the padlocks in the Finney range if you want to recreate that detail. Part E14: https://www.brassmasters.co.uk/gwr_etched_components.htm
    9 points
  3. My version; no.1425 in brown complete with dodgy lining and wrongly place garter crest on the PBV:
    9 points
  4. Not so rare. You can tell it's the brown scheme from the lining and the cream cab insides: RCTS lists all the brown 517's. Most if not all had full cabs and outside bearings to the trailing wheels. Most were probably also autofitted at some time. PS: just the clarify, the lining on green locos was 2 orange lines whereas this has only one. You can see that around the cab the lining is edged in black
    9 points
  5. 92 & 93 are in 'Llangollen Red' as supplied by Williamson's. Having seen an original sample of Lake, I reckon the Llan got it about right. Where it fell down originally IMO was by applying only one topcoat over Williamson's recommended undercoat which is a rather nice red colour but shifts dramatically depending on the lighting conditions. When I repainted 93, it got two coats of Llan Red over a neutral grey undercoat. The original sample had evidence that Swindon used a pink undercoat (probably white lead + lake). Pete S.
    9 points
  6. This is the interpretation of the 517 'brown' by Tony Reynalds and Martyn Welch. It is not known whether this locomotive brown has any correlation with what was used on coaching stock.
    8 points
  7. Great to have that selection of pics for comparison on the same page, Mikkel. Thanks. My personal view is that 92 and 93 are probably the preservationists' best yet crimson lake, and that the colour for the Main Line & City stock as first preserved was wrong for crimson lake, but a rather excellent version of 1908 brown.
    8 points
  8. Below is a selection of Flickr photos of Didcot's 3755 (built June 1921) in post-1912 "Crimson Lake" (all taken prior to 2019 when it was repainted in the two-tone livery). I'm putting up a number of them to show different lighting conditions, angles, camera renderings etc. I know preservation liveries can't be used directly, especially if as @K14 says it comes down to a job-lot of donated 5-gallon drums. But the variations in appearance are interesting enough, I think. And the differences compared to the Railmotor and Autotrailer too, perhaps - the latter seem to represent a much redder/purple interpretation than the very brown appearance of 3755. RD16395. GWR Brake 3rd 3755. by Ron Fisher, on Flickr RD16394. GWR Brk 3rd 3755. by Ron Fisher, on Flickr GWR 1921 Churchward Non Corridor Brake 3rd No 3755 by Bob Lovelock, on Flickr GWR Churchward Non-Corridor Brake Third No. 3755, Didcot Railway Centre, circa 1990 by churchward82c, on Flickr Didcot Railway Centre,April 30 2016 by nick B, on Flickr 86F 265 GWR 3755 Moorgate at Didcot Railway Centre by snaebyllej2, on Flickr GWR Brake Third 3755, 18/03/2016, Didcot railway Centre by lee25nash, on Flickr GWR 3755 Churchward Non-Corridor Brake 3rd by Nick Baxter, on Flickr And here, the auto-trailer and railmotor: 92 by Hugh Llewelyn, on Flickr 93 & 92 by Hugh Llewelyn, on Flickr
    8 points
  9. Thanks Duncan. I do like clerestory coaches. I think you were going to print some yourself at one point? Looking forward to see those. Thank you Nick. At first I kept glancing at my Triang-bashed C10 and wondering why I hadn't just done another one like that, but the Slater's kit do make it worthwhile once they're done I think. Thanks Martyn. The Railway Magazine didn't think so! In June 1905 the magazine observed some GWR coaches painted experimentally in all-brown, and wrote: "In the RAILWAY MAGAZINE for August, 1903, page 168, we called attention to the fact that the Great Western Railway was experimenting with deeper shades of the standard colours chosen nearly seventy years ago by Brunel, whose fine artistic taste was never questioned by his most determined enemies. The experiment has developed in a much more pronounced form, and passenger rolling stock is now dinning wholly painted brown and only relieved by gold lining. Doubtless this new development is but a tentative measure called forth by economic considerations, and we therefore refrain from expressing an opinion on the glaring ugliness of the vehicles that are running in the new livery, because we feel sure that the directors of the Great Western Railway will recognise that economy can be purchased too dearly, and that the saving of a few thousands a year in paint can be lost a hundred times over in directions directly traceable to the colour of the rolling stock. Apart from mere opinion, however, the following facts must carry weight. The Great Central, Furness and Caledonian are railways which have, during recent years, abandoned sombre shades of paint, and adopted pleasing colour schemes for the exteriors of their passenger coaches. A portion of the large increase in passenger traffic on these progressive lines can fairly be traced to the improved appearance of the exteriors of the coaches. Why, even the Metropolitan, in making a bid for increased traffic, is abandoning its teak colour for white! The value of an inviting exterior is recognised by every trader, or why are shop fronts to-day so much more imposing than was the practice even ten years ago? The answer is: To attract the attention (and custom) of the man in the street. It is the custom of the man in the street that railways desire, and "to win the eye is to win all!" Westward, the London and South-Western Railway is the Great Western Railway's chief competitor, and the colour adopted by the former line is far preferable to the all brown shades now under trial on the Great Western Railway. Northward, the Great Western Railway meets the London and North-Western Railway, but how will the new colours compare with the pleasing shades that have helped to make the London and North-Western Railway famous? Apart from the monetary question, the directors of the Great Western Railway cannot afford to neglect public sentiment, which has always associated good taste and artistic fitness with the progress of our longest railway, we therefore have little doubt that the experiment will not be persisted in. Perhaps readers of the RAILWAY MAGAZINE will favour us with their views on the subject."
    8 points
  10. Simon - thanks! This is the last of the bracket signals to be built and it turned out to be rather difficult. I had to scrap most of the first go - I found some basic setting out errors and it was initially set up with angle cranks for the drive which didn't work at all well. On re-doing it, I used 'compensation' beams - much simpler and more authentic (doh!...why didn't I do that in the first place?). I have yet to fit the ladder (which is made) and it will need some guy wires as it would be unstable in the real world.
    7 points
  11. Ah yes, I do like that photo. What I wouldn't give for a day on that bench. Although in this particular case some of that scene could in fact be recreated, thanks to the preservation movement. Over in the Kernow Railmotor thread, Miss P posted a photo of a railmotor and clerestory 3rd in brown or crimson lake, which has got me thinking that the C10 could also be used for such a train at Farthing. I want to see how the windows on the Kernow railmotor turn out first though. On the subject of rooves during the 1908-22 period, Paddington photos provide interesting views. This is supposedly 1910. Note also stock on the right- and left hand sides. It's interesting how the two-tone livery lingered on in some cases. Below is a Windsor Royal Garden Party train alledgedly in 1913. Stock at the back in brown/crimson lake. You'd be forgiven for speculating that the GWR kept some two-tone stock in hand for certain events!
    7 points
  12. I don't remember from which gallery - probably the National, which you referenced above - but I read an article recently about the scientific retrieval of colour from paintings which have clearly changed colour with time (reds particularly affected). The article suggested that even with the basic chemical/mineral constituents established, the colour could not be sufficiently determined to allow truly "accurate" repair of the painting. I think that there have been attempts to retrieve colours in this way from other things but I suspect that they too may reduce the options but still have speculative outcomes. On the same quest, I did spend some time looking at Victorian and Edwardian paintings which are notorious for presenting what we think of as odd colorizations (?US spelling). It's a pity that WP Frith did not live later or longer as he was extremely concerned about getting the GWR rolling stock in 'The Railway Station' as accurate as possible, which included specially made photos provided by the company. The original version is at the Royal Holloway College (there are other later and smaller versions which he also painted) and is much better in terms of colour than reproductions allow - I was quite surprised when I saw it for real. The painting was 1862: for pre-group/Edwardian modellers, too early a date to offer much in the way of contemporary observation or record. Still, I will continue to keep an eye out in this direction knowing full well that I will label as "reasonably accurate" anything that reinforces my own prejudices and "hopelessy inaccurate" anything that does not. Otherwise, I will follow the receipe in the Ironmonger and "add yellow to bring about the desired shade". Kit PW https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blogs/blog/2502-swan-hill/
    7 points
  13. I seem to recall reading that the King preferred the LNWR Royal Train and this was kept in LNWR livery even into the LMS days, so maybe there was a royal fondness/connection to two-tone liveries.
    6 points
  14. Re. worn seats: From my commuting experience I would say lighter, but that may depend on the nature of fabric and its original/undyed colour. Or maybe this is one of those situations where the question is not how it looked in reality, but how it looks most convincing in model form? If so I would first try dry-brushed lighter. Re. 1908-1922 liveries. The issue of how different shades and varnish practices appear in daily operation has reminded me of the DSB "Maroon" livery (sic, the English term was used), which was known to enthusiasts as "Wine Red". This preserved example represents the "official" look: But amongst the ordinary public is was typically just described as "brown". Indeed I remember conversations about how dull it was. This photo illustrates my own recollection and is fairly kind, i.e. a not too dirty example. Below is the maroon livery again but contrasted with the subsequent "Red" livery on the coaches at the back. While the maroon was different from the GWR's "crimson lake" you can see how members of the public - and a staff writer at the Railway Magazine - might come away with a perception of "brown" when observing liveries of this type in everyday operation. Edited to avoid confusion about DSB livery dates, as these were not the same for all stock.
    6 points
  15. None of those approach what I'd call crimson lake but I'm a Midland man: [Embedded link to Midland Railway Trust website.] It's a lot of cochineal beetles, though, isn't it? I haven't found any evidence of a synthetic substitute, at the period.
    6 points
  16. Thanks George, good point about the fall plate and the fireman. Since the photo was taken a fall plate has been added and he has returned to duty, seemingly none the worse for wear. I can't say the same for his mate, ex-petty officer Solly...!
    6 points
  17. Interesting. So a bit like the rooves then, which started out white. I love an unresolved issue like this! Some reflections: 1. The lack of a record of a livery change is not unknown in other circumstances, remember the red to grey wagon livery debate. So that is not necessarily a deciding factor, in my view. 2. The no-brown theory would make the contemporary observations of the Railway Magazine wrong. I've often cautioned against relying too much on the latter, but they do insist on repeatedly describing the colour as brown in their further pursuit of the issue from 1908 onwards - see my compilation of quotes in the second pdf here: Since the staff of the Railway Magazine are so provoked by the issue, it seems odd that they would not have noticed the intended redder lake colour on freshly painted coaches over a four-year period? 3. We know that the lettering and insignia *did* change- not just in 1908, but also again after that when e.g. the "GWR" was moved to the center above the garter. A close study of coach building dates and their ex-works liveries could help here, but meanwhile see Penhros' useful illustrations and visualisation here: http://www.gwrcoaches.org.uk/ Edited to clarify.
    6 points
  18. As promised, I've taken a picture of my sample card with Humbrol No.160 German Camouflage Red Brown, as you see below. (Note, I erroneously posted that it was No.100, which is Red Brown, but much lighter than this Red Brown.) Unfortunately, my camera wanted to overexpose the card, so having made a correction to the image, the above can only be considered approximate. However, the right side shows how it looks with a coat of satin varnish (done with a small brush, so a little blotchy). No.160 seems to fall somewhere between Humbrol No.10 Service Brown (which I use for GWR Chocolate) and Precision GWR Coach (Crimson) Lake. Sometimes No.160 looks brown; and sometimes somewhat redder, almost but not reaching the level of Precision's crimson lake. I don't necessarily propose this as a candidate for the 1908 brown livery; but now that I can see how it looks varnished, I can see it as a possibility. One thing's for sure, this particular exercise has proven that you cannot rely on the camera, or posted images online for that matter, as true colour guides — as Mikkel has so ably shown us.
    5 points
  19. Railmotor at Bewdley. Acknowledging the adjacent LNWR tail-traffic through carriage from Woofferton to Birmingham, the contemporary GWR stock is in chocolate and cream.
    5 points
  20. The previous picture to this in Edwardian Enterprise states "the first GWR auto-train at Southall" so the colour scheme possibly dates back to then. I do not know how long the colours lasted but I have a 517, no. 1425, on my layout set in 1912 still in brown. It's my only homage to the brown livery but if anyone has evidence to the contrary please let me know.
    5 points
  21. All very interesting. It is nice to read a set of posts on colours that has no 'froth' in them. I love the 'add yellow to bring about the desired shade' as it puts things into perspective. I have enough trouble with Cambrian 'Bronze Green' which I fear is much more brown than I have painted my coaches, so what I will make of the GWR ones still to paint who knows. Now the colour palette from the 'Wrecker Co.' is interesting on a couple of points. When I 'Googled' 'Drab' I came up with a light brown. The palette has it as, well, is that brown or is that grey, or maybe browny grey? (The colour above the luggage racks in Cambrian First Class compartments is Drab Rep, so I need to know. Rep is some kind of material.) Now the colour palette has 'Pink', which I would call flesh colour, so maybe the colours have faded, or maybe it is my monitor, or my eyes, or.........
    5 points
  22. High cocoa content (aka “plain”), adulterated with vegetable oils and milk solids (aka “milk”) or that strange variety known as “white”?
    5 points
  23. In the C19th there were efforts to "standardise" colours in scientific descriptions - such as plant illustration, mineralogy etc - so that learned papers (presumably printed in b & w) which included colour description would be less affected by individual colour perception. [https://journals.openedition.org/1718/1327] "Cet article vise à reconstituer l’élaboration de la nomenclature des couleurs proposant un tableau de 108 couleurs distinctes, publié en 1814" (long article, actually in English). No doubt and unhelpfully, these efforts were not of primary (no pun intended) concern to the 1900s reporters for the Railway Magazine and so we're left with colour descriptions such as "chocolate" which perhaps is a more useful colour description (as the confectionary was already well established) than "lake" (as in "lacquer" not as in "pond"). As Compound2632 has pointed out, lake pigments are organic; they tend towards transparency and, in the longer term, tend to be fugitive. With subjective colour perception, fugitive colours, inexact use of terminology (pigment, colour, hue etc) (but obv not on RMweb), chemical changes from pollution that can change white to black and experimentation by the company, the extent of variables is baffling. However, turning to my favourite and best reference for the period - The Ironmonger 'Hardware Tables' for 1908, I find this under 'Formulae for Mixing Colours': Chocolate Colour - "add lake or carmine to burnt umber, or take Indian red and black to form a brown: then add yellow to bring about the desired shade." So that clears that up then... But I couldn't leave it quite there so I began looking up colour cards from the Edwardian period - couldn't find much, particularly from UK but this one, from USA, stood out for all the wrong reasons: "Chicago House Wrecking Co" [https://archive.org/details/PaintsPriceWreckerNo.118/page/n7/mode/2up] - no, not demolition contractors or children... Kit PW
    5 points
  24. Thanks Mike, quite interesting. It made me curious for more and I found this video from the National Gallery about the chemistry of red lakes and cochineal:
    5 points
  25. A little research turned up this "Penetrant Testing started also in second half of 19th century. The first people who applied the "Oil and Whiting" process for crack detection to railway components are unknown" {History of NDT-Instrumentation: Prof.Dr.-Ing. Volker Deutsch: Wuppertal/Germany] and also, from USA, "Historically penetrant inspection was called the “oil and whiting method” as it used kerosene and a white powder for the inspection of railroad parts. However in the past 40 years the process has been improved tremendously to the point where it is a reliable and accurate inspection technique." [https://worldofndt.com/history-of-non-destructive-testing/] the site gives a resume of testing methods. I'm still not entirely convinced but perhaps, as is commonplace, for instance, in steelwork fabrication, a particular percentage of items are randomly checked from any batch - so one wheel out of however many are in the paintshop is possible: perhaps another couple will be checked before the wagons leave the shop. Kit PW
    5 points
  26. Found it, Man of Yorkshire's Flickr album:
    5 points
  27. When you’re talking GWR it’s shewing, not showing
    5 points
  28. A brilliant and very unusual model. It is refreshing to see such a combination of imaginative design and well engineered construction these days.
    4 points
  29. Yes it's surprisingly difficult to get the look right with this. Here is one from Hockley, which looks rather like the goods depot entrance!
    4 points
  30. One of the 517s with brown and cream bodywork. I'm not sure when the GWR began to adopt 'Halt' rather than 'Halte'. Not sure either when the bodywork was removed - it was only a fleeting fashion.
    4 points
  31. Is it known to the contrary? Just because a few people on RMWeb have developed a pet theory without any evidence at all doesn’t make it historical fact. There has been a general consensus about brown for a number of years. All of a sudden, when no one is around who was alive at the time, people start to question things. Whilst I agree wholeheartedly that the consensus can be wrong, shouting loudly in disagreement without anything to substantiate it does count as evidence against the consensus.
    4 points
  32. Several 517s were painted in chocolate brown, lined yellow-black-yellow, to match the auto coaches which had been painted in brown. They were known as “chocolate soldiers”. (For example references see the WSP book on the Abbotsbury Branch by Jackson.) To me, this provides rather more evidence that brown was actually used between 1908 and 1912 than does the speculation provided that actually it was red. I imagine that the all-over brown looked very nice when fresh, but looked rather too shabby after a couple of years, and that as repaints became due, it was changed to the red.
    4 points
  33. Molesworth's Pocket Book of Engineering Formulae for 1912 gives the following in a very short section about painting: Carriage Painting. "Number of coats, Railway Carriage Painting (L. & N. W. R.) New work: 3 coats white priming; and stop brad holes. 4 coats filling. 1 coat staining and rub down. 1 coat lead colour, stop and face with pumice stone, 2 coats lead colour, 1 coat brown, 2 coats lake, 4 coats varnish. Note! Not more than 1 coat a day, and two days between coats of varnish. Varnish to contain no gold size. Not GWR but the principle of a brown base coat (probably opaque colour) with lake (fairly transparent colour) followed by a good deal of varnish (highly transparent, but not colourless) seems to provide the ex works colour. The concern here, however, seems to be more about the work involved than the colour achieved as the end result. Whilst I'm fascinated by these historical references, I don't think it's providing many answers to the questions of what colour? and when? It slightly reminds me of the joke (I laughed anyway, 40 years ago) about the head chef asking the sous-chef what's in the large cooking pot - "it's bean soup" comes the reply to which the chef responds "I don't care what it's been, what is it now?". Kit PW https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blogs/blog/2502-swan-hill/
    4 points
  34. Rep is an established term in upholstery.
    4 points
  35. Birds of prey: https://www.etymonline.com/word/pounce
    4 points
  36. I don't imagine "Drab" would sell well today under that name This annoucement appears in the May 1909 Railway Magazine, but frustratingly cannot be found in the June issue. I expect it was separate and hasn't been copied over during the digitization. Mind you, it might have been misleading anyway. Modellers of today would find some of their 1900s drawings of GWR locomotives too light green. Also in 1909, the Railway Magazine described the experimentally liveried locos as "lake" or "crimson lake", whilst at the same time calling the coaches "brown", "chocolate" etc. Isn't it ironic, words and drawings/paintings are so subjective and prone to error, yet they are all we have to go on.
    4 points
  37. The Locomotive Magazine, August 1909: "GREAT WESTERN RY. The large passenger engines are now allowed to work up and down to South Wales, via Gloucester. No. 2679, 2-6-0 mineral engine, has been fitted with Mr. Churchward's new pattern of super- heater. No. 2225, 4-4-2 tank, has been painted experimentally chocolate red with yellow lining, and black below the footplate. " Chocolate Red? I think RCTS has this loco painted "Crimson Lake". Are they the same colour?
    4 points
  38. Probably explains the scowl!
    4 points
  39. Can't really help there, that was before my time - mid '80s? That said I've a vague recollection that a 'job lot' of 5-gallon drums of a very deep purply-red/brown paint was either donated or otherwise obtained & was deemed to be near enough so got used. @Western Star might know more.
    4 points
  40. Hi Dana, I've been going through the Railway Magazine for the period again, looking for references to the single-colour GWR coach livery for the whole 1908-1922 period + the associated experiments from 1903 onwards . Here is what I've found so far: July 1903: “All chocolate” (experiments) June 1905: “Brown” (experiments) October 1908: “Chocolate brown”, also “Swindon chocolate” October 1909: “Brown” (differentiating it from the old “chocolate and cream”) April 1915: “Red-chocolate brown”, also “dark red brown” (old choc and cream colour described as “tea-brown”) Sept 1920: “Chocolate brown” Although this is rather limited evidence, I tentatively note three things: 1) It depends who wrote it! 2) There is no mention of an observed livery change around 1912 (that I've found so far). 3) The term "brown" and/or chocolate is recurring - right up to 1920 in fact. Point 1 is very important , I think. We know how subjectively colour is perceived, and in addition some of the writers might just be citing the colour off the cuff without in-depth observation. That said, contemporary observations can have a certain value I think, exactly because they describe how the colour was experienced by the public. Official company descriptions aren't always a good indication (Stroudley's improved engine green!), and a colour might differ significantly between the paint-shop and a grey Monday morning on the platforms at Slough. Point 2 can be seen as an indication that there is either no colour change or only a slight/gradual one, related for example to changing varnishing practices, as discussed above. This could explain the "red-brown" description popping up in 1915, which could be interpreted as the well-known post-1912 lake. However, Point 2 and 3 taken together also raises another possibility that none of us would like to hear and which I am not launching here as some halfbaked new theory - but it deserves mention: The repeated use of the term brown throughout the 1908-1922 period could indicate that the glorious "post-1912" lake colour was in fact more brown than red. Over in the workbench thread, you posted that lovely drawing by W.J. Gordon: It does look "red-brown" on my screen and to my eyes - though more brown than the lovely lake we like (there is that nagging thought again!). The question of course is how much we can trust the colour rendering. On the one hand, here is someone who seemingly made an effort to get it right. On the other hand, there are also locomotive drawings from the period where the colours seem a bit off. Edited to clarify
    4 points
  41. There's been some recent discussion on another thread initiated by magmouse about white tyres... there remains some uncertainty about it. I did wonder when Dave John put his question earlier today whether the colouring was being used as a defect detector - sprays/dyes are still used now for checking castings, forgings and welding for surface defects such as hairline cracks. There are more sophisticated methods of NDT (non destructive testing) but I doubt they were available when that photo was taken. Nevertheless, I 'm not wholly convinced but I can't offer any better explanation! Kit PW
    4 points
  42. I think there’s a garter on the bottom of the lookout and you can see the supporters under the GWRs. So it’s the normal 1908 livery. Remember that with the exception of the special coaches that the GW didn’t use 2 garters on its coaches.
    4 points
  43. It's hard to tell but I think on this 40' PBV there are two garter crests; one under each GWR: It is attached to an LNWR corridor vehicle on a through train. PS: I would speculate that the horse box is also in Crimson Lake particularly as the white roof suggests a recent repaint
    4 points
  44. Many thanks Dana. Yes, I don't know what the GWR were thinking when they placed the insignia that far out on the sides. It was so much more elegant further in, as they did later. Ah yes, where are my manners! Incidentally, there's an interesting variant of the post-1912 livery in Michael Harris' "Great Western Coaches". There is a photo of a Clifton Down set on page 51. The leading coach was not rebuilt to the shewn condition until 1913, yet there are two "GWR"s in the waist band, although one crest is not positioned beneath it. The coach behind it appears to have the "standard" post-1912 livery with one "GWR" in the middle. For those who don't have the Harris book, the photo can be seen - split in two - on Penrhos1920s' site. I can't link directly to the page in question, but they are listed under Dean coaches>Short coaches>Low Roof Coaches, look for dia D27 and E58/C40. Edit: Deleted some ramblings about this photo which were resolved when I found a better version of the image.
    4 points
  45. Hi Khris, I just mixed up my usual GWR brown from Vallejo 984 flat brown and 950 black (used 822 previously but the formula for that one seems to have changed). Whether the prototype brown was different from the two-tone scheme is unclear. Some suggest that it was a deeper/richer shade. Harris in "GW coaches" calls it Chocolate Lake and sounds like he is using an official GWR description, but IIRC I haven't seen anyone else use that term. The visual effect of one all-over colour is quite different from a two-tone scheme, so it would be easy to think that the browns were different even if they weren't. An official GWR record of a change would be the only really reliable evidence, I think. Or a paint sample from an old coach.
    4 points
  46. 2721 and 57xx cab heights were the same - 11'4 5/8", at least for the closed cab version of the 2721. I can't find a dimension for the cab height of an open cab version. There was a lot of cab height variation across the saddle tanks, but I think by pannier days there probably should have been a set dimension - the 2721 kit of parts had become fairly standardised by then I think. Probably the driver for standardising cab heights for closed cabs was the need to interface with bunkers. Boiler pitch for the 2721 and 57xx was the same, at 6'11 3/4" (and standard for most of the large tanks).
    4 points
  47. Lovely build and descriptors Mikkel, thank you for sharing. I have been thinking about that all brown livery for a while for a rescue I have lurking could be just the push I need. Looking forward to your lining and 'photo shoot'.
    4 points
  48. The bottom pic, even in its unlined state, will be just what gwr.org.uk needs to fill that long-missing coach livery gap!
    4 points
  49. Sensational work, Mikkel. It looks stunning. All the best, Nick.
    4 points
This leaderboard is set to London/GMT+01:00
×
×
  • Create New...