Jump to content

Gladiator WW2 Railgun


Garethp8873
 Share

Recommended Posts

.

 

The Imperial War Museum have a great selection of photos, with a reasonable search function.

 

This is their (wide) selection of WW1 "railway guns" ;

 

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search?query=Railway%20gun&f%5B0%5D=department%3APhotographs&f%5B1%5D=contentDate%3AFirst%20World%20War&items_per_page=50

 

 

And this is WW2 ;

 

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search?query=Railway%20gun&f%5B0%5D=department%3APhotographs&f%5B1%5D=contentDate%3ASecond%20World%20War&items_per_page=50

 

You MIGHT get a few more if you search on the individual gun names (???)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

The pricing doesn't make sense. Apparently they will sell you one for £49.95, or with an ROD Dean Goods thrown in for the same price, or with sound in the Dean Goods for only £99.95, dramatically less than the price of a sound-equipped Dean on its own. 

 

And I suspect at these prices the gun barrel isn't fully proofed.

 

You were supposed to say "well done Oxford, excellent value for money, keep it up'. Now they suspect something is wrong....

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A rail mounted gun does seem pointless, in the big scheme of things.

 

It’s not a tank, i presume it can’t turn, so limited to pointing in the direction of the rails. The ricochet surely could be damaging to the rails it’s sits on, and how long is it to reload ?

 

It kind of feels like the last gasp of sieging a castle based warfare, was it a gun to fire at inbound ships in case of invasion ?

Rail guns were a legacy from WW1 where trenches and artillery made the whole front one big siege.

 

Their use in WW2 was mainly confined to the Germans and Soviets. I think one of the most well known was Anzio Annie. It fired on the beaches when the front became static.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Its completely useless for my layout, but it could be put in a terminus as part of a WW2 fund raising diorama!

 

Anyhow, Rule 1 and all that, I might just have to bite the bullet and pre-order one.  Unless Oxford do a Bachmann 45 ton crane and hike the prices ......

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

...It kind of feels like the last gasp of sieging a castle based warfare, was it a gun to fire at inbound ships in case of invasion ?

 Pretty much obsolescent in a WWII context with the weapon in the UK. The full machinery to serve and direct large calibre guns was fully integrated in a warship. Power supply, shell and charge handling systems, accurate recovery from recoil and loading position for bearing and elevation, calculator, target director plot and spotting is all required to work the thing effectively. And at the very least some muzzle blast and splinter protection for the crew and ready magazine are 'a good thing'. Looks like a morale booster for the uninformed to me. A battery of mobile heavy field artillery likely to be much more useful in reality.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of the Middleton Press line books have interesting images. Dover to Ramsgate (plates 30 and 31) shows the fan of sidings mentioned above, and a side view of "Piecemaker" with a 13.5 inch gun. Mention is also made of Boche Buster (with an 18 inch gun) being allocated from November 1941 with 4 LMS diesel shunters. In Faversham to Canterbury plate 71 shows the sidings at the former Stonehall Colliery site. This location between Kearsney and Lydden Tunnel was used for gun servicing and preparation and one line from the north end of Lydden Tunnel to Martin Mill via the Kearsney Loop was reserved for gun movements. I have also found a photo of a rail-mounted gun at Martin Mill, allegedly with an 18 inch gun . This is in a volume called "Kent at War" by Bob Ogley.

Yes basically the 14" Bosch Buster was on the closed Elham valley line stationed at Bishopsbourne tunnel, a specially constructed curved firing spur was south of the tunnel.

Bosch_Buster_firing_spur.jpg

 

The 13.5" guns where originally on the East Kent LR, the Magazines still exist.

Pic01439_640.jpg

Originally to protect the beaches against invation but then used on the Martin Mill military railway at Dover, as they had a range of 27,3/4 miles where used along with the fixed guns at Dover to lob shells at the German coastal guns. Curved firing spurs where laid near Townsend farm now under a caravan site and one near the level crossing in my post above, where Upper road was rerouted around the spur. LMS and the Maunsell Diesel shunters where used for movements as smoke from a steam engine would have given their position away especially on top of the cliffs at Dover

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

The trade prices have been announced. All three are TBA. Same as the retail price. That leaves us staring down the barrel.....................

 

Our nearby retailer may have jumped the gun with their price.

 

I'll get me coat......

 

Not often that a model of this calibre appears. You might have to shell out to buy it, though you might want to wait for a magazine review.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

The rail mounting means you can have a very big battleship type gun, when tanks were fitted with only very small guns.

To aim the gun you run it along a curving siding until it is pointing in the right direction.

As the gun fires over the end of the wagon it sits on recoil is taken up by the whole gun rolling backwards down the track, presumably stopped by having the brakes part on. 

As they were based in Kent I would assume that anti invasion work was what they were intended for.

Feel for anyone standing on it at firing time !
Link to post
Share on other sites

The trade prices have been announced. All three are TBA. Same as the retail price. That leaves us staring down the barrel.....................

 

Our nearby retailer may have jumped the gun with their price.

 

I'll get me coat......

Prices were on the launch email sent out by Oxford. I struggled to reconcile a Loco & new wagon for £49.95 but that was what it says

 

OR76BOOM01 WWI Boche Buster - Camouflage and ROD2330

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £49.95

Barcode:

5055530130470

 

OR76BOOM01XS WWI Boche Buster - Camouflage and ROD2330 DCC Sound

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £99.95

Barcode:

5055530130487

 

OR76BOOM02 Railgun Gladiator WWII Railgun

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £49.95

Barcode:

5055530130494

Link to post
Share on other sites

Prices were on the launch email sent out by Oxford. I struggled to reconcile a Loco & new wagon for £49.95 but that was what it says

 

OR76BOOM01 WWI Boche Buster - Camouflage and ROD2330

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £49.95

Barcode:

5055530130470

 

OR76BOOM01XS WWI Boche Buster - Camouflage and ROD2330 DCC Sound

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £99.95

Barcode:

5055530130487

 

OR76BOOM02 Railgun Gladiator WWII Railgun

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £49.95

Barcode:

5055530130494

Hattons say £130, £220, and £49 respectively.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Halwill Railway gun

 

 

1940s, World War II- Railway Gun rests at Halwill Junction (left) before proceeding to Ashbury Station area (right) to fire a live shell into Okehampton Artillery Range impact area - over the heads of many people and houses!! ..what would Health and Safety say about that today - wear a tin hat?!

https://flic.kr/p/aKZANc

 

Railway Gun at Ashbury

 

 

1940s, World War II- Railway Gun rests at Halwill Junction (left) before proceeding to Ashbury Station area (right) to fire a live shell into Okehampton Artillery Range impact area - over the heads of many people and houses!!

https://flic.kr/p/aKZAEg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes basically the 14" Bosch Buster was on the closed Elham valley line stationed at Bishopsbourne tunnel, a specially constructed curved firing spur was south of the tunnel.

Bosch_Buster_firing_spur.jpg

 

The 13.5" guns where originally on the East Kent LR, the Magazines still exist.

Pic01439_640.jpg

Originally to protect the beaches against invation but then used on the Martin Mill military railway at Dover, as they had a range of 27,3/4 miles where used along with the fixed guns at Dover to lob shells at the German coastal guns. Curved firing spurs where laid near Townsend farm now under a caravan site and one near the level crossing in my post above, where Upper road was rerouted around the spur. LMS and the Maunsell Diesel shunters where used for movements as smoke from a steam engine would have given their position away especially on top of the cliffs at Dover

The locos also needed to be ready to go when orders arrived. Waiting a few hours for steam loco to warn up would never do.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty much obsolescent in a WWII context with the weapon in the UK. The full machinery to serve and direct large calibre guns was fully integrated in a warship. Power supply, shell and charge handling systems, accurate recovery from recoil and loading position for bearing and elevation, calculator, target director plot and spotting is all required to work the thing effectively. And at the very least some muzzle blast and splinter protection for the crew and ready magazine are 'a good thing'. Looks like a morale booster for the uninformed to me. A battery of mobile heavy field artillery likely to be much more useful in reality.

Of course the other way round the Germans were regularly bombarding Dover using their guns around Calais. It continued until late September 1944 when the German guns were captured by Canadian forces. As well as fixed gun emplacements, the German army also deployed railway guns at Calais, primarily as defence against a coastal invasion.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

This really does get the 2018 award - and hey, it's only January! - for silliest model. Almost every RMwebber could instantly nominate a model he'd rather have seen. Given the limited resources available to produce drawings here, and manufacture there, it is a great silly shame. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not so sure it's a silly release given the huge popularity of military modelling and the cross over potential. This could be one of those models that is an inspired choice to appeal to a range of customers. Or it may flop, we'll find out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium

Hattons say £130, £220, and £49 respectively.

Thats more like it, someone didn't proof read the original announcement. I hope they bring out more stock to go with it. For WW1 some of the WD ferry vans and wagons with the continental style brakemens hutch that after the war were used between Harwich and Bishopsgate up until the 60's. For WW2 an LMS jackshaft driven diesel shunter and perhaps one of the 12 wheel ammunition vans.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium

This really does get the 2018 award - and hey, it's only January! - for silliest model. Almost every RMwebber could instantly nominate a model he'd rather have seen. Given the limited resources available to produce drawings here, and manufacture there, it is a great silly shame. 

 

 

I'm not so sure it's a silly release given the huge popularity of military modelling and the cross over potential. This could be one of those models that is an inspired choice to appeal to a range of customers. Or it may flop, we'll find out.

It may have something to do with 100 years since the armistice.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that silly, they can sell this thing worldwide as part of their military 1/76 items. I,ve already seen their Diecast range on sale abroad.

 

The Lima leopald was being sold for around 2 decades and it is not even in one of the military scales (1/87).

 

Of course, when I think through which one to buy, it cannot be justified on an SECR layout, it would only be assembled on the western front (unless someone digs up evidence that they were test fired on Sheppy island). The WW2 version, fits in with all my WWII collection. Some of the German rail guns survive in preservation (trophies of war) but none of the UK ones survived (except the odd gun itself).

 

As a practical model for running on a layout, the 9.2in guns are probably better, being smaller and not needing to be dismounted in order to run on the mainline.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The pricing doesn't make sense. Apparently they will sell you one for £49.95, or with an ROD Dean Goods thrown in for the same price, or with sound in the Dean Goods for only £99.95

 

It's better to order direct from Oxford, then, because it appears that Hattons, for example, didn't get the same memo. They currently quote 42.50, 130.00, and 220.00 respectively. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

It may have something to do with 100 years since the armistice.

 

Indeed it may. But how much sentiment over the lost, wasted lives of WW1 will spill over into opening the wallet?

 

My belief is that military modellers are above all strategic in their outlook and re-enactments. This thing is anything but strategic. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s a new Oxford Rail policy as perhaps Oxford Rail are testing all their design errors/flaws/ misdemeanours on a product no one/very few will buy or knows very little about. I commend them for giving it a go but surely there are other models they could have tried - even nonGW models to avoid another Dean Goods saga!

 

An interesting prototype but not one you will ever see in many layout settings - even Rule 1 will be stretched here. So 10 out of 10 for left field ideas but if they are to continue making OO gauge models they might like to go a bit more mainstream!!!

 

But the model world is a vast diorama of requirements and quite a few will be happy I’m sure. I’ll wait and see for future developments.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...