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  1. Second bit, room for a few more pics. The tank assembly sits on the two pins soldered onto the cab front. A single screw holds the whole thing together from below the chassis to a threaded hole right up into that solid brass block in the smokebox. A view from underneath, the slight gap between the tank and the boiler will I think vanish when it is all painted black. All still a bit rough,( especially my soldering ) but with a lot of cleaning up I can see that working out quite well. So, bunker and cab floor, then a start on some details.
    25 points
  2. A couple of darker pictures to show the lighting. I think I got it about right, these would be nowhere near as bright as modern stock. They look ok to the eye, but I found it difficult to photograph. Gives an idea anyway. And another just or fun.
    16 points
  3. Mikkel. Your work has often been described as 'inspirational' and for once, I have been inspired actually to do something. I have had this omnibus part-made for some time but your post here has got me going. The kit is very similar to yours but I am not sure of it's origin as there are differences. The roof is cast in the checked pattern which I filed down and filled the holes with some paint to reduce the chunky look. The two mouldings around the waist are cast on my kit. I can't remember the corner joints as I had already made and painted the model. However, I have aded the railings around the top and added a couple of small rollers of brass micro-tube at the top of the luggage hoist; there is a rail around the driver's seat; I have painted a faint gold lining on the mouldings and added 'Great Western Railway'. The latter I culled from a photo of a cast sign, bumped the resolution up to 300dpi then reduced it to 1mm tall and printed it on ivory coloured paper. I have coloured the tyres with an HB pencil, a tip I was given recently and to get the silver in to the lamps I used a very small burr. The horse is temporary, just for the photos. I apologise for the photos. I just cannot take a decent one at the moment, whatever I do. Perhaps it is the poor winter light but I am more inclined to my ineptitude. Thank you, Mikkel.
    15 points
  4. Carrying on ... The sides have the floor section removed and the cantrail fold cut back to 2mm. small brass blocks at cantrail height and a 2mm brass bar at floor level to stiffen it up. Note the holes match up with those tabs. A coat of primer on to seal it all. Then the sides. I mentioned those tabs. Well, they are not brass, but tinplate. Cut from this kind of paper fastener, convenient 5 mm strips of 10 thou tinplate. So with magnets in the holes in the side support bar and in the little blocks at cantrail height I can just attach and remove the sides as many times as I like. Now I can well imagine folk thinking that all that is a lot of messing about. Why not just build the coach , then paint it and line it ? Well, therein lies the problem. I am not good at painting and lining. So, for me being able to do that with the sides on the flat makes the chance of success a bit greater. If I make a mess it is just a side to strip, not a whole coach. Ok, the next three……
    14 points
  5. Manchester London Road (when it looked like a proper station):
    12 points
  6. Another Jenny in full flow, gliding through the building site that will be Hurstmonceux. Apologies for the rather sick making camera work, as the focus on my phone tried to keep up. This Jenny was built from the kit that Chris mentions above, which makes up as a very nice model. Power is in the tender, which has a HighLevel diesel motor bogie with an extra axle squeezed in. No need for an exaggerated mountain of coal. The Jennies lasted well into the 1870s (one made it into the following decade), by which time the wooden boiler lagging had been sheathed in iron and the axle driven pumps had been replaced. Best wishes Eric
    12 points
  7. PS: During a recent bout of the flu I got bored and compiled data from Ian Harrison's 1921 GWR loco allocations book. The idea was to get a feel for the spatial distribution of the 1854 and 2721 classes. This led to the following overview. Wales was clearly a stronghold of both classes in 1921 - but not as exclusively as I thought, with 53% of the 1854s allocated outside Wales in that year. I uploaded the data in an XCEL file to “My Maps” in Google Maps. Hopefully the link below leads to an online version of the map. It can be zoomed, and the class in question can be switched on or off (to avoid overlaps). The pins are just approximate indications of the general area. In some cases I had to adjust the shed name to humour Google (e.g. I‘ve labelled “Branches Fork” shed as Pontnewynydd). https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?mid=1ukwWmwpqiPGZUrZvlm2pHKAHw1JLXtoF&usp=sharing Perhaps the map can be expanded with other classes later on.
    12 points
  8. Aye , the wagons in that Dunblane train almost look as if they have wooden wings over the axleboxes. Strange, and perhaps they are ex SC rather than Caley. Here is a photo of the ballast plough. Made about 15 years back, Basically scribed styrene with 10 thou slaters rod in a groove to look like the half round beading. A bit rough, but ok from a passing glimpse. The footboard has distorted a bit and it could do with a number plate.
    10 points
  9. Many thanks Bill and Nick, glad you like it. Looking at the photos I think the fencing needs some weathering. It's rather stark and black. I considered low walls instead, which would have been pleasing from some angles. But that would also have been rather forbidding, and the fencing has a nice "filter" effect as per Reading's Vastern Rd yard.
    10 points
  10. Ok, a very harsh closeup. Not perfect, but better than I could do by hand.
    10 points
  11. Brassmasters do an etch of the padlocks in the Finney range if you want to recreate that detail. Part E14: https://www.brassmasters.co.uk/gwr_etched_components.htm
    9 points
  12. My version; no.1425 in brown complete with dodgy lining and wrongly place garter crest on the PBV:
    9 points
  13. Not so rare. You can tell it's the brown scheme from the lining and the cream cab insides: RCTS lists all the brown 517's. Most if not all had full cabs and outside bearings to the trailing wheels. Most were probably also autofitted at some time. PS: just the clarify, the lining on green locos was 2 orange lines whereas this has only one. You can see that around the cab the lining is edged in black
    9 points
  14. 92 & 93 are in 'Llangollen Red' as supplied by Williamson's. Having seen an original sample of Lake, I reckon the Llan got it about right. Where it fell down originally IMO was by applying only one topcoat over Williamson's recommended undercoat which is a rather nice red colour but shifts dramatically depending on the lighting conditions. When I repainted 93, it got two coats of Llan Red over a neutral grey undercoat. The original sample had evidence that Swindon used a pink undercoat (probably white lead + lake). Pete S.
    9 points
  15. Alas modelling Newbury must remain a pipe dream for now, but I am planning to take on Welford Park station and military exchange sidings soon - just up the tracks on the old Lambourn Branch. More on that story later! The height of one brick and one line of mortar is 76mm (brick 69mm and mortar 7mm). Your request prompted me to examine the station building in more detail - simple elegance. I have uploaded some photos below to whet your appetite! The large building is indeed the new multi-storey car park, soon to be overshadowed by some even newer flats on the old car park and bus station. Newbury managed to retain its country town feel until electrification, but it is great to see some serious money has been invested in its development. There some interesting documents and maps on the West Berks website.
    9 points
  16. This is the interpretation of the 517 'brown' by Tony Reynalds and Martyn Welch. It is not known whether this locomotive brown has any correlation with what was used on coaching stock.
    8 points
  17. Great to have that selection of pics for comparison on the same page, Mikkel. Thanks. My personal view is that 92 and 93 are probably the preservationists' best yet crimson lake, and that the colour for the Main Line & City stock as first preserved was wrong for crimson lake, but a rather excellent version of 1908 brown.
    8 points
  18. Below is a selection of Flickr photos of Didcot's 3755 (built June 1921) in post-1912 "Crimson Lake" (all taken prior to 2019 when it was repainted in the two-tone livery). I'm putting up a number of them to show different lighting conditions, angles, camera renderings etc. I know preservation liveries can't be used directly, especially if as @K14 says it comes down to a job-lot of donated 5-gallon drums. But the variations in appearance are interesting enough, I think. And the differences compared to the Railmotor and Autotrailer too, perhaps - the latter seem to represent a much redder/purple interpretation than the very brown appearance of 3755. RD16395. GWR Brake 3rd 3755. by Ron Fisher, on Flickr RD16394. GWR Brk 3rd 3755. by Ron Fisher, on Flickr GWR 1921 Churchward Non Corridor Brake 3rd No 3755 by Bob Lovelock, on Flickr GWR Churchward Non-Corridor Brake Third No. 3755, Didcot Railway Centre, circa 1990 by churchward82c, on Flickr Didcot Railway Centre,April 30 2016 by nick B, on Flickr 86F 265 GWR 3755 Moorgate at Didcot Railway Centre by snaebyllej2, on Flickr GWR Brake Third 3755, 18/03/2016, Didcot railway Centre by lee25nash, on Flickr GWR 3755 Churchward Non-Corridor Brake 3rd by Nick Baxter, on Flickr And here, the auto-trailer and railmotor: 92 by Hugh Llewelyn, on Flickr 93 & 92 by Hugh Llewelyn, on Flickr
    8 points
  19. Thanks Duncan. I do like clerestory coaches. I think you were going to print some yourself at one point? Looking forward to see those. Thank you Nick. At first I kept glancing at my Triang-bashed C10 and wondering why I hadn't just done another one like that, but the Slater's kit do make it worthwhile once they're done I think. Thanks Martyn. The Railway Magazine didn't think so! In June 1905 the magazine observed some GWR coaches painted experimentally in all-brown, and wrote: "In the RAILWAY MAGAZINE for August, 1903, page 168, we called attention to the fact that the Great Western Railway was experimenting with deeper shades of the standard colours chosen nearly seventy years ago by Brunel, whose fine artistic taste was never questioned by his most determined enemies. The experiment has developed in a much more pronounced form, and passenger rolling stock is now dinning wholly painted brown and only relieved by gold lining. Doubtless this new development is but a tentative measure called forth by economic considerations, and we therefore refrain from expressing an opinion on the glaring ugliness of the vehicles that are running in the new livery, because we feel sure that the directors of the Great Western Railway will recognise that economy can be purchased too dearly, and that the saving of a few thousands a year in paint can be lost a hundred times over in directions directly traceable to the colour of the rolling stock. Apart from mere opinion, however, the following facts must carry weight. The Great Central, Furness and Caledonian are railways which have, during recent years, abandoned sombre shades of paint, and adopted pleasing colour schemes for the exteriors of their passenger coaches. A portion of the large increase in passenger traffic on these progressive lines can fairly be traced to the improved appearance of the exteriors of the coaches. Why, even the Metropolitan, in making a bid for increased traffic, is abandoning its teak colour for white! The value of an inviting exterior is recognised by every trader, or why are shop fronts to-day so much more imposing than was the practice even ten years ago? The answer is: To attract the attention (and custom) of the man in the street. It is the custom of the man in the street that railways desire, and "to win the eye is to win all!" Westward, the London and South-Western Railway is the Great Western Railway's chief competitor, and the colour adopted by the former line is far preferable to the all brown shades now under trial on the Great Western Railway. Northward, the Great Western Railway meets the London and North-Western Railway, but how will the new colours compare with the pleasing shades that have helped to make the London and North-Western Railway famous? Apart from the monetary question, the directors of the Great Western Railway cannot afford to neglect public sentiment, which has always associated good taste and artistic fitness with the progress of our longest railway, we therefore have little doubt that the experiment will not be persisted in. Perhaps readers of the RAILWAY MAGAZINE will favour us with their views on the subject."
    8 points
  20. I do not like posting where I can say nothing to add or help so I will not post, "Exceptionally clever and original. Wow!"
    8 points
  21. As an afterthought, surface finish in the 1850s wasn;t that great anyway
    8 points
  22. For those that are interested, I have uploaded a photographic retrospective for the exhibition onto the Club's website. http://www.uckfieldmrc.co.uk/exhib21nf.html Regards Adrian
    8 points
  23. Beautifully executed and photographed - it is a splendid trigger for the imagination - I can hear those carts rumbling along the roadway! Thank you for the idea about magnetic fencing usually, feature like this are a real pain when cleaning a layout. You make it look very simple but each of those trees is a work of art in its own right. The whole demonstrates that "small is beautiful" Mike
    8 points
  24. I enjoyed it too! There's already a video from the exhibition online, Sherton Abbas is at 30:16 (and Modbury at 6:40).
    8 points
  25. Simon - thanks! This is the last of the bracket signals to be built and it turned out to be rather difficult. I had to scrap most of the first go - I found some basic setting out errors and it was initially set up with angle cranks for the drive which didn't work at all well. On re-doing it, I used 'compensation' beams - much simpler and more authentic (doh!...why didn't I do that in the first place?). I have yet to fit the ladder (which is made) and it will need some guy wires as it would be unstable in the real world.
    7 points
  26. Ah yes, I do like that photo. What I wouldn't give for a day on that bench. Although in this particular case some of that scene could in fact be recreated, thanks to the preservation movement. Over in the Kernow Railmotor thread, Miss P posted a photo of a railmotor and clerestory 3rd in brown or crimson lake, which has got me thinking that the C10 could also be used for such a train at Farthing. I want to see how the windows on the Kernow railmotor turn out first though. On the subject of rooves during the 1908-22 period, Paddington photos provide interesting views. This is supposedly 1910. Note also stock on the right- and left hand sides. It's interesting how the two-tone livery lingered on in some cases. Below is a Windsor Royal Garden Party train alledgedly in 1913. Stock at the back in brown/crimson lake. You'd be forgiven for speculating that the GWR kept some two-tone stock in hand for certain events!
    7 points
  27. I don't remember from which gallery - probably the National, which you referenced above - but I read an article recently about the scientific retrieval of colour from paintings which have clearly changed colour with time (reds particularly affected). The article suggested that even with the basic chemical/mineral constituents established, the colour could not be sufficiently determined to allow truly "accurate" repair of the painting. I think that there have been attempts to retrieve colours in this way from other things but I suspect that they too may reduce the options but still have speculative outcomes. On the same quest, I did spend some time looking at Victorian and Edwardian paintings which are notorious for presenting what we think of as odd colorizations (?US spelling). It's a pity that WP Frith did not live later or longer as he was extremely concerned about getting the GWR rolling stock in 'The Railway Station' as accurate as possible, which included specially made photos provided by the company. The original version is at the Royal Holloway College (there are other later and smaller versions which he also painted) and is much better in terms of colour than reproductions allow - I was quite surprised when I saw it for real. The painting was 1862: for pre-group/Edwardian modellers, too early a date to offer much in the way of contemporary observation or record. Still, I will continue to keep an eye out in this direction knowing full well that I will label as "reasonably accurate" anything that reinforces my own prejudices and "hopelessy inaccurate" anything that does not. Otherwise, I will follow the receipe in the Ironmonger and "add yellow to bring about the desired shade". Kit PW https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blogs/blog/2502-swan-hill/
    7 points
  28. To put some background to Stephen's comments... I was introduced to Jack through the first edition of the HMRS Livery Register of the GWR. The pamphlet (word chosen deliberately as this edition was circa 64 pages) was a birthday present from my parents so I suppose that this event must have been mid 1960s. At this time the HMRS had an "age" rule... no one under 18 so I had to wait until 1969 before I could become a member and thus able to attend the HMRS meetings in Keen House, London; it was at the London meetings that I met Jack and found that he was able to comment, with apparent authority, upon each and every question that I asked of him. A couple of years later, say 1970-71 period, Jack asked me to accompany him to Swindon where we were to look through the print albums of the C&W works. Jack had this idea that looking into the background of photos would provide him with an insight into the everyday working of the company beyond the official subjects as chosen by those on high. So we walked into the hallowed ground with a nod to the gatekeepers with Jack leading the way to I know not where other than (a) there were racks, boxes, cupboards and cabinets of photos and glass plates... and (b) thosre present greeted Jack as an old friend (and all dressed in the same appareil of tweed jacket, waistcoat and shirt/tie). After several hours of peering through magnifying glasses the "head" of the section announced that lunch beckoned. Not to the canteen, oh no - our guide (the head of the section) took us to a nearby car park from where we went to the guide's home, in Stratton, for lunch. I cannot recall much about the afternoon, my overidding memory of the day is that all those that I met that day had a respect and a regard for Jack which must have been the result of many meetings over many months. Put another way, the C&W part of Swindon seemed to be an open house to Jack. Although not related to Stephen's comments about research and sources there is another story to be told and this story demonstrates - at least to me - that the Old Boys in the works had a pride in what they had achieved and were willing to share their pride with those who were starting on the long road of preservation. In the mid 1970s the GWS had completed the restoration of Cookham Manor and had asked Swindon to weigh the engine. So early in the morning we set of from Didcot, I was lucky enough to ride on the footplate. After the engine had been taken to the weigh house those of us from Didcot were given carte blanche to explore the works. I talked to many who had worked on steam and some of those men made small gestures about what could be seen (read as found) by visiting specific shops and discrete areas of the stacking grounds. Clearly word had got round about our visit and many men had taken the opportunity to walk past the weigh house to see Cookham. Not only had those men a desire to see a live example of their past work, one or two of them passed "redundant" assets into our care; for "redundant assets" read "steam loco spares". Gudgeon pins were no longer seen as door stops, they were offered for the future... valve rods were no longer make weights in crane tenders, they were passed over as necessary parts for those engines emerging from Barry. Maybe after forty years those acts of kindness with pride appear as such when seen through rose-tinted glasses. To me that day is just the same as the visit with Jack. regards, Graham
    7 points
  29. Thanks, Northroader, that is a wonderful website! I loved the other models as well. The classical architecture used by 1830s railways is one of the attractions of period modelling for me. The Tudor and Gothic trends that followed are architecturally interesting, but to me the clean lines of classical designs look much more elegant. The Dublin and Kingstown Railway did have some wonderful architectural features, as shown on this lithograph from 1834: The Dublin and Kingstown Railway would be relatively easy to model, as it was originally a standard gauge line and the Bachmann John Bull loco (shown in my diorama photos with its leading bogie removed) could be bashed into one of the line's first locos. The atmospheric extension to Dalkey was actually quite successful for a while, and early steam locos would have struggled to cope with the gradients on this section of the line. The Kingstown station is quite attractive: On the subject of early railway architecture, I've always thought the SER's first Tunbridge Wells station (drawn by John Bourne in the 1840s) would make a wonderful compact model:
    7 points
  30. I think an accurate analysis of a period road vehicle is totally relevant to the study of model railways. These carriages were expensive and would have been maintained and used throughout the 19th century so it is of use to all of us pre-grouping modellers. As you say , this one is thought to have lasted till 1906. We put a lot of effort into getting period details of rolling stock and buildings right, information such as this is wonderful.
    7 points
  31. Many thanks Scott. The extension has already been fitted and re-fitted many times and seems to be holding up well, so I'm encouraged to experiment with a similar method for joining layout modules. Enjoyed and desired, but not accessible to all of course. I've been looking at Frank Holl's paintings recently, sombre stuff... Frank Holl - The Song Of The Shirt [1874] by Gandalf's Gallery, on Flickr
    7 points
  32. Interesting information and thoughts about the colour of fencing, many thanks. My understanding was that GWR spear fencing was black in goods yards, but I need to check up on the source. This is Leamington, but that would be the station area I think:
    7 points
  33. They are nice little structures, aren't they? The small wooden offices seen in some larger goods yards are rarely described in the GWR literature. I may have shown these two before, at Bristol Temple Meads. One of them was supposed to go in front of the stable block, but sometimes less is more. The cartage office is still on my build list, just need to find the right spot for it.
    7 points
  34. Lovely. Gives good depth to the whole scene.
    7 points
  35. I was wondering about that difference in the raves. The one on the tippler has the planks fitted close together, which I don't recall seeing so often. Perhaps for a finer size of coke? Anyway, a search for Bradwell Wood led me to the D299 thread - I should have known that such a good photo wouldn't have escaped that thread. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/113035-more-pre-grouping-wagons-in-4mm-the-d299-appreciation-thread/&do=findComment&comment=3770771 PS: I also searched for "coke raves", but that led to a whole different ball game! I expect Google will start serving me adverts for Ibiza now.
    7 points
  36. You mentioned nuts. I did a test build of a DD3 tank wagon in 4mm for Taff Vale Models and made one or two additions including nuts on the end of the diagonal braces. I used 16BA nuts. I have attached a picture and leave you to judge their suitability. The diagonal brace is 0.5mm nickel silver rod so the nut slips easily over th end, held with a minute dab of glue. There should be two but my supply of nuts is low so I economised. The second, lock nut, would have been thinner, so just file it down. Unfortunately, 16BA nuts are like hens' teeth at the moment but when they become available again, would someone please let me know??
    7 points
  37. Excellent work Mikkel, the wagons look great and thanks for the link to my 7mm efforts If you want to have a go fading the writing on Slaters wagons with a fibreglass brush, paint the sides with varnish first and allow to dry. The varnish seals the lettering in place, but the fibreglass bristles wear this away very progressively and allow some subtle distressing/fading. Best wishes Dave
    7 points
  38. Julian here from Taff Vale Models. I've been reading this thread with interest. Those kit builds are superb and I look forward to seeing the painted models. I would like to mention that the length of the model from the U9 kit we sell is, as it should be, approximately a scale foot shorter than that of the R2 from the same range and is not a case of "creative" marketing . I also agree that the photo's on the website are not clear, this is something I am slowly addressing across the range within our online shop. Having said that, I feel that the profile error on the existing U9 etch is unacceptable and with that in mind the kit will be withdrawn from sale in its current form. In order to address this in the longer term, I am in the process of drawing up a new version 7mm/ft. kit for this type and may well release a 4mm/ft. version too if there is interest. Just to prove it, here is one of the new coach sides I am working on: I'll be making changes to the chassis design, lamp irons and other details as the kit develops. So I don't hijack this thread, I'll start a new one on this subject once I have something on my workbench. I have had a request for a U10 as well so currently mulling that over. Morgantown Crecent!
    7 points
  39. I made some bar frames for a 7mm scale Schenectady 2-6-0 but rather than risk what happened to Northroader I drilled, fretted and filed them from steel plate. It took ages and a lot of effort but enabled me to solder in frame spacers, motion plates etc. without ending up with a collection of bits. I think that 5 & 9's model is looking splendid. I have been meaning to make an 1848 Jenny Lind for decades now but have only got as far as machining the boiler fittings. Maybe watching this thread will spur me into action? Dave
    6 points
  40. Re. worn seats: From my commuting experience I would say lighter, but that may depend on the nature of fabric and its original/undyed colour. Or maybe this is one of those situations where the question is not how it looked in reality, but how it looks most convincing in model form? If so I would first try dry-brushed lighter. Re. 1908-1922 liveries. The issue of how different shades and varnish practices appear in daily operation has reminded me of the DSB "Maroon" livery (sic, the English term was used), which was known to enthusiasts as "Wine Red". This preserved example represents the "official" look: But amongst the ordinary public is was typically just described as "brown". Indeed I remember conversations about how dull it was. This photo illustrates my own recollection and is fairly kind, i.e. a not too dirty example. Below is the maroon livery again but contrasted with the subsequent "Red" livery on the coaches at the back. While the maroon was different from the GWR's "crimson lake" you can see how members of the public - and a staff writer at the Railway Magazine - might come away with a perception of "brown" when observing liveries of this type in everyday operation. Edited to avoid confusion about DSB livery dates, as these were not the same for all stock.
    6 points
  41. It won't be half as ambitious as your impressive building programme. But considering the location of Farthing on the Berks & Hants extension... ... there is in principle scope for quite a varied selection of trains! I've had a first look at the 1911 Working Timetable for the Newbury-Westbury section, sourced from Michael Clemens' useful website, and it's all a bit overwhelming, especially for someone who is used to very small layouts. Disregarding the actual timetable and formations for a moment, I'd like to start off with some more clerestory stock. That will include the Slater's kits, and some short bogie clerestories from the old Fourmil range. I also have a few more of these, the ex-Wheeltappers kits which were pre-printed but in this particular livery worked quite well I think. I had better do some planning!
    6 points
  42. Hi Pete, yes I agree the compressed version would probably have worked well. Below is my attempt at the compressed version (61 cms in 4mm scale) compared to the original one. But I just feel like a challenge really, going outside my comfort zone to build a large structure. And there's the bonus of having not only a station for Farthing, but also a model of an actual prototype. As with the Park Royal stable block. Excellent photos Nick, they would certainly be useful if it's not too much trouble. Many thanks for the offer!
    6 points
  43. I'll never tire of shots like that. For the new modules the idea is to expand on the idea used on the Branch Bay (a.k.a. Module 1), whereby the canopy is at the front so that the viewer is directly in the scene and can look under the canopy to see the action. The canopy on the branch bay platform was made with modified Ratio components. The supporting pillars are (more or less) the correct pattern for Newbury, as seen in the crop below.
    6 points
  44. Ah yes, they look superb. As you say it does add a good deal of authenticity to the models. I haven't done my SER wagons as you can see but I did apply it to my early Brighton cattle wagon. It took a bit of courage slapping white paint all over a perfectly presentable model but it was worth it in the end. Chris
    6 points
  45. You could always bring the rake of 7mm versions along for the weekend as well, Sherton would welcome an S&D excursion train
    6 points
  46. Been making buffers for the locos this weekend. Starting with short lengths of 4mm Square section brass rod cut to about 8mm fitted in the 4 jaw self centring chuck then milled the base to 1.5mm. This is a watch makers mill for making pivots and spigots. They come in .1mm sizes from .4mm to 2.4mm or at least they're the sizes I have although I have lost the 1.1.mm. Just run over the section all done in 10 seconds. 4 jaw chuck off. Buffer turned round now mounted in a 1.5mm collet and first part off the excess. Excess cut off Find the centre with a 2mm ball bur this will give me a good start later. Now I have turned down the shank. Next drill out the centre to fit the buffer head I drill only as deep as the base of the buffer. Now change drill for a .6mm and drill the rest of the way through the shank it has a bit of spit on the drill to prevent the drill sticking and snapping. Buffers ready for the bolt holes to be put in.
    6 points
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