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War of the Worlds - Oh dear...

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On 27/11/2019 at 14:46, Phil Parker said:

 

On the other hand the "Hornby War of the Worlds" set would only be a paint job away.

I'll be buying popcorn to enjoy the sequel "Hornby's War of the Forums".

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On 30/11/2019 at 10:59, Torper said:

Buts that all too often the case nowadays - fashionable screenwriters deciding that they know a bit better than the original author and "adjusting" their dramas accordingly, subsequently to bask in high praise from the critics while the public turns off in droves.

 

DT

I think the issue is sales. Money. You know, that stuff that makes people greedy. The Beeb (and anyone else who finances TV productions) must make a profit, and that means selling the production to as many TV channels around the world who will take it. While the classic costume drama the BBC was famous for 20-40 years ago gives them comfy laurels to recline against I very much doubt any satellite/cable TV channel would today buy "I Claudius". Today you need to appeal to the masses more than ever which means any retelling of any classic story must be cream-coated and cherry-topped with relevant social/political/whatever themes. Who, in their right mind (*) wants to watch a bunch of actors in big dresses and Mr D'Arcy shirtlessness spouting Victorian values?

(*) sarcasm.

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On 04/12/2019 at 10:49, Joseph_Pestell said:

 

Plain fact, it is a lot cheaper to film in Prague or Budapest than in Paris. And, yes, the authorities are more accommodating to film companies.

 

But, if they wanted to, there are still plenty of quiet corners of Paris that have changed remarkably little since the 1950s. Being almost as fussy about architectural style as I am about BR Mk1 carriages cropping up in the 1930s, I wish they would take more care about such details. Or simply take the Maigret stories and adapt them to 21st century French settings. The storylines are strong enough to do that.

 

Perhaps they should  build a big filmset somewhere and create a tourism venue with it. Build it in the right place (ex-coal or ex-steel) and they could probably get EU finance for it.

Interesting Jo.

Though I've never lived there, I know Paris quite well including explorations of less well known corners. More to the point, I knew it in in the 1970s when a lot more of it remained unmodernised and I totally believed the Budapest settings used in the Michael Gambon and Rowan Atkinson versions and the Prague settings used in the French Bruno Cremer Maigrets. In the latter case French viewers seem to have believed it too. The only problem was when a steam hauled train appeared and it and the railway it ran on were simply not French.

The problem with quiet corners is that much of the narrative takes place on busy streets and boulevards as well and I think that would be far harder to achieve in real Paris now. Similarly, if you were doing a story set in the financial heart of the City of London in the 1950s, where would you film it today? I'd wager not in London at all.

 

3 hours ago, Martin S-C said:

Cost.
And the aforementioned fact that your average viewer doesn't know one steam loco from another, so the expense of getting the exact rolling stock correct is basically a complete waste of money.
Remember that TV series and film makers are telling stories, not writing accurate history books. The details don't matter, only the story does.

Indeed, all television production involves compromise and it's not just your average viewer whose enjoyment won't be spoiled. Even if you know where compromises have been made, if the overall impression is convincing enough,  you can still suspend your   disbelief.  I'm sure there are farmers who notice the wrong shape of a hay bale, electrical engineers who spot the wrong pattern of insulators on power lines and typographers who know that a particular variant of a typestyle was only published five years later, but most of us can skate over the odd detail like that even if we are aware of it. However, when either too many of the details just start feeling wrong or there's a really glaring error, then you stop accepting the story.

 

For most of the Gambon Maigrets I was quite happily in 1950s Paris even though I knew it had been filmed in Budapest but when a very Eastern European train appeared in one of them my illusion was totally shattered. That didn't happen when I saw Mk 1 coaches arrving at "Bletchley Station" in Enigma. I knew that's what they were but they still looked the part for a train in the early 1940s as indeed they do on heritage lines up and down the country.

Edited by Pacific231G

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"Poor George. He did have such terrible typhus."  (BBC script writer:  'What do you mean the main character doesn't die in the book?  What?  What?  Cavor has a cold and in any case isn't in WotW?  Sorry, no, you'll have to speak up, can't hear you over the sound of striking the keyboard.....') 

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18 minutes ago, James Harrison said:

"Poor George. He did have such terrible typhus."  (BBC script writer:  'What do you mean the main character doesn't die in the book?  What?  What?  Cavor has a cold and in any case isn't in WotW?  Sorry, no, you'll have to speak up, can't hear you over the sound of striking the keyboard.....') 

I don't think he was the main character, this version was from the female perspective and she was the main character.

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3 hours ago, woodenhead said:

I don't think he was the main character, this version was from the female perspective and she was the main character.

 

My thoughts were on seeing the first few minutes was it is Political Correctness mixed with Equal Opportunities !

 

I believe the minor earthquake was actually the late Mr Wells turning in his grave!

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