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Oxford N7

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I shouldn't worry about blackened tyrels not picking up power. The metal is oxidised which shouldn't affect current flow.

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Well, that was easier than I expected!  Couplings sorted.  Although there was a certain amount of trial and error to find the right sizes etc.

 

The front body retaining screw hole (hidden beneath the NEM pocket) accepts 10BA bolts, although it would be surprising if it actually is 10BA.  So a short Bachmann sure-fitting coupling (36-025) can be screwed into it.  It needs a short piece of tube over the bolt as a spacer.  I used brass tube, but plastic would be easier if you had any suitable.  The ideal length for the spacer tube turned out to be 4mm, while the bolt was cut to about 7mm long.   The result being that the bar of the coupling is now a lot nearer to the buffer heads than it used to be!  The front coupling is no longer 'flexibly mounted' which might cause problems on train set curves, but so far hasn't on my layout.  It doesn't involve any modification to the loco at all, so you could revert to the original arrangement if you needed to, as long as you don't lose the original fixing screw.

 

IMG_3060.jpg.7219c8f633ee7040aed1aa0e33b4fcc3.jpgIMG_3061.jpg.4d66377dd422e2e030848bfef93b46e0.jpgIMG_3062.jpg.b374ca5a908bae6bbdc01e0d8b71ef16.jpg

 

At the back end, I used a short Bachmann NEM type coupling (from 36-030) in the original pocket, as the Bachmann hook is shorter than the original one.  I was able to shorten the pocket by 4mm, and took a similar amount off the coupling tails.  To retain the coupling in the pocket, I drilled through both and passed a pin through the hole, cut off and bent over underneath.  If using a pin the hole needs to be countersunk at the top of the pocket, so that it will still fit up flush to the chassis, or glue could be used instead.  Again, the coupling is a lot closer to the buffers than it originally was; ideally perhaps it could be shorter still but there's not much left to cut off!

 

IMG_3064.jpg.4fd5140fad623b6df1314fecaf589681.jpg

 

IMG_3063.jpg.14301f07446a915b64ba3c447ab0d7c7.jpg

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Rails of Sheffield must have them in stock. I've just had an email stating that they have taken my payment.

 

Stewart

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1 hour ago, 31A said:

Well, that was easier than I expected!  Couplings sorted.  Although there was a certain amount of trial and error to find the right sizes etc.

 

The front body retaining screw hole (hidden beneath the NEM pocket) accepts 10BA bolts, although it would be surprising if it actually is 10BA.  So a short Bachmann sure-fitting coupling (36-025) can be screwed into it.  It needs a short piece of tube over the bolt as a spacer.  I used brass tube, but plastic would be easier if you had any suitable.  The ideal length for the spacer tube turned out to be 4mm, while the bolt was cut to about 7mm long.   The result being that the bar of the coupling is now a lot nearer to the buffer heads than it used to be!  The front coupling is no longer 'flexibly mounted' which might cause problems on train set curves, but so far hasn't on my layout.  It doesn't involve any modification to the loco at all, so you could revert to the original arrangement if you needed to, as long as you don't lose the original fixing screw.

 

IMG_3060.jpg.7219c8f633ee7040aed1aa0e33b4fcc3.jpgIMG_3061.jpg.4d66377dd422e2e030848bfef93b46e0.jpgIMG_3062.jpg.b374ca5a908bae6bbdc01e0d8b71ef16.jpg

 

At the back end, I used a short Bachmann NEM type coupling (from 36-030) in the original pocket, as the Bachmann hook is shorter than the original one.  I was able to shorten the pocket by 4mm, and took a similar amount off the coupling tails.  To retain the coupling in the pocket, I drilled through both and passed a pin through the hole, cut off and bent over underneath.  If using a pin the hole needs to be countersunk at the top of the pocket, so that it will still fit up flush to the chassis, or glue could be used instead.  Again, the coupling is a lot closer to the buffers than it originally was; ideally perhaps it could be shorter still but there's not much left to cut off!

 

IMG_3064.jpg.4fd5140fad623b6df1314fecaf589681.jpg

 

IMG_3063.jpg.14301f07446a915b64ba3c447ab0d7c7.jpg

 

 

Nicely done :) although you make it look easy it makes me wonder more why Oxford couldn't do it.

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14 minutes ago, Bucoops said:

 

 

Nicely done :) although you make it look easy it makes me wonder more why Oxford couldn't do it.

 

Thank you; it WAS quite easy.  I wondered too, but perhaps they thought rolling stock should have NEM coupling fittings these days rather than screw fitted tension locks?

 

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An entirely gratuitous photo of the front three quarter view, including quite a lot of plumbing for a British loco. Nice and weighty without traction tyres. I'm impressed by the general finish and the abundance of freestanding parts. Along with other fittings in the cab, the backhead detail has all been moulded and painted neatly and even the stripes on the boiler sight glass are painted in! From outside it's a lovely model of a nice prototype. I'm looking forward to broadening its back-to-backs to 16.5mm :-)

 

Oxford_N7_69612_IMG_20191016_231905_sml.jpg

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It looks very much like what's needed here is a coupling moulded with integral NEM fitting, saving the length of the socket entirely.  A standard socket could easily be substituted by those wishing to use alternative couplings.

 

 

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I've just been looking at some pictures of real N7s, and wondering whether this crank and lever on the side of the smokebox pertains to the condensing gear which some of these engines were at one time fitted, and as such is superfluous on this BR condition model?

 

IMG_3061.jpg.f3cbef2fc58b0d516fe038909cc14546.jpg

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Just now, 31A said:

I've just been looking at some pictures of real N7s, and wondering whether this crank and lever on the side of the smokebox pertains to the condensing gear which some of these engines were at one time fitted, and as such is superfluous on this BR condition model?

 

IMG_3061.jpg.f3cbef2fc58b0d516fe038909cc14546.jpg

The crank and lever worked the valve that actuated the condensing gear (source: RCTS 'Locomotives of the LNER' part 9a, p105), so yes, it would have been long gone by BR days.

 

D

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30 minutes ago, 31A said:

I've just been looking at some pictures of real N7s, and wondering whether this crank and lever on the side of the smokebox pertains to the condensing gear which some of these engines were at one time fitted, and as such is superfluous on this BR condition model?

 

IMG_3061.jpg.f3cbef2fc58b0d516fe038909cc14546.jpg

 

The GERS drawing calls it the condensing operating lever. 

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17 hours ago, Bucoops said:

... it makes me wonder more why Oxford couldn't do it.

Designer inexperience I think. There is space enough to accommodate the front pocket locator further back to achieve the NEM specified position relative to the buffer faces. (Yes, it would foul the brake gear representation there, so that would need to be unclipped before the pocket could come out to allow body removal.) But read on:

 

8 hours ago, Flying Pig said:

It looks very much like what's needed here is a coupling moulded with integral NEM fitting, saving the length of the socket entirely.  A standard socket could easily be substituted by those wishing to use alternative couplings.

As I have been reminded elsewhere, that's the NEM363, and it would have been particularly useful applied to the rear coupling; so the option of applying this both front and rear might have been sensible.

 

But to date in RTR OO only the now departed from the UK scene Vitrains have ever offered a tension lock with this fitting, so it would be a unique fitting coupler to Oxford Rail, amongst currently active manufacturers. Useful alternative RTR couplers such as the Kadee don't support it, and most of us are going to be somewhat ignorant of what the HO manufacturers offer in this fitting: I think I have seen the Fleischmann profi coupler in this fitting, and that was by chance...

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12 hours ago, readingtype said:

An entirely gratuitous photo of the front three quarter view, including quite a lot of plumbing for a British loco. Nice and weighty without traction tyres. I'm impressed by the general finish and the abundance of freestanding parts. Along with other fittings in the cab, the backhead detail has all been moulded and painted neatly and even the stripes on the boiler sight glass are painted in! From outside it's a lovely model of a nice prototype. I'm looking forward to broadening its back-to-backs to 16.5mm :-)

 

Oxford_N7_69612_IMG_20191016_231905_sml.jpg

 

Looking at that close up it definitely needs etched plates. Available from 247 Developments and others.

 

 

Apart from that and some "issues" that some might experience with the over long TL couplings (don't use them myself), it seems Oxford are learning from some of their past mistakes. Put it this way, it's the first OR locomotive that I'm tempted to buy and probably will at some point.

 

 

Jason

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2 hours ago, Darryl Tooley said:

The crank and lever worked the valve that actuated the condensing gear (source: RCTS 'Locomotives of the LNER' part 9a, p105), so yes, it would have been long gone by BR days.

 

D

 

2 hours ago, Bucoops said:

 

The GERS drawing calls it the condensing operating lever. 

 

Thanks both; thought as much!  It looks as though it should be easy enough to remove - it seems that the smokebox is plastic, while the boiler itself is die cast.

 

In a similar vein, there seems to be a representation of the front of the reversing rod ahead of the side tanks on both sides, whereas it should only be on the right hand side (looking forwards).  From reading the relevant RCTS book, it appears this batch of N7s (N7/1) was always right hand drive, which corresponds with the model's other details.  Not sure how this will work out when they bring out the announced 69670, which I believe should be left hand drive.

 

Hopefully the above doesn't sound hyper critical as I am very pleased with the model.  On closer investigation, another good feature is that the leading axle is sprung, which no doubt accounts for its reliable electrical contact!

 

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My N7 has also had it’s couplings modified to get a closer distance between buffers. I used the Bachman ‘short’ coupling as a basis for the mod.

7834AA81-8F1F-47EC-B928-9E160DF567BE.jpeg

16C00304-2C4F-43A9-AA3F-C175A1E4AA04.jpeg

5A2FEED9-1441-439F-AF51-75EFC2038154.jpeg

8B2DB7AD-93F4-420B-B7C3-9ED0E4690D3A.jpeg

F73B1AB0-18AA-4D1A-86B9-BDF60CCADA57.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Martin_R said:

My N7 has also had it’s couplings modified to get a closer distance between buffers. I used the Bachman ‘short’ coupling as a basis for the mod.

 

 

 

 

 

That's very neat Martin; you've done better than me!  I may give that a try.

 

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Very pleased with the model and as I'm modeling Colchester c1955 it appears Oxford have fitted a Colchester shed plate, although it was a Parkston engine at the time, not going to Colchester until later in its life when by then it carried the later crest.

 

I've removed the bits not required mentioned above and being very picky the cab roof is wrong, but don't propose to alter it and as mentioned elsewhere, the chimney may not be correct for this loco in the period modelled.

 

As with the GE livered version I have, it runs very well and is very powerful.

 

Paul

 

 

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A picture of 69612 at King's Cross (undated) in "The Book of the Great Northern" Part One certainly shows it with a GE chimney.  I may have an old Wills one somewhere in my spares box .... 

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I really like this loco, I was wondering if anyone can tell me what rtr coaching stock could I use it with to represent a BR ex GE region suburban or country train. Just thinking of layout ideas! 

Steve.

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1 hour ago, sb67 said:

... I was wondering if anyone can tell me what rtr coaching stock could I use it with to represent a BR ex GE region suburban or country train. Just thinking of layout ideas! 

Hornby offer three each of Gresley and Thompson designs of non-gangwayed, simplest option from RTR and happily all of them very good models. To date only available in teak or BR crimson, but pretty appropriate since steam departed the GE section pretty early, few of these would have had a maroon repaint. Also BR's 57' mk1 non gangwayed from Bachmann, not quite as refined as the Hornby models.

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I saw this interesting article on Facebook in the “Jazz Service” group posted by Richard Matz, who may be on here somewhere, if so thanks.  It is an appreciation of the N7 written by the wonderful Dick Hardy under a pseudonym. Enjoy.
 

N7%20-%20Obituary%20for%20an%20outstandi

 

//Simon

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3 minutes ago, Stentor said:

I saw this interesting article on Facebook in the “Jazz Service” group posted by Richard Matz, who may be on here somewhere, if so thanks.  It is an appreciation of the N7 written by the wonderful Dick Hardy under a pseudonym. Enjoy.
 

N7%20-%20Obituary%20for%20an%20outstandi

 

//Simon

Can you check the link please.

Not showing on my 'puter.

Bernard

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1 hour ago, sb67 said:

I really like this loco, I was wondering if anyone can tell me what rtr coaching stock could I use it with to represent a BR ex GE region suburban or country train. Just thinking of layout ideas! 

Steve.

I recall as a child going to Clacton/Walton by train c. 1959.  From were the train was split the portion I was travelling in was hauled by an N7. The stock was mostly if not all Gresley in both blood and custard and maroon.

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44 minutes ago, Stentor said:

I saw this interesting article on Facebook in the “Jazz Service” group posted by Richard Matz, who may be on here somewhere, if so thanks.  It is an appreciation of the N7 written by the wonderful Dick Hardy under a pseudonym. Enjoy.
 

N7%20-%20Obituary%20for%20an%20outstandi

 

//Simon

 

That was fun to read. It brought a tear to my eye at the end. Thanks for posting it. 

(There are 7 pages if you follow the link in the post above)

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1 hour ago, 34theletterbetweenB&D said:

Hornby offer three each of Gresley and Thompson designs of non-gangwayed, simplest option from RTR and happily all of them very good models. To date only available in teak or BR crimson, but pretty appropriate since steam departed the GE section pretty early, few of these would have had a maroon repaint. Also BR's 57' mk1 non gangwayed from Bachmann, not quite as refined as the Hornby models.

They have done them in maroon, R4649 is the Gresley lavatory composite and the others all have R46xx numbers. I think Hornby may have called them crimson but they are much darker than the R45xx crimson releases.

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I should have pointed out that the stock on the Walton/Clacton service was gangwayed stock.

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