Jump to content

jonny777

Prototype for everything corner.

Recommended Posts

On 14/08/2019 at 16:51, Fat Controller said:

It also seems to run on an overhead power supply, though I can't see how that works when the vessel's been turned.

 AFAK this beast is a ship lift, not a turntable.  The ship enters it as if it was a lock from the lower section of the canal, and is then carried up an incline to the higher section, where it continues it's progress.  The lift does not revolve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, The Johnster said:

 AFAK this beast is a ship lift, not a turntable.  The ship enters it as if it was a lock from the lower section of the canal, and is then carried up an incline to the higher section, where it continues it's progress.  The lift does not revolve.

image.png.ac7a352cb3af69742434f672478bf7f8.png

 

The lift is revolved, whatever connects to the overhead wire must retract in some way, the platforms the connectors inhabit are still in a raised position when the lift turns.

 

it is an amazing contraption.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, The Johnster said:

 AFAK this beast is a ship lift, not a turntable.  The ship enters it as if it was a lock from the lower section of the canal, and is then carried up an incline to the higher section, where it continues it's progress.  The lift does not revolve.

 

Lol, watch video, then comment ;) 

 

Looks like there's a gap in the over head power where it joins the turntable, but there's 2 sets of pantographs so there's always 1 set in contact with the wires.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe it uses a large stay-alive...…….?

 

:D

  • Funny 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Satan's Goldfish said:

 

Lol, watch video, then comment ;) 

 

Looks like there's a gap in the over head power where it joins the turntable, but there's 2 sets of pantographs so there's always 1 set in contact with the wires.

There is also a stabling siding for the cradle when not in use, which can be seen in the google maps shot.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, The Johnster said:

 AFAK this beast is a ship lift, not a turntable.  The ship enters it as if it was a lock from the lower section of the canal, and is then carried up an incline to the higher section, where it continues it's progress.  The lift does not revolve.

You obviously didn't watch the video or go to the Google Maps link I posted else you would have seen exactly what it is.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have trouble with your cat knocking expensive models on the floor, causing damage which prevents you from having the loco on your layout?

 

Worry no more, because it happened on the real railway too (well maybe not caused by the station cat). 

 

Here is D16 62589 at Cambridge in 1951. 

 

 

502139947_62589damage1951.jpg.0569bf63a2aec032e6ef6fe9b382b4f8.jpg

 

  • Like 8
  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, jonny777 said:

Do you have trouble with your cat knocking expensive models on the floor, causing damage which prevents you from having the loco on your layout?

 

Worry no more, because it happened on the real railway too (well maybe not caused by the station cat). 

 

Here is D16 62589 at Cambridge in 1951. 

 

 

502139947_62589damage1951.jpg.0569bf63a2aec032e6ef6fe9b382b4f8.jpg

 

That's quite a nudge (referencing another topic)

Any idea how it happened?

It's even peeled back part of the running plate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Possibly a sidelong collision between two locos moving around the shed on converging roads. It wasn't uncommon. Often the firemen were off the engines setting the road ahead with both drivers on the blind sides of their engines.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, melmerby said:

That's quite a nudge (referencing another topic)

Any idea how it happened?

It's even peeled back part of the running plate.

 

 

Sadly, no notes with the photo and it is pure guesswork; but my thoughts were that the corner of another loco's tender could have produced that damage at that height when shuttling around the shed roads, as LMS2968 says.  

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chairs moved while your handbuilt track sets?P1150568.JPG.fc410f2acefd9c0176315ad67268c792.JPG

 

LT tracks at Stratford 2014.

 

Dave

  • Like 11
  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you need a bit of a talking point on your railway street scene? 

 

How about a lorry embedded in the newsagents window? 

 

 

lorry_crash_cambridge_21:5:52.JPG.224ea7068cfd9266366706105c8d2db0.JPG

 

 

 

21st May 1952. Magdalene Street, Cambridge. 

 

 

  • Like 10
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Porkscratching said:

Jeez..I bet Mr Clark was a bit pi$$ed off that morning...

I shouldn't think the driver was too happy either - looks like his side took the impact.

 

The view hasn't changed much in 67 years:

https://goo.gl/maps/6ro1u5SZATAaRMF16

Edited by melmerby
  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 26/08/2019 at 19:18, unravelled said:

Chairs moved while your handbuilt track sets?P1150568.JPG.fc410f2acefd9c0176315ad67268c792.JPG

 

LT tracks at Stratford 2014.

 

Dave

Poor choice of weld position!

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, melmerby said:

I shouldn't think the driver was too happy either - looks like his side took the impact.

At least he didn't knock the bicycle over !

  • Funny 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about a mixed parcels train, with what appears to be a Thompson non-vestibule composite, something that looks vaguely GWR and three vans; running behind a tender first B17 61637 'Thorpe Hall' in Cambridge 1951/2?

 

 

61637_mixed_cambridge_1951:2.JPG.d9f377d6c231892b4361f30585afa2f3.JPG

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, melmerby said:

I shouldn't think the driver was too happy either - looks like his side took the impact.

 

The view hasn't changed much in 67 years:

https://goo.gl/maps/6ro1u5SZATAaRMF16

The bike's been updated a bit though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bored of straight sleepers? Alternate V sleepers on 760mm Austrian narrow gauge on the Tamsweg to Unzmarkt line

 

 

IMG_8455.JPG

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not as outrageous as some things on here but a couple that appeal to me.  A Baby Deltic with a mix of red and blue coaches and an ex GWR fruit van (I think).  Then a Scottish arrival with 26's in blue and green, an ex Southern van and a mix of Mk1 sleepers and day coaches

 

7023422645_257dcb19b9_c.jpgD5906 Hadley Wood 21.10.66 by George Woods, on Flickr

 

7138607629_1b94cbe459_c.jpg5415/5355 Fort William Stn. 10.72 by George Woods, on Flickr

  • Like 16

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 'Prototype for Everything' here is that a Baby Deltic was actually moving under its own power at all!

  • Like 1
  • Funny 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LMS2968 said:

The 'Prototype for Everything' here is that a Baby Deltic was actually moving under its own power at all!

 

I think you will find that there is a motor in the PMV:D

 

Regards

 

Ian

  • Like 2
  • Funny 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.