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Dave F's photos - ongoing - more added each day

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1 hour ago, Stentor said:


Phil, I think that’s a Mk2 Cortina not a Morris 1100 Countryman which makes it more likely to be in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased).
 

//Simon 

 

I bow to your greater car ID skills Simon!

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3 hours ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

I bet that last one was popular along the country lanes!

 

Mike.

 

 

I think that anyone who lived near Cadeby in those days would be used to all sorts of slow moving steam driven vehicles on the road.

 

I remember once travelling through several villages on Teddy's steam roller, Thistledown, en route to roll a drive at a house belonging to one of his friends.

 

It was also quite common back then to tow a car behind a traction engine (o ra steam roller) on the way to and from rallies - often with a thresher or a living van as well.

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1 hour ago, Stentor said:


Phil, I think that’s a Mk2 Cortina not a Morris 1100 Countryman which makes it more likely to be in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased).
 

//Simon 

It;s being towed, it must be an 1100!:jester:

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I can remember coming back from commentating at a Stock Car meeting at Mildenhall being in a long queue of traffic which was following a very nice traction engine.When I got to the front of the queue I started waving cars behind me past so I could keep following the traction engine. They then found a spot where they could pull in and let the cars past. I pulled in to the lay-by with them and got chatting. I said that I thought it was wonderful to see the traction engine in action and they told me that they were going to be at a show in Dagenham the following weekend and if I could get there (I lived in Basildon at the time so it was easy) they would have a surprise for me. 

 

The following Saturday I was at the show in Dagenham and the surprise was being allowed to steer the traction engine around the parade ground for about half an hour. My admiration for those who drive them went up a few hundred percent and I had a wonderful day with some very nice people. Sadly I lost their contact details and so never saw them again.

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Found using Google: Published: 8th October 2015:

"Kerr Stuart ‘Sirdar’ class 0-4-0T 1158/1917 Diana, once of the Kerry Tramway and the slate quarry operations at Oakeley and Pen-yr-Orsedd, and ex-Penrhyn slate quarry Hunslet 0-4-0ST Margaret (605/1894) both made their public debut in steam during Vale of Rheidol Railway’s September 26-27 Steam Festival Weekend.

Privately owned Diana and VoR’s Margaret last steamed 65 years ago. Restoration of both was completed in the magnificent workshop facility developed at Vale of Rheidol Railway’s Aberystwyth terminus during the weeks leading up to the Festival Weekend – and both pulled their first-ever passenger train, appropriately double-heading, on the Saturday morning opening of the event."

Jonathan

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Bet that was a long trip Kings x Via Carslile to Berdeen its normaly eight hours how long was that journey?

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Should have said Aberdeen dodgy fingers!!!!!1

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3 hours ago, DaveF said:

 

 

I think that anyone who lived near Cadeby in those days would be used to all sorts of slow moving steam driven vehicles on the road.

 

I remember once travelling through several villages on Teddy's steam roller, Thistledown, en route to roll a drive at a house belonging to one of his friends.

 

It was also quite common back then to tow a car behind a traction engine (o ra steam roller) on the way to and from rallies - often with a thresher or a living van as well.

It's not that uncommon to see a small runabout-type car being towed behind some of the larger motor homes on the motorways today.

 

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Good evening, David. I like the latest Carlisle photo’s which are all of interest. In the first photo’, 31418, Boadicea, on a Carlisle to Leeds service, on the 30th May, 1990, the 31 is certainly in a rundown, well weathered looking condition, which is how many seemed to be by that time. Just so well captured in that photo’.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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C15409 - an eminently modellable PW train...

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Good evening, David. I like the photo’s of Kings Cross, from the 20th October, 1993. They are all both full of interest and nostalgia. Thank you for posting them. In C19177, you have a great line up of 91’s and a HST, with 91027, amongst the 91’s.  A view which can no longer be seen. 
 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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Good afternoon, David. I like the Swayfield photo’s which all are of interest. In J6129, that down HST, 245008, in May, 1978, makes a quite a sight as it runs by at speed on what is, like you say either crew training or testing. The two Deltic photo’s are delightful, and thank you for posting them. I wish we could go back to those days.


With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

 

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Thanks for the Kings Cross photos. I spent many years commuting into London on EMUs in NSE and then Thameslink livery

Jonathan

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We haven't met, Dave, but why am I not at all surprised by your mark of respect for the deceased? The tenor of your writings and captions tell me a lot. 

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As well as J3689 recording 47421, MkII coaching stock and the semaphore distant, it also captures another moment in history. The "dropped" telegraph pole indicating the passing of "open wire" comms infrastructure and the move to cable technology for long distance transmission systems on the railways.

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1 hour ago, iands said:

As well as J3689 recording 47421, MkII coaching stock and the semaphore distant, it also captures another moment in history. The "dropped" telegraph pole indicating the passing of "open wire" comms infrastructure and the move to cable technology for long distance transmission systems on the railways.

The ETD (Extension Trunk Dialling) network, enabling a dialled call from Penzance to Thurso entirely over BR lines, was a major contribution to modernising the railway. 

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5 minutes ago, Oldddudders said:

The ETD (Extension Trunk Dialling) network, enabling a dialled call from Penzance to Thurso entirely over BR lines, was a major contribution to modernising the railway. 

Indeed so, and the BR transmission network considerably helped with modernising the railway in other ways also, like supporting the TOPS network and other key systems. 

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13 minutes ago, DaveF said:

C18117

Is that the Penshaw monument on the hill above the RH coach of the 158?

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It's in a few of the photos around Plawsworth . You can see it for miles in any direction.

 

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Good afternoon, David. I like the Plawsworth photo’s, which are all of interest, and show more of the ECML. In the last photo’,  C19328, with a HST on a down express on the 12th March, 1994, you have a great example of a ‘train in the landscape’ photo’. 
 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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