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What size is your screen Mickler? The roof board mounting brackets aren't scotch mist....

If you can see anything other than the remains of the Hornby moulding in the last photo (7799) posted it must be a lot bigger than yours  :jester:  :jester:

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It appears that I inadvertently misled when I claimed that the next train in the sequence was to be a coal train. It turned out that it was the last one I had run - long gone bfore it could be photographed. The next trian however was a KX Goods - New England Class H mixed empties, which does contain some minerals, albeit without coal, except for the bits left lying in the bottom of the wagons, which of course can't be seen. Anyway, I hope this one may be accepted as a substitute.

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The Down slow is not the easiest place for photography. I have calculated that the ideal vantage point would be about three feet away on the opposite side from where I took these. As that would leave me hanging in thin air a good twenty feet above the ground, I have decided against it, so these will have to do.

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All in all I'm not too unhappy with how it looks, though Irfanview has decided to make my lining look even more wonky than it really is.

 

Horses for courses.  Are you trying to produce ultra-perfect showcase models, that will only be viewed in closeup under a spotlight? 

Or if you're building/converting stock to run in trains on an operational layout, you need a finish that looks good in that context, as your models most definitely do!

All the best,

Dave.

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It appears that I inadvertently misled when I claimed that the next train in the sequence was to be a coal train. It turned out that it was the last one I had run - long gone bfore it could be photographed. The next trian however was a KX Goods - New England Class H mixed empties, which does contain some minerals, albeit without coal, except for the bits left lying in the bottom of the wagons, which of course can't be seen. Anyway, I hope this one may be accepted as a substitute.

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The Down slow is not the easiest place for photography. I have calculated that the ideal vantage point would be about three feet away on the opposite side from where I took these. As that would leave me hanging in thin air a good twenty feet above the ground, I have decided against it, so these will have to do.

Hi Gilbert

 

Very nice photos especially the last one, it give a nice panoramic view across PN.

 

May I ask do you use a tripod to support your camera when you take your photos, as I assume you use a high apature number and slow shutter speed to get maximum focal length of your layout.

 

Regards

 

David

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Gilbert, I am totally blown away with that work on the coach considering it is the very first or maybe the first one done for ages. What a start mate; brilliant stuff. It is coming to life and things like roof brackets and other small fittings will be fun to sort out as will the glazing. I really hope this is giving you the confidence to start those Tripelots and if so, do check the positioning of the lettering on the Kitchen car in particular. I'm told it varied between sets!

Ref the grabs and the door handles, they were sodered on by me (should I apologise?) and it could be worth experimenting in the future with gluing them in after painting? I've forgotten what various folk have told me in the past.

It would be useful if you have any thoughts on things that could have been left to do after lining or maybe more things that could have been done (the body shell to underframe fitting 'device' for example, or perhaps brackets).

Duck. (Away in sunny Somerset and waiting to see GWR stuff at the WSR on Wednesday......)

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Normally i complete a coach before spraying it and scrape handles down to brass afterwards, but in the case of Gresley stock it is easier to drill through the glazing and pop in the door and grab handles (held by a touch of Loctite) after the coach is completed. This way one has a clear run with the lining out.

Edited by coachmann
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Horses for courses.  Are you trying to produce ultra-perfect showcase models, that will only be viewed in closeup under a spotlight? 

Or if you're building/converting stock to run in trains on an operational layout, you need a finish that looks good in that context, as your models most definitely do!

All the best,

Dave.

You are quite right of course. These are what Tony Wright would call "layout coaches", a pragmatic approach to the need for a ridiculous amount of rolling stock, and to be viewed passing by from a distance. Rather slower than Stoke Summit of course, and they do stop sometimes, though often hidden under the overall roof. Thanks for reminding me, and for your kind comments.

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Hi Gilbert

 

Very nice photos especially the last one, it give a nice panoramic view across PN.

 

May I ask do you use a tripod to support your camera when you take your photos, as I assume you use a high apature number and slow shutter speed to get maximum focal length of your layout.

 

Regards

 

David

Hi David,

 

Most of my photos are taken from rail or platform height, with the camera just placed on a piece of card to keep it level. I then set 5 seconds delay so that if I shake the camera a bit when pressing the shutter it has time to settle down before firing.  Anything more adventurous than that, and out comes the tripod. I use the highest aperture the camera will allow, which is f8, most of the time, but the shutter speed depends on the light coming in, and can vary from 1/600th of a second to eight seconds, sometimes within a few seconds!

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Really like that last set of images Gilbert, I can just imagine the Dub D clanking slowly along and the sound of all those four wheelers over the rail joins. Which brings me to something I've been thinking about lately.

 

I've been interested in Larry's latest conundrums re the noise on layouts as I actually enjoy the sound that the whole train makes on my layout. I have noticed the big difference between the ballasted and unballasted sections though and wondered if it was too loud in places, though I actually left slightly larger gaps in some of my rail joins deliberately wider to enhance the wheel click sounds. When I was in the UK in 2011 I did some sound recording on the NYMR when they were running on the Battersea line. One recording which really stuck out for me was when 44767 was coasting downhill near Glaisdale. The noise of the train was quite a roar and the sound of the loco wheels hitting the rail joins at a decent clip was amazing. Something that would take quite a bit of technology to replicate in DCC methinks.

 

Cheers

Tony

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Gilbert, I am totally blown away with that work on the coach considering it is the very first or maybe the first one done for ages. What a start mate; brilliant stuff. It is coming to life and things like roof brackets and other small fittings will be fun to sort out as will the glazing. I really hope this is giving you the confidence to start those Tripelots and if so, do check the positioning of the lettering on the Kitchen car in particular. I'm told it varied between sets!

Ref the grabs and the door handles, they were sodered on by me (should I apologise?) and it could be worth experimenting in the future with gluing them in after painting? I've forgotten what various folk have told me in the past.

It would be useful if you have any thoughts on things that could have been left to do after lining or maybe more things that could have been done (the body shell to underframe fitting 'device' for example, or perhaps brackets).

Duck. (Away in sunny Somerset and waiting to see GWR stuff at the WSR on Wednesday......)

I reckon the last coach I tried to line would be a Kitmaster MK1 about 55 years ago, so I am a bit out of practice. I'm relieved that you don't feel that I've messed up all your good work. A question regarding the triplets though. How do I get into them to do the interiors? I don't want to start pulling at them too hard, but nothing seems to give under gentle persuasion. I've found a nice shot of the very first triplet set in maroon, so I think we'll do it as that one.

 

Anyway, enjoy your holiday, we can sort things when you get back. Those Bill Bedford RSP sides arrived by the way.

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Ref noise - on my last layout we cut little notches i the rail at 12" intervals to give the equivalent of 60' sale gaps -a rake of eight Wrenn Pullmans - all metal wheeled, made a lovely noise clickety clacking along the main line

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Hi David,

 

Most of my photos are taken from rail or platform height, with the camera just placed on a piece of card to keep it level. I then set 5 seconds delay so that if I shake the camera a bit when pressing the shutter it has time to settle down before firing.  Anything more adventurous than that, and out comes the tripod. I use the highest aperture the camera will allow, which is f8, most of the time, but the shutter speed depends on the light coming in, and can vary from 1/600th of a second to eight seconds, sometimes within a few seconds!

Hi Gilbert

 

A friend of mine use to use a small bean bag as a support for his camera when taking shots at eye level on layouts.

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'Tripelets'. They are done the Comet way and there are two slotted bolt heads each end of the underside of the underframe and you undo them. The whole body shell then comes away easily.

You may have to remove the bogies for access to these bolt heads and if you do just note the bogie positions and replace in the same position (also just note the orientation of the body shells to their underframes and once again, refit as removed (due to non symmetry of underframes). I think I marked them up but can't remember.

ATB

Quackers.

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